Fence with metal grid in perspective
Genocide and Post-Conflict Justice
Instructor Rachel McGinnis
Course Number ANTH-345-01
Jan 16, 2018
Starts
15 weeks
Length
32 Seats
Remaining

The destruction and survival of societies often hinges upon the ideas and the social, cultural constructions of identity and belonging. When ideas fail to incorporate people, essentialist categories of identity, historical memory, and accounts of extreme violence become interrelated, potent sources of destruction. Slavery and exclusive ownership of resources leave people starving or living in perilously polluted environments. Globalizing cultural economies threaten local systems and self-representation. Group identities may be "sites" of crises within nation-states and global political, economic and cultural processes. In this course, we will take critical, anthropological approaches to studies of ethnocide, genocide and post-conflict justice. Students will use critical, anthropological approaches to assess ethnocides and genocides from the 19th century forced assimilation and slaughter of Native Americans and Amazonian Indians to more recent genocides in Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, and the Sudan, to understand the impact of globalization on techniques and technologies of genocides, the legal, moral/personal responsibility for genocides, media representations of genocides, and the affects of cultural, historical memory and social, global inequities upon future genocides. Students will use anthropological perspectives on genocide to assess post-conflict concepts of justice, reconstruction and reconciliation and local-global debates about their cultural resonance and effectiveness.

  • Price $936 per credit hour (2017-18 AY)
  • Credits

    3 credit hours

    This 15 week course requires students to spend approximately 9 hours a week on course work.

  • Enrollment Restrictions

    This course section is open to RIT Online students.

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