Best Practice

Security Assessment Tools

Security Assessment Tools

 

The following tools should be used in combination to conduct security assessments.

Tool

Description

Rapid 7 Nexpose (RIT Enterprise Licensed by ISO)

Unified vulnerability management enterprise solution

Nessus

Network Vulnerability Scanner

CIS Score

Security Consensus Operational Readiness Evaluation provides various security checklists.

Secunia Vulnerability Scanners

Secunia Software Inspectors provide detection and assessment of missing security patches and end-of-life programs.

Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA)

MBSA helps determine their security state in accordance with Microsoft security recommendations and offers specific remediation guidance.

Nipper

Nipper enables network administrators, security professionals and auditors to quickly produce reports on key network infrastructure devices.

Scrawlr

HP SQL Injector and Crawler. Scrawlr will crawl a website while simultaneously analyzing the parameters of each individual web page for SQL Injection vulnerabilities.

Core Impact

Penetration testing software

Qualys

Provides a suite of tools for:

  • Vulnerability Management
  • Policy Compliance
  • PCI Compliance
  • Web Application Scanning

NMAP

Nmap ("Network Mapper") is a free and open source utility for network exploration or security auditing.

BidiBlah

The BiDiBLAH utility is a framework that can be used to assist in automating existing vulnerability assessment tools.

 

Host Intrusion Prevention (RIT-owned/leased computers only)

Host Intrusion Prevention (RIT-owned/leased computers only)

Note: This requirement applies only to RIT-owned and leased computers. There is currently no requirement for personally-owned machines to run host intrusion prevention.

Currently, personal networking devices used on the RIT residential network (such as routers, switches, etc.) do not need to meet the Network Security Standard. Resnet has created separate guidelines for Using a Router/Wireless Router on the RIT Network.

The following products have all been tested by the Information Security Office and approved for use on RIT-owned/leased computers.

Recommended Host-based Intrusion Prevention Software

Server

Program

Description

OSSEC

Open source intrusion detection (multiple platforms) (ISO-tested). Active protection feature must be enabled.

McAfee HIPS

Desktop and server intrusion prevention (Windows) (ISO-tested)

Bit9

Application whitelisting (Windows) (non ISO-tested)

Cimcor

Protects against unauthorized changes (Server and Network) (non ISO-tested)

Tripwire (commercial version)

Configuration assessment and change auditing (Desktops and Servers; VMware coming) (non ISO-tested)

Desktop

Program

Description

OSSEC

Open source intrusion detection (multiple platforms) (ISO-tested). Active protection feature must be enabled.

McAfee HIPS

Desktop intrusion prevention (Windows) (ISO-tested)

Comodo

Internet Security Suite (ISO-tested)

Online Armor - Tall - Emu

Firewall (ISO-tested)

E-mail us at infosec@rit.edu if you have any questions or suggestions.

E-mail at RIT

E-mail at RIT

E-mail is a standard communication tool. Unfortunately, it is also an ideal channel for social engineering and phishing attempts; protect yourself and your information.

Managing Your RIT E-mail

Visit the ITS E-mail Services page for RIT e-mail account set-up and usage resources.

E-mail Signatures

RIT requires all communications relating to Institute academic or business purposes to be signed with an appropriate signature. This includes e-mails from both RIT and non-RIT accounts, as well as MyCourses and Message Center communications. For more information on the new requirements, visit our Signature Standard web page.

RIT Confidential Information in E-mail

When sending RIT Confidential information through e-mail, the subject line of the e-mail must state that the information is RIT Confidential, and must reference the subject. For example:

From: RIT Employee A
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 10:05 AM
To: RIT Employee B
Subject: RIT Confidential - Performance Review
Signed By: employeeA @rit.edu

Body of e-mail...........

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTE: The information transmitted, including attachments, is intended only for the person(s) or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and destroy any copies of this information.

Safe Social Networking and Blogging

Safe Social Networking and Blogging

Social networks are great. They do present some security challenges and risks, however.

This guide describes the dangers you face as a user of these websites, and provides tips on the safe use of social networking and blogging services.

Dangers of Social Networking

Many computer criminals uses these sites to distribute viruses and malware, to find private information people have posted publicly, and to find targets for phishing/social engineering schemes. Below is a short list of users who may be using the same sites as you:

Identity Thieves
Online criminals only need a few pieces of information to gain access to your financial resources. Phone numbers, addresses, names, and other personal information can be harvested easily from social networking sites and used for identity theft. The large numbers of people that use these sites also attract many online scammers.

Online Predators
Are your friends interested in seeing your class schedule online? Well, sex offenders or other criminals could be as well. Knowing your schedule and your whereabouts can make it very easy for someone to victimize you, whether it be breaking in while you're gone, or attacking you while you're out. Don't make it easy for the Facebook Stalker to find you!

Employers
More and more employers are beginning to investigate applicants and current employees through social networking sites and/or search engines. What you post online may put you in a negative light to prospective or current employers, especially if your profile picture features you doing something questionable or stupid.

Protecting Your Information - Safe Practices

Keeping your information out of the wrong hands can be fairly easy if you adopt a cautious attitude. Here are some tips to make sure your private information stays private.

Don't Post Personal Information Online!
It's the easiest way to keep your information private. Don't post your full birth date, your address, phone numbers, etc. Don't hesitate to ask friends to remove embarrassing or sensitive information about you from their posts either.

Use Built-In Privacy Settings
Most social networking sites offer various ways in which you can restrict public access to your profile, such only allowing your "friends" to view your profile. Of course, this only works if you only allow a few people to see your postings-if you have 10,000 "friends" your privacy won't be very well protected. Your best bet is to disable all the extra options, and re-enable only the ones you know you'll use. Sophos provides Recommended Facebook Privacy Settings. These best practices can be applied to any social networking or blogging website.

Be wary of others
Most sites do not have a rigorous process to verify identity of members so always be cautious when dealing with unfamiliar people online.

Search for yourself
Find out what information other people have easy access to. Put your name into Google (make sure to use quotes around your name). Try searching for your nicknames, phone numbers, and addresses as well-you might be surprised at what you find. Many blogging sites have instructions on how to exclude your posts from appearing in search engine results using something called a "robots text file." More information can be found here.

What Happens on the Web, Stays on the Web

Before posting anything online, remember the maxim "what happens on the web, stays on the web." Information on the Internet is public and available for anyone to see, and security is never perfect. With browser caching and server backups, there is a good chance that what you post will circulate on the web for years to come. So be safe and think twice about anything you post online.

Find out more about how information security affects you by becoming a Fan of the RIT Information Security Facebook page. Follow us on Twitter for updates on current security threats.

Media Disposal Recommendations

Media Disposal Recommendations

Media

Disposal Method

Paper

Use a shredder. Crosscut is preferred over a strip shredder.

CD, DVD, diskette, etc.

Use the media shredder (located at the ITS HelpDesk, 7B-1113).

Hard Drives

If the hard drive is to be reused, contact your support organization for recommendations for secure erasure.

If the hard drive is damaged or will not be reused, render the hard drive unreadable by using the degausser (located at the ITS HelpDesk, 7B-1113).

Tapes

Use the degausser (located at the ITS HelpDesk, 7B-1113).

Other

Use an industry standard means of secure disposal.

 

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