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Keeping Safe

Keeping Safe: Guidelines and Best Practices

Not sure how to keep yourself, your information, and your devices safe? Click on the headings below for best practices, resources, and more; also be sure to check out our blog for more specific content, answers to your information security questions, and best practices guides!

Subject Area

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Securing your Computer

Free downloads and instructions to support the Desktop and Portable Computer Standard.

Mobile Devices

Learn how to safely use mobile devices when dealing with Private Information or everyday use.

Phishing

Learn how to recognize these common online scams.

Safe Blogging and Social Networking

Is a potential employer reading? Learn how much information is too much and how to protect yourself on social networking sites.

Wireless Networking

Learn about wireless networking at RIT, at home, and on public networks; and the potential dangers you face.

Web Browsing Safely

Learn about the different web browsers available, add-ons that can improve security, and how to browse using limited account privileges.

Identity Theft

Did you know that people aged 18-29 are five times more likely to be victims of identity theft than those 60 or older?

Instant Messaging

Tips on how to avoid malware and scams through instant messaging.

Safe Online Shopping and Banking

How to use these popular online services securely.

Digital Copyright

Are you aware that the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) files copyright violations and has sued students at RIT? Visit the ITS Digital Copyright page to learn more about copyright violations at RIT and how they are handled.
Browser Security Configuration Outlines how to configure various security settings for common browsers.
Cloud Computing Information on secure cloud service use.

 

Identity Theft

Identity Theft

Scams and malware are not the only way criminals can steal identities. There are many ways for identity thieves to victimize you, damage your credit, steal important documents or information.

Read our Avoiding Identity Theft Online brochure to learn how to spot basic online scams and how to protect yourself.

Although online scams and malware have reached epidemic proportions, they are not the only way criminals can steal identities. Discarded bank statements, receipts, bills, etc. are also great sources for identity thieves. The Federal Trade Commission's Identity Theft page provides more information on the different methods criminals use, and the precautions you should take.

Check out our Disposal Recommendations to find the best way to dispose of any media that might contain your personal information.

Students

The U.S. Department of Education has created their MISUSED website as a resource for college students and identity theft. You can learn about how scholastic identity theft occurs, how to reduce your risk, and what you should do if you discover you're a victim. They also offer several resources for identifying scholarship scams and finding legitimate financial aid.

The Sallie Mae college loan corporation also offers advice on how to guard against identity theft.

Victims

If you think you have been a victim of identity theft, take action immediately. Contact any credit card issuers and financial institutions with whom you have an account to temporarily freeze all transactions. Contact the major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) to have them flag your file with a fraud alert. This will require any credit grantor to verify your permission before taking action in your name.

More on Identity Theft

 

Security Education, Training, & Awareness

Security Education, Training, & Awareness

Information security is a complex and constantly changing field that individuals at every level of the organization need to keep pace with in order to keep RIT information resources secure.  RIT offers the following education training and awareness programs to assist everyone from end user to system administrators to keep current with information security trends.

Academic Education

  • The GCCIS NSSA department provides a variety of information security courses at the graduate and undergraduate level.

Training

  • Orientation sessions: The ISO provides introductory information security training and materials at new student and new employee orientations. Check out the 2010 Fall New Student Orientation presentation delivered by E. Philip Saunders College of Business faculty member Neil Hair.
    Neil Hair presentation
  • Digital Self Defense training: Training specifically designed to help end users be secure. Visit the E-Learning Zone to view the current course schedule or take online training.
  • Custom training: The ISO will customize training based on a particular need.  Please contact Ben Woelk at fbwis@rit.edu

Awareness

  • Unfamiliar with information security? Our award-winning interactive website <NEED SWF>will help you learn the basics. You can also find links to videos and articles covering information security here.
  • The Information Security Office conducts a number of awareness campaigns throughout the year.
  • We communicate regularly through the RIT Message Center with Alerts and Advisories to make the RIT community aware of current threats and vulnerabilities.

Information Security Awareness Resources

  • Visit our Posters and Videos page for a selection of our current posters and to view student-produced videos from EDUCAUSE.
  • Visit the pages in our Keeping Safe section to learn how you can use the Internet safely and avoid online dangers such as phishing and identity theft.
  • Contact us at infosec@rit.edu for copies of our printed materials, including posters and brochures.
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