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Parasession: Linguistic Analysis, Documentation & Theory

8:00

Registration & Breakfast

9:00

Welcome remarks

 

 

Kevin McDonald

Vice President and Associate Provost for Diversity and Inclusion

Rochester Instituteo of Technology

 

 

PANEL ONE

 

9:15

The Yucatec Maya Bible: Piercing as far as the division of soul and spirit

Christine Kray, Rochester Institute of Technology

 

9:45

Inalienable possession in Tlingit

Dylan Bandstra, University of Toronto

 

10:15

Affix mobility and the factual in Oneida

Thomaz Diaz, University at Buffalo, SUNY

 

10:45

Coffee break

 

11:00

PLENARY TALK ONE

 

What does a university-based native language training institute do?

Ofelia Zepeda, University of Arizona

An overview of training community based Native American language teachers, learners, researchers planners and activists.  This presentation takes a look at efforts to teach practical skills as a means for supporting local tribal efforts to sustain language programs at home. The training is critical not only in providing essential skills but more importantly it can enable community members a sense of ownership and responsibility over all the work necessary in language teaching, revitalization or documentation.  The presentation will also consider the challenges of trying to successfully meet the training needs of tribal communities.

 

12:30-1:30

 Lunch

 

 

PANEL TWO

 

1:30

The phonetics of focus in Yoloxóchitl Mixtec

Christian DiCanio, Joshua Benn, University at Buffalo, SUNY

Rey Castillo García, Secretaría de Educación Pública, Guerrero, México

 

2:00

Copala Triqui's syntactic causative: Cosubordination across models of grammar

Rebecca Dinkel, University at Albany, SUNY

 

2:30

The role of adverbs and context in Tzutujil: A look at temporal reference

Kathryn Bove, University of Georgia

 

3:00

Coffee break

 

 

PANEL THREE

 

3:15

Makú grammar and language documentation

Chris Rogers, Brigham Young University

 

3:45

Obsolescence and attrition in Mapoyo: Challenges for documentation and revitalization

Tania Granadillo, University of Western Ontario

The grammar of Oneida: less is more (Room 1829)

Karin Michelson and Jean-Pierre Koenig, University at Buffalo, SUNY

 

4:15

 

 

 

A linguistic analysis of Iroquoian place names

Rebekah Ingram, Carleton University

 

4:45

Coffee break

 

5:00 PLENARY TALK TWO
 

Talking about "success" in language revitalization

Leanne Hinton, University of California, Berkeley

 

What counts as “language revitalization”?  What do we mean by “success?”  Who decides what counts as “success”?  These questions are important precursers to any question about whether a revitalization program is “successful” or not.   Using examples primarily from our work with California Indian languages, I examine specific programs and their originators -- communities and individuals doing language revitalization.  “Success” will be seen as defined differently by different parties, frequently a product of efforts taking place below the community level, and always subject to evolving goals.  

 

 

6:30

 

Dinner

   
   

 

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