Ian Schreiber Headshot

Ian Schreiber

Assistant Professor
School of Interactive Games and Media
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

585-475-4174
Office Hours
Tuesday: 10-noon and 2-4pm or by appointment via Zoom - https://rit.zoom.us/j/3811425701 or Discord - IanSchreiber#5621
Office Location

Ian Schreiber

Assistant Professor
School of Interactive Games and Media
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Bio

Ian Schreiber has been making games professionally since the year 2000, first as a gameplay programmer and then as a technical/systems designer. He has taught at a variety of schools since 2006 and has been a full-time faculty at RIT since 2014. He is a co-founder of Global Game Jam, the largest in-person game creation event in the world. He has worked on nine published titles (including video games and tabletop games) and two books on game development. His research interests include game balance, serious games, and experimental gameplay.

585-475-4174

Personal Links
Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

IGME-799
1 - 6 Credits
The student will work independently under the supervision of a faculty adviser on a topic not covered in other courses.
IGME-603
3 Credits
This course explores the pragmatic issues of creative concept development through story-boarding, pitching, prototyping and play-testing. Students will use various tools and techniques to build game prototypes that they will evaluate through play-testing in an incremental design process informed by market research and analysis.
IGME-220
3 Credits
This course examines the core process of game design, from ideation and structured brainstorming in an entertainment technology context through the examination of industry standard processes and techniques for documenting and managing the design process. This course specifically examines techniques for assessing and quantifying the validity of a given design, for managing innovation and creativity in a game development-specific context, and for world and character design. Specific emphasis is placed on both the examination and deconstruction of historical successes and failures, along with presentation of ethical and cultural issues related to the design and development of interactive software and the role of individuals in a team-oriented design methodology. Students in this class are expected to actively participate and engage in the culture of design and critique as it relates to the field.
IGME-589
3 Credits
This course will allow students to work as domain specialists on teams completing one or more faculty research projects over the course of the semester. The faculty member teaching the class will provide the research topic(s). Students will learn about research methodology to implement, test, and evaluate results of projects. Students will complete research reports and final assessments of themselves and their teammates in addition to completing their assigned responsibilities on the main projects.
IGME-599
1 - 6 Credits
The student will work independently under the supervision of a faculty advisor on a topic not covered in other courses.
IGME-622
3 Credits
This course is an in-depth exploration of the sub-field of game design known as balance. Topics include: transitive mechanics and cost/power curves; economic systems in games; probability and the psychology of randomness; pseudorandom numbers; situational balance; level/XP curves, advancement and pacing; tuning; statistics, metrics, and analytics; intransitive mechanics, game theory, and payoff matrices; and the applied use of spreadsheets.
IGME-590
3 Credits
This is intended to allow for special one-time offerings of undergraduate topics or to allow faculty to pilot new undergraduate offerings. Specific course details (such as the course topics, format, resource needs, and credit hours) will be determined by the faculty member(s) who propose a given special-topics offering.

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