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Provost’s Update

2013 Year-End Provost's Update

Colleagues,

It was just last year when we saw the rapid emergence of the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the subsequent media blitz of what these large-enrollment courses meant. At the time, there were no clear business models emerging but everyone suspected it was a matter of time. Indeed, it was just a matter of time. Recently, Georgia Tech announced a partnership with a prominent MOOC-provider, Udacity, to offer a master’s of science degree to students for under $7,000. While this partnership remains controversial on the Georgia Tech campus, the computer science faculty did approve this agreement. You can read more about it on the Inside Higher Ed website.

Regarding this partnership, I received a very thoughtful email from Professor Jim Leone, who gave me permission to share his message with you. He wrote:

 

“I don't know whether to laugh or cry. On the one hand, I think it is great if our country could pump out tons of CS Masters students for under $7,000.  We (the US) certainly could use the talent here although I wonder how many of the proposed 10,000 students will be US citizens.  

I no longer have a grasp of just what the cost model is for academic institutions of higher learning.  I'm trying to figure out just how a $6,630 online-based master's program can be extended to those disciplines that depend on physical infrastructures such as chemistry, biology and engineering laboratories.  Of course, the answer is they cannot.  Consequently, us poor, land-based institutions with our plethora of buildings that cost more each year to maintain will just have to plod along producing STEM graduates and wondering how RIT is going to exist 5-, 10- and 15-years from now.” 

 

He’s right. Many land-based institutions will be challenged and we cannot stick our heads in the ground. But I submit that RIT is perfectly positioned to emerge in this new world order as a national and indeed an international leader among higher education institutions. There are three reasons for my thinking: first, our career-focused, experiential learning model is the envy of all and exactly what the market of parents and students seek; second, with the Innovative Learning Institute as well as our past history to pedagogically innovate, we are not ignoring the expanding online market and in fact, we are capitalizing on it; third, RIT has been, and will continue to be, on a bold path to be recognized as an national university with a reputation built on innovation and this vision is enabling us to recruit students from across the world in a way we haven’t been able to do in the past. We will, even in the time span of the next 15 years, be in the face-to-face education business but we will also be aggressive in the online space and use technology to enhance our student’s learning. From my perspective, we want to be RIT.

It is appropriate, with this as the backdrop, to share with you my end-of-the-year review, structured around our key focus areas – calendar conversion and the Innovative Learning Initiative – and the five core priorities – student success, research and innovation, inclusive and global education, academic excellence, and faculty and staff success.

 

Jeremy Haefner, Ph.D.
Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Key Focus Area: Calendar Conversion Phase III

You may have seen Fernando’s recent message about the Calendar Conversion process and how far we’ve come. Here are a few highlights...

You may have seen Fernando’s recent message about the Calendar Conversion process and how far we’ve come. Here are a few highlights:

  • Our scheduling officers have uploaded 2,951 distinct semester courses to the new SIS.
  • Working with RIT’s departments and programs leadership and the Registrar’s Office, our scheduling officers have programmed 4,938 class sections for fall 2013 semester alone.
  • Over 9,000 students have enrolled in classes for our first semester ever.

To celebrate the official end of the quarter system at RIT, we will be having a celebration on August 29, 2013 at 3 PM. There will be a ceremony at Ingle Auditorium, following which we will deposit a time capsule to commemorate our work and the beginning of a new era in the history of RIT. 

Key Focus Area: Innovative Learning Institute

Since the ILI was officially launched in the fall, the ILI has been enthusiastically embraced by the RIT community.  The team, led by interim Director Neil Hair, has launched a new, award-winning ILI website, conducted a market analysis of online education, and has been working diligently with faculty through the Teaching and Learning Studio (TLS).

Since the ILI was officially launched in the fall, the ILI has been enthusiastically embraced by the RIT community.  The team, led by interim Director Neil Hair, has launched a new, award-winning ILI website, conducted a market analysis of online education, and has been working diligently with faculty through the Teaching and Learning Studio (TLS). The TLS has been offering training opportunities for faculty to learn about flipped classrooms and new interactive technologies. Additionally, a majority of the recent Provost’s Learning Innovation Grants (PLIG) recipients are developing projects to further explore the flipped classroom model. The ILI team, working closely with the departments and faculty, will begin offering a series of course bundles in the fall for which the market research has indicated there is great interest. I am proud of what we have accomplished so far and look forward to what we will accomplish in the future.

Student Success

The following items reflect the work and activities that support and lead to the success of our students as measured by achievement of learning and completion of their degree.

The following items reflect the work and activities that support and lead to the success of our students as measured by achievement of learning and completion of their degree.

Refined Grading System Analysis Completed

The Plus-Minus Grading Taskforce completed an impact analysis of the refined grading system (also known as plus/minus grading) and the results of the three-part study were presented to the Academic Senate in March.

The Plus-Minus Grading Taskforce completed an impact analysis of the refined grading system (also known as plus/minus grading) and the results of the three-part study were presented to the Academic Senate in March. The results were in line with what we have learned from our extensive research and reviews of other institutions that have implemented similar grading systems. The implementation, which had been scheduled for this fall, will be postponed as discussions need to take place within the colleges regarding how the new refined grading system may affect prerequisites, multiple-section courses, and more.

During the 2013-2014 academic year, I will charge the colleges and departments to develop policies that ensure that the refined grading system at RIT will be fair and consistent. Despite this delay, RIT is fully committed to implementing the refined grading system, which will provide a more accurate assessment of learning by our students.

 

University Studies Celebrates First Graduates

In 2009, RIT established University Studies, a major exploration program for first-year, undeclared students and for first or second year students wishing to change majors.

In 2009, RIT established University Studies, a major exploration program for first-year, undeclared students and for first or second year students wishing to change majors. This program has been very successful in helping students find their final program of study, and this year we celebrated our first graduates.  The University Studies program had 21 students who graduated this year from the first class who began in 2009, and another 21 graduates who entered the program as internal transfers. I congratulate the faculty and staff of the University Studies program for all their efforts. I am sure this is just the beginning of a successful program that will see many graduates over the coming years.

New Student Leave of Absence Policy Developed and Approved

A study of the data related to students taking leaves of absences indicated that very few of them return to the university to complete their degrees. 

A study of the data related to students taking leaves of absences indicated that very few of them return to the university to complete their degrees. To address this issue, a new policy to guide the process of requesting and approving student leaves of absences was recommended by the governance groups and approved by president.  Please see Policy D02.1 for details.   Many thanks to the Tiger Success Team lead by Stephanie Bauschard and Liane Fitzgerald for their efforts in developing this policy.

Revised Academic Integrity and Grade Dispute Policies Developed and Approved

In response to a charge from the provost to review the current language of policies D08.0 and D17.0 and recommend revisions to “guide expectations for academic conduct committee and appeals procedures and  assist academic units in managing various stages in the academic conduct process”, Policy D08.0, previously entitled “Academic Honesty Policy” was rewritten and retitled “Student Academic Integrity Policy.”

In response to a charge from the provost to review the current language of policies D08.0 and D17.0 and recommend revisions to “guide expectations for academic conduct committee and appeals procedures and  assist academic units in managing various stages in the academic conduct process”, Policy D08.0, previously entitled “Academic Honesty Policy” was rewritten and retitled “Student Academic Integrity Policy.” Similarly, Policy D17.0, previously entitled “Academic Conduct and Appeals Procedures” was rewritten and retitled “Final Course Grade Dispute Policy.”  These policies were recommended by the Academic Senate and approved by the president.  Thanks to the initial working group of Heidi Miller, Sharon Mason, and Ann Haake and led by Heath Boice-Pardee for their work on writing the revisions and the Academic Affairs Subcommittee led by Michael Laver for reviewing and presenting the policies to the Academic Senate. 

Research, Scholarship, Creative Work and Innovation

The following items reflect research and innovation, as well as scholarship and creative work, which form a critical part of faculty and student work. Students become engaged and learning is enhanced when faculty embrace the teacher-scholar model and infuse the classroom learning with new ideas, discoveries, and inventions. The Office of the Provost seeks to support research and innovation by eliminating barriers and providing assistance.

The following items reflect research and innovation, as well as scholarship and creative work, which form a critical part of faculty and student work. Students become engaged and learning is enhanced when faculty embrace the teacher-scholar model and infuse the classroom learning with new ideas, discoveries, and inventions. The Office of the Provost seeks to support research and innovation by eliminating barriers and providing assistance.

RIT Sets Record Number of Proposals for Second Year in a Row

Like the year before, RIT has set a new record for the number of proposals submitted for external research support. 

Like the year before, RIT has set a new record for the number of proposals submitted for external research support. This comes at a time when faculty were busy with course redesign in preparation for the start of semesters. I give my thanks and gratitude for the tremendous work the faculty have done to advance the discovery of new knowledge. 

Research Space Allocation Under Review

Sue Provenzano, assistant vice president, has been working with Ryne Raffaelle, vice president for research, and FMS staff to identify and verify research space on campus.

Sue Provenzano, assistant vice president, has been working with Ryne Raffaelle, vice president for research, and FMS staff to identify and verify research space on campus.  A full-scale space audit is planned for next year.  Additionally, Sue and Ryne are working with FMS to identify either new or upgraded software tools to help with space management on campus. It is my hope this will allow us to use our existing space more efficiently, and in ways which support our academic priorities, in the long term. 

Access Technology Gains Momentum

This year there was considerable excitement around the work done across the campus on access technology.

This year there was considerable excitement around the work done across the campus on access technology. We have partnered with the Al Sigl group to spearhead funding opportunities and the Office of the Vice President for Research sponsored a celebration of the work in this area. This locus of activity is a strength of RIT and we look forward to growing this into a center of excellence. 

Something MAGICal Happens

This year also saw the creation of the MAGIC Center at RIT—a new interdisciplinary center focused on media, arts, games, interaction, and creativity.

This year also saw the creation of the MAGIC Center at RIT—a new interdisciplinary center focused on media, arts, games, interaction, and creativity. Led by Director Andy Phelps, the MAGIC Center arises from the intersection of STEM fields with the arts and humanities. The center will be part research laboratory and part digital media production studio, and will provide students and faculty with opportunities for research programs, artistic productions and experimentation. Additionally, the center will leverage public and private partnerships and entrepreneurial activities to explore media, interaction, and creativity in the many related fields and disciplines at RIT.  I look forward to the research, projects and innovative ideas which will come from our students and faculty through the MAGIC center.

Imagine RIT Highlights

I would like to take a moment to thank all the students, faculty and staff who worked to make our annual Imagine RIT festival a success. More than 30,000 people attended the event and explored over 400 exhibits showcasing the innovation and creativity of our students and faculty.

I would like to take a moment to thank all the students, faculty and staff who worked to make our annual Imagine RIT festival a success. More than 30,000 people attended the event and explored over 400 exhibits showcasing the innovation and creativity of our students and faculty. Many exhibits were noteworthy or exceeded expectations; I will recognize just two out of many that stood out.

In the College of Science, the nanomaterials booth organized by students and faculty in the School of Chemistry and Materials Science generated an impressive amount of visitors from young children to seniors. The exhibit included hands-on demonstrations of futuristic materials including memory metal, temperature-sensitive LCDs, and RIT-designed nanocomposites.

The Kate Gleason College of Engineering had 91 exhibits- the largest number of any college- and the highest level of student and faculty participation the festival. Visitors took part in demonstrations and learned about how engineering touches their lives every day.  

These are just two of the many impressive examples of ingenuity and creativity that were on display during the festival. I know many students, faculty and staff work all year to make Imagine RIT run smoothly and I appreciate your commitment to showing the Rochester community RIT’s best and brightest ideas.

 

 

Inclusive and Global Education

The following items include those projects and activities that support RIT's value and commitment to preparing our students to effectively work in multi-cultural, diverse, and global environments.

The following items include those projects and activities that support RIT's value and commitment to preparing our students to effectively work in multi-cultural, diverse, and global environments.

Additional Funding Announced for CONNECT@RIT

“CONNECT: Increasing the Representation and Advancement of Women Faculty at RIT”, an outstanding project led by professor Margaret Bailey, received an additional $3.2 million in funding last October through the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE grant program.

“CONNECT: Increasing the Representation and Advancement of Women Faculty at RIT”, an outstanding project led by professor Margaret Bailey, received an additional $3.2 million in funding last October through the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE grant program. Dr. Bailey, faculty associate to the provost, and professor in the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, also led the EFFORT@RIT project which conducted an in-depth study of tenure, promotion and scholarship among female faculty at RIT. The new funding will be used to focus on increasing opportunities for women in STEM professions at RIT, with a special focus on underrepresented groups.  The CONNECT@RIT project seeks to address issues that have been identified as potential challenges to women seeking advancement in their professional academic careers. As Dr. Destler stated in his recent Huffington Post piece, “to cultivate the best and brightest minds and to be an innovation resource for industry, we must proactively encourage diversity.”

Marcos Esterman Named Faculty Associate for AALANA faculty; Charlotte Thoms Named Chair of AALANA Faculty Advisory Council

In their new roles as Faculty Associate and chair of the AALANA Faculty Advisor Council, respectively, Marcos Esterman and Charlotte Thoms have been working to establish their plan of work and to meet with many AALANA faculty. 

In their new roles as Faculty Associate and chair of the AALANA Faculty Advisor Council, respectively, Marcos Esterman and Charlotte Thoms have been working to establish their plan of work and to meet with many AALANA faculty. In their new appointments, Charlotte and Marcos will play a vital role in the university-wide mentoring program for African American, Latino American and Native American faculty. Together, they will provide guidance on navigating the promotion and/or tenure process, and will seek resources where appropriate, in order to improve the environment for AALANA faculty members on an individual or collective basis.

RIT Dubai President Named

Yousef Al-Assaf was named president of RIT Dubai after a rigorous, year-long search process.

Yousef Al-Assaf was named president of RIT Dubai after a rigorous, year-long search process. The former dean of the College of Engineering at the American University of Sharjah in the UAE, Dr. Al-Assaf’s experience with accreditation, building new programs and developing industry partnerships made him uniquely suited for this position. Since starting his position in February, Dr. Al-Assaf has focused on increasing enrollment at RIT Dubai and recently oversaw the second annual graduation ceremony at the Dubai campus.

 

RIT/ACMT to move into new facilities in Zagreb

The RIT/ACMT Croatia campus has achieved a number of important milestones. In addition to seeing healthy increases in applications and enrollments, the international business and the information technology programs were recently accredited by the Croatian Ministry of Education.

The RIT/ACMT Croatia campus has achieved a number of important milestones. In addition to seeing healthy increases in applications and enrollments, the international business and the information technology programs were recently accredited by the Croatian Ministry of Education. In July, the Zagreb campus will occupy a new spacious facility in a more prominent part of  the capital city and business center of Croatia. This new facility is located just south of the center of the city of Zagreb and is adjacent to a wonderful park. In addition there will be several amenities for our students. 

Global Forums a Success

The Office of International Education and Global Programs hosted six sessions of its Global Conversation series.

The Office of International Education and Global Programs hosted six sessions of its Global Conversation series. Participants learned about the opportunities and potential for teaching, research and learning in Peru, Ecuador, Sweden, China, Japan, Turkey and the Middle East. A special session on the experiences of Fulbright Scholars was also included. I am excited to see the level of interest and engagement of faculty and staff in the continued internationalization of the RIT campus. Materials from all of the forums, including speaker presentations, can be found in the Inclusive and Global Education section of my priorities website.

New International Partnerships Established

RIT has developed partnerships this year in three different parts of the world: Beijing Jiao Tong University (Beijing, China), Paderborn University (Paderborn, Germany) and Pontificia Universidad Catolica Peru in Lima.

RIT has developed partnerships this year in three different parts of the world: Beijing Jiao Tong University (Beijing, China), Paderborn University (Paderborn, Germany) and Pontificia Universidad Catolica Peru in Lima. 

Our relationship with Beijing Jiao Tong University (BJTU) includes an agreement between the College of Liberal Arts, the Saunders College of Business, and the BJTU School of Economics and Management, which will allow for deeper collaboration and the potential for both short-term and full-semester study abroad experiences for students and faculty at both universities.

The other major partnership under development is with MalmÖ University in MalmÖ, Sweden. I had an opportunity to meet with Recktor Stefan Bengtsson in April where we both expressed an interest in widening the scope of the partnership to include many different disciplines. The College of Liberal Arts has the lead in organizing a symposium between RIT and MalmÖ University; watch for further announcements in the fall.

I also had the opportunity to visit Kyoto Computer Gakuin (KCG) and Kyoto College of Graduate Studies for Informatics (KCGI) in Japan to recognize their 50th anniversary. KCG was the first private educational institution in Japan to focus on computer technologies, and continues to excel at creating the next generation of IT professionals and industry leaders today.  KCG has had a partnership with RIT for many years and 38 students KCG students have graduated with MS degrees in information technology from RIT.

 And in October, we will be celebrating 20 years with Kanazawa Institute of Technology. Located in the beautiful city of Kanazawa, KIT is an institution sharing many commonalities with RIT. During the week of Brick City Homecoming & Family Weekend , RIT will host a contingent of KIT administrators and faculty; please watch for further information in the fall.

International education is critical to solving the challenges that face our world today, and international learning develops global cultural awareness and creates the strong leaders of tomorrow. I am encouraged by the ever-increasing participation in our global programs and look forward to mutually rewarding relationships with our new and existing international partners.

Academic Excellence

Academic excellence is fundamental to our mission and vision. The following items reflect those activities that lead to the highest quality academic programs; examples include acquiring and allocating resources, achieving accreditation, developing, evaluating, and managing academic programs, and working to achieve student learning.

Academic excellence is fundamental to our mission and vision. The following items reflect those activities that lead to the highest quality academic programs; examples include acquiring and allocating resources, achieving accreditation, developing, evaluating, and managing academic programs, and working to achieve student learning.

Academic Portfolio Blueprint (APB) Approved

After an eighteen-month process, and countless hours of effort on behalf of the Academic Portfolio Blueprint taskforce, the Academic  Portfolio Blueprint (APB) was approved by the Education Core Committee of the Board of Trustees in April.

After an eighteen-month process, and countless hours of effort on behalf of the Academic Portfolio Blueprint taskforce, the Academic  Portfolio Blueprint (APB) was approved by the Education Core Committee of the Board of Trustees in April. This document will guide the faculty and the administration as they develop academic programs over the next five years. Over the next few months, I will be working with the Intercollegiate Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Council to discuss how we might insure the proper integration of the APB into the degree approval processes.

TigerTerms: Planning for January Intersession 2014

Preparations for the first offering of January 2014 TigerTermSM courses are well underway.  On April 18, Dr. Jeff Noblett, Colorado College's associate dean of the faculty, was invited to share his 30 years of experience teaching college-level intensive courses with over 60 participants. 

Preparations for the first offering of January 2014 TigerTermSM courses are well underway.  On April 18, Dr. Jeff Noblett, Colorado College's associate dean of the faculty, was invited to share his 30 years of experience teaching college-level intensive courses with over 60 participants.  Dr. Noblett also led intensive course design and study abroad workshops on April 18 and 19, respectively.  Both events were exceptionally well-attended.  Dr. Fernando Naveda has been working with our departments and colleges to finalize the first TigerTermSM January courses.  In collaboration with the Office of Student Learning Outcomes Assessment and instructional personnel from the Innovative Learning Institute, the Office of Intersession and Summer will be offering a two day Intensive Course Bootcamp on June 6-7. Registration is now closed for this two-day event, any interested faculty should contact Dr. Naveda (jfnvse@rit.edu) with any questions regarding TigerTermSM course preparation.

Honors Curriculum Approved

The new Honors Curriculum was presented by the Academic Affairs Committee and approved by the Academic Senate at their April 18 meeting.

The new Honors Curriculum was presented by the Academic Affairs Committee and approved by the Academic Senate at their April 18 meeting. This is the culmination of years of effort by Honors Program leadership, staff and faculty and will have a profound impact on our over 700 honors students.  The new curriculum will be far more rigorous, and will include Honors foundation, research and capstone projects. The accompanying strategic plan aims to actively engaging faculty and students in the Honors Program, with the hopes of increasing both student and faculty participation in Honors-level courses.  Development and transitional plans will be completed in the coming months with an anticipated implementation date during the 2014-2015 academic year.

Graduate Education Developing Vision & Implementation Plan

In October 2012, I presented a charge to the Graduate Education taskforce and asked the cross-representational membership to develop a series of strategic recommendations that will shape graduate education at RIT for the next 8 years.

In October 2012, I presented a charge to the Graduate Education taskforce and asked the cross-representational membership to develop a series of strategic recommendations that will shape graduate education at RIT for the next 8 years. The primary goals of the taskforce are to initiate a campus-wide dialogue on graduate education, conduct research and analyze data relevant to the future of graduate education at RIT, and to develop a vision and implementation plan for graduate education that achieves the appropriate balance between imagination, risk-taking, innovation, and the wise use of human and financial resources. The final report will be finished in June and will be vetted across campus in the fall. 

Ph.D. in Engineering Announced

The president has given conditional approval to the Ph.D. in Engineering proposal, which was approved by the Academic Senate earlier this spring. The first enrollments are scheduled for the fall of 2014. This will be RIT’s 7th Ph.D. program. 

The president has given conditional approval to the Ph.D. in Engineering proposal, which was approved by the Academic Senate earlier this spring. The first enrollments are scheduled for the fall of 2014. This will be RIT’s 7th Ph.D. program. 

Year-end Update on the Eugene H. Fram Chair in Applied Critical Thinking

Since his appointment last fall, Chip Sheffield has studiously applied himself to making applied critical thinking (ACT) part of faculty’s current and developing curriculum.

Since his appointment last fall, Chip Sheffield has studiously applied himself to making applied critical thinking (ACT) part of faculty’s current and developing curriculum. He led the formation of a Faculty Advisory Board, with representation from all of RIT’s colleges and research centers, which will collaborate with Dr. Sheffield on the development of the strategic vision, guiding principles, and oversight of ACT at RIT. The kickoff in October was attended by Dr. Eugene Fram and the keynote was given by N. Katherine Hayles, an RIT alumna and professor of literature at Duke University on the topic of “Are Digital Media Changing the Way We Think?” Chip has held two successful workshops for faculty to learn how to integrate ACT into the student experience. These “lunch and learn” workshops were at capacity and even had a waiting list for participants.  I congratulate Chip on a successful and productive first year and look forward to the future evolution of critical thinking at RIT.

Faculty and Staff Success

The following items include activities which aid faculty and staff in their work and enable them to succeed. Examples include professional development programs, tenure and promotion guidance, support for the enhancement of teaching and learning, and the sharing of information through effective communication.

The following items include activities which aid faculty and staff in their work and enable them to succeed. Examples include professional development programs, tenure and promotion guidance, support for the enhancement of teaching and learning, and the sharing of information through effective communication.

Policy B2.0 Approved

The approval of Policy B2.0 (The charter for academic governance) by Academic Senate was a great accomplishment on behalf of the Academic Senate and a primary goal for the 2012-2013 Academic Year.

The approval of Policy B2.0 (The charter for academic governance) by Academic Senate was a great accomplishment on behalf of the Academic Senate and a primary goal for the 2012-2013 Academic Year. It is a triumphant end to Paul Tymann’s term as chair of the Academic Senate. Paul will be succeeded by Michael Laver (College of Liberal Arts), who was elected chair at the April 25 Academic Senate meeting.

Revised System for Student Rating of Teaching Effectiveness

After an extensive three-year review process which included two pilot studies, a new system for student rating of teaching effectiveness has been selected and will be implemented under the leadership of Fernando Naveda in the upcoming 2013-2014 academic year.

After an extensive three-year review process which included two pilot studies, a new system for student rating of teaching effectiveness has been selected and will be implemented under the leadership of Fernando Naveda in the upcoming 2013-2014 academic year. I would like to thank everyone who has been a part of this long, important process, with special acknowledgement to the academic affairs committee of the Academic Senate, who has been so engaged in this process to collect one of many important data points used to measure educational quality at RIT.

Multiple Methodologies Used for Evaluating Teaching Effectiveness

To accurately evaluate teaching effectiveness, we cannot rely on just the student ratings. Indeed, best practices in this area use multiple methods for evaluating teaching effectiveness.

To accurately evaluate teaching effectiveness, we cannot rely on just the student ratings. Indeed, best practices in this area use multiple methods for evaluating teaching effectiveness. So in addition to the work on student rating of teaching effectiveness, the colleges have been engaged in conversations on how they will use multiple methods. Some of the methods include using peer-evaluations, evaluation by chairs, a review of course materials, and the assessment and accreditation processes. While not all the colleges have completed these discussions, many have and will be using them along with the new student ratings systems next year. 

College of Science Faculty, Staff and Students Receive Awards and Recognition

I am proud to share the College of Science recipients of awards, honors and recognition for this academic year.

I am proud to share the College of Science recipients of awards, honors and recognition for this academic year. This is the second year of the COS awards, which recognize professors, lecturers and adjuncts as well as students who excel in teaching, mentoring or leadership. Please take a moment to review the list of awardees on the faculty awards website. I congratulate all of our outstanding teachers and scholars who were recognized this year—well  done!

What a year this has been for RIT!

What a year this has been for RIT! And it was made possible by all the hard work of our faculty and staff.

What a year this has been for RIT! And it was made possible by all the hard work of our faculty and staff. A special tip of the hat to all those who participate in the shared governance groups – your work has again shown that this system of guiding American colleges and universities can function extraordinarily well.

 

Of course, this year marks the end of our quarter system. With it, we say good-bye to an old friend and usher in a new era for RIT, one that will see this institution rise above the crowd and emerge truly as a one-of-a-kind university. May you have a great summer, filled with rewarding experiences.