Interactive Storytelling

Interactive Storytelling

One of the primary drivers increasing interest in storytelling today is low-cost, portable, networked digital technologies and the development of easy to use, non-specialist apps for the collecting, editing, disseminating, and metadata tagging of story practices. While interactive storytelling doesn’t begin here by any means, such hand-held, mobile, networked, GPS-location technologies have prompted an explosion of storytelling practices that actively involves readers, writers, speakers, viewers, players, and listeners in multimodal narratives that link local, “real world” sites, information, participants, and data in their distributed operations.

Projects in this area of research will pursue emergent approaches to interactive storytelling with old and new media and contexts in mind, considering what distinct kinds of interactivity contribute to story. Within this broader category, research might explore interactive fiction, AR/MR/VR storytelling, locative and site-specific narrative, role-playing games, storytelling in games, digital literature, net art, digital authoring software, interactive storytelling and education, tactical media, human-computer interaction. Researchers are encouraged to explore histories and philosophies of interactivity, play, human-computer-interaction, computation, and collaboration, as well, and to pay close attention “to the specific contexts and communities – the environments and social and cultural formations that produce and consume” these narrative practices, “as well as the cultural uses to which narrative practices may be put,” as Ruth Page and Bronwen Thomas recommend in their introduction to New Narratives: Stories and Storytelling in the Digital Age (7).