Ahmed Hamza Headshot

Ahmed Hamza

Lecturer
Department of Computing Security
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

585-475-4314
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
152 Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester, NY 14623

Ahmed Hamza

Lecturer
Department of Computing Security
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Education

MS in computer science, Georgetown University

Bio

Ahmed lectures in the Computer Science and Computing Security departments. His PhD research is on machine-intelligence optimizations to video encoding algorithms (H.265). In computing security, he is interested in OS security, memory-resident malware, persistent threats, and modern defense circumvention. Ahmed obtained his M.S. in Computer Science from Georgetown University in 2010.

585-475-4314

Areas of Expertise
Artificial Intelligence
Malware
Non-Standard Computational

Currently Teaching

CSEC-101
3 Credits
An introduction to the fundamental issues, concepts and tools common to all areas of computing security. Topics include identifying attackers and their motivations. Essential techniques will be introduced covering the areas of anti-virus, monitoring, virtual machines, account control, and access rights management. Various security models will be investigated. Concept areas such as confidentiality, integrity, availability and privacy will be studied.
CSCI-141
4 Credits
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
CSCI-142
4 Credits
This course delves further into problem solving by continuing the discussion of data structure use and design, but now from an object-oriented perspective. Key topics include more information on tree and graph structures, nested data structures, objects, classes, inheritance, interfaces, object-oriented collection class libraries for abstract data types (e.g. stacks, queues, maps, and trees), and static vs. dynamic data types. Concepts of object-oriented design are a large part of the course. Software qualities related to object orientation, namely cohesion, minimal coupling, modifiability, and extensibility, are all introduced in this course, as well as a few elementary object-oriented design patterns. Input and output streams, graphical user interfaces, and exception handling are covered. Students will also be introduced to a modern integrated software development environment (IDE). Programming projects will be required.