Michael McQuaid Headshot

Michael McQuaid

Lecturer
School of Information
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Office Hours
1000--1145 Monday, Wednesday, Friday
Office Location

Michael McQuaid

Lecturer
School of Information
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Education

BFA, New York University; MBA, MS, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Arizona

Currently Teaching

ISTE-780
3 Credits
Rapidly expanding collections of data from all areas of society are becoming available in digital form. Computer-based methods are available to facilitate discovering new information and knowledge that is embedded in these collections of data. This course provides students with an introduction to the use of these data analytic methods, with a focus on statistical learning models, within the context of the data-driven knowledge discovery process. Topics include motivations for data-driven discovery, sources of discoverable knowledge (e.g., data, text, the web, maps), data selection and retrieval, data transformation, computer-based methods for data-driven discovery, and interpretation of results. Emphasis is placed on the application of knowledge discovery methods to specific domains.
HCIN-700
3 Credits
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an evolving field. This course is designed to study the current themes and advanced issues of HCI. Topics will vary depending upon current research and developments in the field.
ISTE-782
3 Credits
This course introduces students to Visual Analytics, or the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. Course lectures, reading assignments, and practical lab experiences will cover a mix of theoretical and technical Visual Analytics topics. Topics include analytical reasoning, human cognition and perception of visual information, visual representation and interaction technologies, data representation and transformation, production, presentation, and dissemination of analytic process results, and Visual Analytic case studies and applications. Furthermore, students will learn relevant Visual Analytics research trends such as Space, Time, and Multivariate Analytics and Extreme Scale Visual Analytics.
HCIN-620
3 Credits
Designing meaningful relationships among people and the products they use is both an art and a science. This course will focus on the unique design practice of: representing and organizing information in such a way as to facilitate perception and understanding (information architecture); and, specifying the appropriate mechanisms for accessing and manipulating task information (interaction design). This course will also explore the various design patterns (design solutions to particular problems) that are appropriate for the HCI professional. Students will need prior knowledge of an interface prototyping tool.
ISTE-262
3 Credits
This course explores how the fields of psychology, digital design, and computing converge in the design, development, and evaluation of new technologies that people find effective and enjoyable to use. Students will investigate the field of human-computer interaction (HCI), with a focus on how users' various sensory, motor, and cognitive abilities are essential to their successful use of technology. Students will be exposed to modern research methods and paradigms in field of human-computer interaction, including predictive modeling, heuristic evaluation, interpretive methods, and experimental user testing. Students will learn key design principles and guidelines and apply them to analyze existing designs and conduct a design process that is centered on human users of technology.
ISTE-432
3 Credits
Database applications have aspects that need to be considered when designing and developing larger-scale systems. In this course students will explore topics such as concurrent processing, scalability, performance, and security within the context of developing larger-scale data/base information processing systems. Programming projects are required.
ISTE-264
3 Credits
This course will explore how modern human centered computing design and evaluation methodologies can be effectively used to create high-quality and usable technologies for a variety of users. Students will learn how an initial design can be evaluated and improved through the use of prototyping and user evaluations. Students will investigate a variety of high- and low-fidelity prototyping techniques, plan an iterative design process for an application, conduct an evaluation of a prototype, and analyze the results of user testing to drive a design process. Programming is required.
ISTE-222
3 Credits
The third course in the programming sequence expanding the student’s knowledge base of higher level programming concepts including data structures, algorithm development and analysis, Big-O notation, directed graphs, priority queues, performance, and a greater understanding of how complex software can more easily be designed. Programming assignments are required.
ISTE-798
3 Credits
This IST seminar course provides an opportunity for special one-time offerings of graduate topics or allows faculty to pilot possible new graduate offerings. Specific course details (such as the course topics, format, resource needs, and credit hours) will be determined by the faculty member(s) who propose a given seminar offering.
HCIN-600
3 Credits
This course provides students with an introduction to the practical application of various research methods that can be used in human computer interaction. The course provides an overview of the research process and the literature review, and provides experience with qualitative, survey, and experimental research methods. Students will study existing research and design and conduct studies. Students will need to have taken a statistics course before registering for this class.