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Manufacturing Engineering Technology BS

Semester Requirements

S. Manian Ramkumar, Department Chair
(585) 475-7070, smrmet@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/cast/mmet/

Program overview

The present shortage of qualified manufacturing engineers is between 50,000 and 100,000. Combined with innovations in industrial productivity and technology and the demand for well-prepared manufacturing engineers is only increasing. Manufacturing engineers are retiring faster than graduates are produced, resulting in outstanding employment opportunities. The manufacturing engineering technology major prepares students to meet the demand for personnel well-versed in advanced manufacturing technologies, which include computer-aided design, computer numerical control, microprocessor controls, robotics, computer-aided manufacturing, flexible manufacturing systems, assembly automation, and electronics manufacturing.

Goals

The goal of the major is to prepare individuals for professional employment in the fields of production systems design, development, and manufacturing. Designed to provide the skills necessary for applying emerging manufacturing technologies, the major develops well rounded manufacturing engineers who are lifelong learners with the ability to adapt, grow and succeed in a highly competitive workplace. A cooperative education program enhances these skills by allowing students to gain valuable experience working in the manufacturing industries.

Accreditation

The manufacturing engineering technology major is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Curriculum

The curriculum is designed with the aid and consultation of professionals in the field and emphasizes computer-integrated manufacturing and production system development. Courses cover traditional and nontraditional manufacturing processes, fundamentals of electronics and microprocessors, computer-aided design and manufacturing, computer numerical control, robotics, materials requirements planning, design for manufacturing and assembly, surface-mount electronics manufacturing and assembly, flexible manufacturing systems, quality control, engineering economics, plastics manufacturing, manufacturing management, and lean manufacturing.

Manufacturing engineering technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MCET-101 Fundamentals of Engineering 3
MFET-120 Manufacturing Processes 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
MATH-171, 172 LAS Perspective 7A, 7B: Calculus A, B 6
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
MCET-110, 111 Foundations of Materials and Lab 3
MCET-150, 151 Mechanical Design and Fabrication and Lab 4
PHYS-111 LAS Perspective 5: College Physics 1 4
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Writing 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MCET-220 Principles of Statics 3
  LAS Perspective 2 3
MATH-211 Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations 3
PHYS-112 College Physics II 4
MCET-210, 211 Materials in Engineering Design and Lab 3
MCET-221 Strength of Materials 4
EEET-215, 216 Circuits and Electronics and Lab 3
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I  3
COMM-203  Effective Technical Communication 3
  LAS Perspective 3 3
Third Year
STAT-146 Introduction to Statistics II 4
MFET-340, 341 Automation Control Systems and Lab 3
MFET-345, 346 Electronics Manufacturing and Lab 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Free Elective 3
MFET-299 Cooperative Education Preparation 0
MFET-499 Cooperative Education (spring, summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
MFET-420 Quality Engineering Principles 3
MFET-445, 446 Robotics and Automation (WI) and Lab 3
MFET-436 Engineering Economics 3
CHMG-131 LAS Perspective 6: General Chemistry for Engineers 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
MFET-450 Lean Production and Supply Chain Operations 3
MFET-460 Integrated Design for Manufacture and Assembly 3
  Technical Elective 3
  LAS Perspectives 4 3
MFET-499 Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fifth Year
MFET-499 Cooperative Education (fall) Co-op
MFET-580 Production Systems Design 3
MFET-590 Production Systems Development 3
  Free Elective 3
  LAS Elective 3
  Technical Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 125

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.
† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2013-14 academic year.

Accelerated dual degree option

An accelerated dual degree option allows students to earn a BS in manufacturing engineering technology and an MS in manufacturing and mechanical systems integration in five years.

Manufacturing engineering technology, BS degree/Mechanical systems integration, MS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MCET-101 Fundamentals of Engineering 3
MFET-120 Manufacturing Processes 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
MATH-171 LAS Perspective 7A: Calculus A  3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
MCET-110, 111 Foundations of Materials and Lab 3
MCET-150, 151 Mechanical Design and Fabrication and Lab 4
PHYS-111 LAS Perspective 5: College Physics 1 4
MATH-172 LAS Perspective 7B: Calculus B 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Writing 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MCET-220 Principles of Statics 3
  LAS Perspective 2 3
MATH-211 Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations 3
PHYS-112 College Physics II 4
MCET-210, 211 Materials in Engineering Design and Lab 3
MCET-221 Strength of Materials 4
EEET-215, 216 Circuits and Electronics and Lab 3
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I  3
COMM-203  Effective Technical Communications 3
  LAS Perspective 3 3
  Co-op Preparation 0
MCET-499 Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Third Year
STAT-146 Introduction to Statistics II 4
MCET-320 Mechanical Dynamics with Applications 3
  LAS Perspective 4 3
MCET-430, 530 Thermal Fluid Systems I, II 6
MFET-650 Manufacturing and Mechanical Systems Fundamentals 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Concentration Course 1 3
CQAS-682 Six Sigma Fundamentals 3
MCET-499 Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
MCET-330 Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power 3
MCET-450 Mechanical Analysis and Design I 3
MCET-400 Experimental Methods 3
CQAS-670 Designing Experiments for Process Improvement 3
CHMG-131 LAS Perspective 5: General Chemistry for Engineers 3
MCET-550, 551 Mechanical Analysis and Design II and Lab 4
MCET-535 Thermal Fluid Systems Lab 2
  LAS Immersion 2 3
  Concentration Course 2 3
  Program Elective 3
MFET-499 Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fifth Year
  LAS Immersion 3 3
  Free Electives 6
  Technical Elective 3
PACK-672 Graduate Writing Strategies 3
DECS-744 Project Management 3
  Concentration Course 3 3
ACCT-703 Accounting for Decisions Makers 3
Choose one of the following: 3
   MFET-788    Thesis Prep  
     Program Elective  
Choose one of the following: 3
      Capstone Project or Thesis  
     Program Elective and Comprehensive Exam  
Total Semester Credit Hours 155

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.
† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2013-14 academic year.

Additional information

Part-time study

Students who are employed full time may pursue the major on a part-time basis by taking the upper-division portion of the curriculum during day or evening hours. It is recommended that students take one to two courses per semester. Students also may elect certain courses from other engineering technology majors, with department approval.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The present shortage of qualified manufacturing engineers and technologists is between 50,000 and 100,000 people—and the need is increasing. Manufacturing engineers are retiring faster than graduates are produced, resulting in outstanding employment opportunities. In addition, industrial productivity and technological innovations are driving the demand for well-prepared manufacturing engineers.

The manufacturing engineering technology program prepares students to meet the demand for personnel well-versed in the new manufacturing technologies, which include computer-aided design, computer numerical control, microprocessor controls, robotics, computer-aided manufacturing, flexible manufacturing systems, assembly automation, and electronics manufacturing.

Goals

The goal of the program is to prepare individuals for professional employment in the fields of product design, development, and manufacturing. The program is designed to provide the skills necessary for applying emerging manufacturing technologies. A cooperative education program enhances these skills by allowing students to gain valuable experience working in the manufacturing industries. Throughout the academic program, a significant amount of hands-on laboratory experience in manufacturing is provided.

Accreditation

The manufacturing engineering technology program is operated as a cooperative education program and is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Accelerated dual degree

The college offers an accelerated dual degree. The option allows students to earn a BS in manufacturing engineering technology and an MS in manufacturing and mechanical systems integration in five years. For further information, please contact an adviser.

Curriculum

The curriculum has been designed with the aid and consultation of professionals in the field and emphasizes computer-integrated manufacturing and product development. Courses cover traditional and nontraditional manufacturing processes, fundamentals of electronics and microprocessors, computer-aided design, computer numerical control, robotics, group technology, computer-aided process planning, materials requirements planning, surface-mount electronics design and assembly, flexible manufacturing systems, quality control, engineering economics, value analysis, plastics manufacturing, manufacturing management, and lean manufacturing.

Manufacturing engineering technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0610-211 Introduction to Materials Technology 3
0610-304 Materials Testing 1
0617-220 Manufacturing Processes I 4
1016-231 Calculus for Engineering Technology 4
1720-051, 052 First-Year Enrichment 2
0617-262 Solid Modeling and Design 4
0617-420 Manufacturing Processes II 4
1016-232 Calculus for Engineering Technology II 4
0610-220 Design Dimensioning and Tolerancing 4
1016-304 Differential Equations for Engineering Technology 4
1017-211 College Physics I 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
Second Year
0610-302 Introduction to Statics 4
0610-305 Pneumatics and Hydraulics 4
1016-319 Data Analysis I 6
1017-212, 213 College Physics II, III 8
0609-411 Electrical Principles for Design I 4
0610-303 Strength of Materials 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Wellness Education† 0
0610-315 Principles of Mechanical Design I 4
0610-309 Computational Methods for Engineering Technology 1
  Ethics Elective 4
0535-403 Effective Technical Communication 4
  Free Elective 4
Third Year
0606-099 Cooperative Education Preparation 0
0617-455, 457 Introduction to Electronics Packaging, Lab 5
0617-485 Robots in Manufacturing 4
0618-231 Technical Programming 4
0617-436 Engineering Economics 4
0617-471 Computer Numerical Control 4
1011-208 College Chemistry 4
  Free Electives 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Fourth Year
0617-440 Production and Operations Management I 4
0610-416 Materials Technology 4
0617-470 Controls for Manufacturing Automation 3
0617-441 Production and Operations Management II 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
0610-409 Mechanical Engineering Technology Lab II 2
0617-472 Tool Engineering 4
1016-320 Data Analysis II 6
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Fifth Year
0617-475 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 4
  Technical Electives 8
0617-510 Process Design 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Free Elective 4
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 205

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Additional information

Part-time option

For students who are employed full time, the upper division of this program may be taken on a part-time basis during the evening. It normally takes approximately 13 quarters for the typical evening student to complete the upper-division course requirements. In the early quarters, the fundamentals of mathematics, science, engineering, electronics, and processes are emphasized to provide a foundation for later courses in computer-integrated manufacturing and technical electives. Students also may elect certain courses from other programs. (Some technical electives are offered only every other year. Please check with an adviser when planning the program’s technical elective content.)