Student

Requirements for Students

Requirements for Students

 









Standard

When does it apply?

Desktop and Portable Computer Standard

Always

Password Standard

Always

Signature Standard

Always - All authentic RIT communications should include an appropriate signature as per the standard. Make it a habit to check for an authentic signature when receiving messages from RIT.

Web Security Standard

If you have a web page at RIT, official or unofficial, and you:

  • Host or provide access to Confidential information. If you’re hosting or providing access to Private information, contact us at infosec@rit.edu immediately. Private or confidential information is defined in the Information Access and Protection Standard.
  • Use RIT authentication services

Computer Incident Handling Standard

If the affected computer or device:

  • Contains Private or Confidential information
  • Poses a threat to the Institute network

Network Security Standard

If you own or manage a device that:

  • Connects to the centrally-managed Institute network infrastructure
  • Processes Confidential information. If you’re providing access to Private information, contact us at infosec@rit.edu immediately.

Portable Media Standard

If you are storing Private or Confidential information on portable media, such as USB keys, CDs, DVDs, and flash memory.

Networking Devices

  • Currently, personal networking devices used on the RIT residential network (such as routers, switches, etc.) do not need to meet the Network Security Standard. Resnet has created separate guidelines for Using a Router/Wireless Router on the RIT Network.

Safe Practices

  • Visit our Keeping Safe section to find security resources and safe practices and to see our schedule of upcoming workshops.

Questions

If you have questions or feedback about specific information security requirements, please contact us.

Plain English Guide to the Information Security Policy

Plain English Guide to the Information Security Policy 

RIT has issued an Information Security Policy. The Policy provides the strategic direction needed to implement appropriate information safeguards for RIT information and the Institute network. This Plain English Guide provides explanation and illustration of the Policy and is provided as an aid to help you understand and implement the requirements of the Policy. The Policy itself is authoritative. The policy is effective immediately.

Why did RIT issue the policy?

The Policy authorizes RIT to take reasonable measures to protect RIT information and computing assets in an age that is both reliant on electronic media and characterized by increasing Internet-borne threats. These measures apply to RIT information and the technology infrastructure.

In recent years, state and federal legislation have mandated specific protections for different types of information, including educational records (FERPA), financial customer information (Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act), health information (HIPAA), and private information (NYS Information Security Breach and Notification Act).

Why is the information lifecycle important?

The information lifecycle concept and its associated stages (creation, storage, transfer, and destruction) provide a useful framework for information handling. For example, during the creation stage, the creator of the information determines who should have access to the information and how that access is to be granted. During the destruction stage, "out-of-date" information or information used only occasionally may be without appropriate protection and be at greater risk.

What are the roles of Safeguards and Controls?

Most of the legislation above requires affected organizations to explain how they know people don’t have unauthorized access to information. Controls provide the best way of ensuring information protection. Controls can be process based (administrative controls), or technology based (technical controls). Controls focus on one or more of the following: problem prevention, problem detection, or problem correction.

How has RIT implemented this policy?

RIT has implemented the Information Security Policy by conducting risk assessments, issuing and enforcing standards, raising awareness of threats, recognizing best practices, and maintaining relationships with a number of security-focused external entities for benchmarking and sharing of resources.

More specifically,

  • RIT has designated specific individuals, including the RIT Information Security Officer, to identify and assess the risks to non-public or business-critical information within the Institute and establish an Institute-wide information security plan
  • The RIT Information Security Office creates and maintains standards to protect RIT information systems and its supporting infrastructure, ensure workforce information security, and guide RIT business associates and outsource partners. The creation of these standards is mandated by policy and is in response to the risks that the Institute faces. They are Institute-wide standards, created with representation from across RIT. See our Policies and Standards page for the list of current standards and information about how standards are developed.
  • The RIT Information Security Office provides awareness and training workshops, including its Digital Self Defense classes to help RIT users in the responsible use of information, applications, information systems, networks, and computing devices.
  • The RIT Information Security Office encourages the exchange of information security knowledge through ongoing engagements with security-focused groups, such as Educause, the New York State Cyber-Security Critical Infrastructure Coordination group, InfraGard, and others.
  • RIT periodically evaluates the effectiveness of information security controls in technology and process through risk assessments.

 

To whom does the policy apply?

The policy applies to the entire RIT community, including RIT employees, student employees, volunteers, and external business associates. Standards articulate how you follow the policy. Each standard has a different scope and may apply to different parts of or activities engaged in by the RIT population.

What do I have to do?

You need to follow all Information Security Policy requirements as articulated in the standards. See our Policies and Standards page for a current list of standards.

Where do I go for more information?

Read the policy and its associated standards. Contact the RIT Information Security at infosec@rit.edu if you have more questions.

 

Safe Social Networking and Blogging

Safe Social Networking and Blogging

Social networks are great. They do present some security challenges and risks, however.

This guide describes the dangers you face as a user of these websites, and provides tips on the safe use of social networking and blogging services.

Dangers of Social Networking

Many computer criminals uses these sites to distribute viruses and malware, to find private information people have posted publicly, and to find targets for phishing/social engineering schemes. Below is a short list of users who may be using the same sites as you:

Identity Thieves
Online criminals only need a few pieces of information to gain access to your financial resources. Phone numbers, addresses, names, and other personal information can be harvested easily from social networking sites and used for identity theft. The large numbers of people that use these sites also attract many online scammers.

Online Predators
Are your friends interested in seeing your class schedule online? Well, sex offenders or other criminals could be as well. Knowing your schedule and your whereabouts can make it very easy for someone to victimize you, whether it be breaking in while you're gone, or attacking you while you're out. Don't make it easy for the Facebook Stalker to find you!

Employers
More and more employers are beginning to investigate applicants and current employees through social networking sites and/or search engines. What you post online may put you in a negative light to prospective or current employers, especially if your profile picture features you doing something questionable or stupid.

Protecting Your Information - Safe Practices

Keeping your information out of the wrong hands can be fairly easy if you adopt a cautious attitude. Here are some tips to make sure your private information stays private.

Don't Post Personal Information Online!
It's the easiest way to keep your information private. Don't post your full birth date, your address, phone numbers, etc. Don't hesitate to ask friends to remove embarrassing or sensitive information about you from their posts either.

Use Built-In Privacy Settings
Most social networking sites offer various ways in which you can restrict public access to your profile, such only allowing your "friends" to view your profile. Of course, this only works if you only allow a few people to see your postings-if you have 10,000 "friends" your privacy won't be very well protected. Your best bet is to disable all the extra options, and re-enable only the ones you know you'll use. Sophos provides Recommended Facebook Privacy Settings. These best practices can be applied to any social networking or blogging website.

Be wary of others
Most sites do not have a rigorous process to verify identity of members so always be cautious when dealing with unfamiliar people online.

Search for yourself
Find out what information other people have easy access to. Put your name into Google (make sure to use quotes around your name). Try searching for your nicknames, phone numbers, and addresses as well-you might be surprised at what you find. Many blogging sites have instructions on how to exclude your posts from appearing in search engine results using something called a "robots text file." More information can be found here.

What Happens on the Web, Stays on the Web

Before posting anything online, remember the maxim "what happens on the web, stays on the web." Information on the Internet is public and available for anyone to see, and security is never perfect. With browser caching and server backups, there is a good chance that what you post will circulate on the web for years to come. So be safe and think twice about anything you post online.

Find out more about how information security affects you by becoming a Fan of the RIT Information Security Facebook page. Follow us on Twitter for updates on current security threats.

 

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