Kaitlin Stack Whitney, Ph.D.

Job Title: 
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department: 
Science, Technology, and Society
Phone: 
585-475-5966 Office: ROS 10-A187

Dr. Stack Whitney is an environmental studies scholar with expertise in insect ecology, agriculture, and novel ecosystems/climate change. She teaches in the Science & Technology Studies department in the College of Liberal Arts, as well as the Environmental Sciences Program in the College of Science. Her research includes both science (mainly ecology) and science studies (mainly modern environmental history); she often collaborates with historians, state agency scientists, theoretical ecologists, and social scientists. She has conducted research in a wide variety of landscapes, from tundras in Alaska to mountains in Uganda. Before coming to RIT, Dr. Stack Whitney worked for the US Department of Agriculture's Farmer to Farmer Program in Eastern Europe and Washington DC, as well as the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of International & Tribal Affairs and Office of Pesticide Programs.

Dr. Stack Whitney has a professional and personal commitment to inclusive pedagogy and accessible science outreach for learners of all ages. She lives in a bilingual ASL/English household and continues to take ASL courses through NTID.

Education

PhD in Zoology
University of Wisconsin-Madison (2016)

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts in International Agriculture & Rural Development; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University (2008)

 

Popular Writing

 

How grizzlies, monarchs and even fish can benefit from U.S. highways - Ensia magazine

Planning for a Diverse and Inclusive Classroom - Edge Effects

How can early career ecologists encourage diversity in our field? - Ecological Society of America Early Career Section

Pros and Cons of the U.S. Federal Strategy to Protect Pollinators - American Scientist

6 Misconceptions About Saving the Bees - American Scientist

The Secret Pot-Growing Operations in America's Cornfields - The Atlantic

Conservation Canines: the Ultimate Wildlife Trackers - SAGE Magazine

 

 

Peer Reviewed Publications

 

Science:

  • Federica Lacasella, Silvio Marta, Aditya Singh, Kaitlin Stack Whitney, Timothy D. Meehan, Christopher J. Kucharik, Phil Townsend, Claudio Gratton. 2016. From pest data to abundance-based risk maps combining eco-physiological knowledge, weather and habitat variability. Ecological Applications. 27: 575-588.
  • Kaitlin Stack Whitney, Timothy D. Meehan, Christopher J. Kucharik, Phil Townsend, Claudio Gratton. 2016. Explicit modeling of abiotic and landscape factors reveals precipitation and forests associated with aphid abundance. Ecological Applications DOI: 10.1002/eap.1418.
  • Christopher J. Kucharik, Amelia C. Mork, Timothy D. Meehan, Shawn P. Serbin, Aditya Singh, Philip A. Townsend, Kaitlin Stack Whitney, Claudio Gratton. 2016. Evidence for Compensatory Photosynthetic and Yield Response of Soybeans to Aphid Herbivory. Journal of Economic Entomology 109 (3): 1177 – 1187.
  • Amelia C. Perillo, Christopher J. Kucharik, Timothy D. Meehan, Shawn P. Serbin, Aditya Singh, Philip A. Townsend, Kaitlin Stack Whitney, Claudio Gratton. 2015. Use of insect exclusion cages in soybean creates an altered microclimate and differential crop response. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 208: 50–61.
  • O’Rourke, Megan E., Kaitlin Rienzo-Stack, and Alison G. Power. 2011. A multi-scale, landscape approach to predicting insect populations in agroecosystems. Ecological Applications 21:1782–1791.

 

Humanities:

  • Nicole Nelson and Kaitlin Stack Whitney. “Becoming a Research Rodent.” Chapter in How to Do Things with Animals: Imagined Animal Guides for Social Tasks. Edited by Ilana Gershon. Cornell University Press. Under review
  • Stack Whitney, Kaitlin. 2015. Manoomin: the taming of wild rice in the Great Lakes region. Arcadia 2015(2): ISSN 2199-3408.

 

Dr. Stack Whitney has also co-authored 9 peer reviewed risk-benefit publications as a staff scientist for the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs.