Gesture, Performance, and Embodied Story Practices

Gesture, Performance, and Embodied Story Practices

Current media practices and cross-cultural circulations of narrative and diverse story traditions have brought renewed attention to storytelling’s basis in bodies and to its unfolding through embodied relations, nonverbal gestures, and in complex conversation with physical dimensions of space, time, and environment. 

Collaborating with the National Technical Institute of the Deaf (NTID) Liberal Arts faculty and drawing on the Deaf Studies Archive at RIT, CES will work to enhance understanding and awareness of the art of American Sign Language storytelling, nonverbal story methods, gesture, interactive media, and performance. This research area will showcase innovative ASL storytelling from our creative writing classrooms and around the world; examine the importance of storytelling traditions to deaf cultures; increase accessibility and emergent possibilities for ASL and other kinds of embodied storytelling, gestural practices of communication, and performance; draw from these rich, nontextual storytelling languages and cultures to address questions crucial to narrative theory, multimodal studies, human-computer interaction, and interactive media today.