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Special Session: Language Revitalization

8:00

Registration & Breakfast

9:00

Welcome remarks

 

Kevin McDonald

Vice President and Associate Provost for Diversity and Inclusion

Rochester Instituteo of Technology

 

 

PANEL ONE

 

9:15

Preserving the past: Timucuan voices in the 21st Century

Lisa Marie Noetzel, The College of Coastal Georgia

George Aaron Broadwell, The University of Florida

 

9:45

Wiki-based paradigm tools

Chris Harvey and Nicholas Welch, University of Toronto

 

10:15

A digital dictionary of Panará

Bernat Bardagil-Mas, University of Groningen

Myriam Lapierre, Andrés Salanova, University of Ottawa

Perankô Panará, Panará Nation

 

10:45

Coffee break

 

11:00

PLENARY TALK ONE

 

 

What does a university-based native language training institute do?

Ofelia Zepeda, University of Arizona

An overview of training community based Native American language teachers, learners, researchers planners and activists.  This presentation takes a look at efforts to teach practical skills as a means for supporting local tribal efforts to sustain language programs at home. The training is critical not only in providing essential skills but more importantly it can enable community members a sense of ownership and responsibility over all the work necessary in language teaching, revitalization or documentation.  The presentation will also consider the challenges of trying to successfully meet the training needs of tribal communities.

 

12:30-1:30    

 

Lunch

 

 

PANEL TWO

 

1:30

It’s time we stopped teaching students how to count and started teaching them how to talk

Brian Maracle, Six Nation Grand River Territory

 

2:00

Reducing anxiety, increasing core competence: A practical program for beginner adult heritage learners of Eastern Algonquian languages

Andrea Bear Nicholas, St. Mary's Maliseet Nation/STU

Alwyn Jeddore, Membertou/Eskasoni/CBU

Gabriel Paul, Penobscot Nation Dept. of Cultural & Historic Preservation

Conor Quinn, University of Maine

 

2:30

Onʌyote’aká Tsiʔ Nitwawʌnótʌ

Shalihókt Danforth, Ka’shatstʌslahawí Williams, Shalákwa Summers, Yutlatakwas Powless, Lataklokwátha Danforth and Yekuhsiyó Francour, Oneida Nation, Wisconsin

 

3:00

Coffee break

 

 

PANEL THREE

 

3:15

Living past death: A philosophy of language revitalization from Tuscarora

Montgomery Hill, Tuscarora Nation, University at Buffal

 

3:45

The grammar of Oneida: less is more (Room 1829)

Karin Michelson and Jean-Pierre Koenig, University at Buffalo, SUNY

4:15

 

 

4:45

Coffee break

5:00

PLENARY TALK TWO 

 

Talking about “success” in language revitalization

Leanne Hinton, University of California, Berkeley

What counts as “language revitalization”?  What do we mean by “success?”  Who decides what counts as “success”?  These questions are important precursers to any question about whether a revitalization program is “successful” or not.   Using examples primarily from our work with California Indian languages, I examine specific programs and their originators -- communities and individuals doing language revitalization.  “Success” will be seen as defined differently by different parties, frequently a product of efforts taking place below the community level, and always subject to evolving goals.  

 

6:30 

 

Dinner

 

See also: Program for Parasession: Language Documentation, Description & Theory

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