Computing Security Bachelor of science degree

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Overview

Preserve information assets, identify computer security vulnerabilities, and understand the forensics needed to prove an attack occurred, from identifying its origin and assessing the extent of the damage to designing strategies that ensure data recovery.


RIT’s computing security degree is a cybersecurity program that provides students with a solid foundation in programming and mathematics and an extensive selections of advanced topics from the areas of the network and system security, digital forensics and malware, software security, data security, and privacy, to cyber analytics and intelligence.

The scope of computer networks and the span of these systems increases in organizations every day. At the same time, industry and society's dependence on these technologies is growing, as is the creation of damaging software that attacks computing systems and networks. Therefore, security has become a major concern. The result is an increased need for people and technologies that can secure and protect from attack the data assets of an organization as well as the hardware and software infrastructures that house the information.

The BS degree in computing security produces professionals who understand people and processes that impact information security. In addition to possessing state-of-the-art knowledge in the preservation of information assets, students become experts in the identification of computer security vulnerabilities. Students also understand the forensic requirements needed to prove an attack occurred, identify its origin, assess the extent of the damage or loss of information, and design strategies that ensure data can be recovered.

An important goal of the major is to provide students with a level of specialization in computing security beyond what is provided by more general majors offered in information systems or information technology. This is accomplished with a foundation of courses that includes a breadth of computing disciplines and then allows the student to focus on a particular area of security such as forensics, mobile device forensics, or network or computing system security. Favoring depth over breadth, students are allowed sufficient time to explore the issues and technologies of computer and network security.

Plan of study

Students complete core courses, advanced courses, and cooperative education. Core courses include a programming sequence, an ethics course, a computer networking and system administration sequence, and foundation courses in computer and network security. Advanced courses allow students to design the focus of their information security course work.

Cooperative education

Cooperative education is a requirement of the major. Co-op is full-time, paid, professional experience that enables students to work in a variety of organizations – from small- or medium-sized businesses to large international companies or law enforcement organizations – that require computer systems or computer networks. These may be security-centric businesses (law enforcement agencies, security auditors) to users of information technology (manufacturing companies, school districts, health care). Co-op provides real-world experience and a competitive edge when applying for jobs after graduation. Typically, the first co-op occurs during the summer following the second year. The remaining co-ops may occur during the student's third year or the following summer. Students must complete the co-op requirement prior to completing their course work.

Advanced electives

Students complete six advanced security electives that expand their knowledge in one of several disciplines of security, including system security, network security, forensics, malware, secure software development, database and application security, security evaluation, or theory.

Industries


  • Internet and Software

  • Computer Networking

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Defense

Typical Job Titles

Computer Security Analyst Cyber Security Engineer
Information Security Analyst Junior Security Engineer
Malware Analyst Network Engineer
Security Analyst Site Reliability Engineer
Systems Engineer

Latest News

  • May 7, 2019

    Student poses in front of green wall.

    Cybersecurity competitions help graduate land job at IBM’s X-Force Red

    The main topic of conversation during Scott Brink’s co-op interviews was almost always about cybersecurity competitions. Luckily, Brink has thousands of hours invested in hacking competitions from his time at RIT. Brink, a 2019 graduate of RIT’s computing security program, credits those cybersecurity competitions and student clubs with helping him succeed in the major.

  • April 23, 2019

    Three researchers sit at a desk on computers.

    RIT cyber fighters go deep on Tor security

    Recognizing that the internet is not always secure, millions of people are turning to the Tor anonymity system as a way to browse the World Wide Web more privately. However, Tor has been found to have its own vulnerabilities. This has a team of faculty and students from RIT’s Center for Cybersecurity researching the extent of the problem and ways to address it.

Curriculum

Computing security, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-101
Fundamentals of Computing Security
An introduction to the fundamental issues, concepts and tools common to all areas of computing security. Topics include identifying attackers and their motivations. Essential techniques will be introduced covering the areas of anti-virus, monitoring, virtual machines, account control, and access rights management. Various security models will be investigated. Concept areas such as confidentiality, integrity, availability and privacy will be studied.
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
4
CSCI-142
Computer Science II
This course delves further into problem solving by continuing the discussion of data structure use and design, but now from an object-oriented perspective. Key topics include more information on tree and graph structures, nested data structures, objects, classes, inheritance, interfaces, object-oriented collection class libraries for abstract data types (e.g. stacks, queues, maps, and trees), and static vs. dynamic data types. Concepts of object-oriented design are a large part of the course. Software qualities related to object orientation, namely cohesion, minimal coupling, modifiability, and extensibility, are all introduced in this course, as well as a few elementary object-oriented design patterns. Input and output streams, graphical user interfaces, and exception handling are covered. Students will also be introduced to a modern integrated software development environment (IDE). Programming projects will be required.
4
MATH-181
Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MATH-190
Discrete Mathematics for Computing
This course introduces students to ideas and techniques from discrete mathematics that are widely used in Computer Science. Students will learn about the fundamentals of propositional and predicate calculus, set theory, relations, recursive structures and counting. This course will help increase students’ mathematical sophistication and their ability to handle abstract problems.
3
NSSA-241
Introduction to Routing and Switching
This course provides an introduction to wired network infrastructures, topologies, technologies, and the protocols required for effective end-to-end communication. Basic security concepts for TCP/IP based technologies are introduced. Networking layers 1, 2, and 3 are examined in-depth using the International Standards Organization’s Open Systems Interconnection and TCP/IP models as reference. Course topics focus on the TCP/IP protocol suite, the Ethernet LAN protocol, switching technology, and routed and routing protocols common in TCP/IP networks. The lab assignments mirror the lecture content , providing an experiential learning component for each topic covered.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
First Year Writing
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CSEC-201
Programming for Information Security
3
CSEC-202
Reverse Engineering Fundamentals
This course will teach students the core concepts needed to analyze unknown source code. Students will study a variety of low-level programming languages and how high-level programming language structures relate to low-level programming languages. Students will learn study tools and techniques used for both static and dynamic analysis of unknown binaries, providing the foundation for further study in malware analysis.
3
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
NSSA-221
System Administration
This course is designed to give students an understanding of the role of the system administrator in large organizations. This will be accomplished through a discussion of many of the tasks and tools of system administration. Students will participate in both a lecture section and a separate lab section. The technologies discussed in this class include: operating systems, system security, and service deployment strategies.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  MATH-241
   Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
 
  MATH-252
   Probability and Statistics II
This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. The statistical software package MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications.
 
 
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)†
4
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)‡
4
NSSA-245
Network Services
This course will investigate the protocols used to support network based services and the tasks involved in configuring and administering those services in virtualized Linux and Windows internet working environments. Topics include an overview of the TCP/IP protocol suite, in-depth discussions of the transport layer protocols, TCP and UDP, administration of network based services including the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name Service (DNS), Secure Shell (SSH), and Voice Over IP (VoIP). Students completing this course will have thorough theoretical knowledge of the Internet Protocol (IP), the Transport Control Protocol (TCP), and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), as well as experience in administering, monitoring, securing and troubleshooting an internet work of computer systems running these protocols and services.
3
CSEC-099
Cooperative Education Seminar
This course helps students prepare for co-operative education employment (“co-op”) by developing job search strategies and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of the Computing Security field with employers, alumni and current students who have already been on co-op. Students are introduced to RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education and learn about professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés and to prepare for interviews.
0
CSEC-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Students will gain experience and a better understanding of the application of technologies discussed in classes by working in the field of computing security. Students will be evaluated by their employer. If a transfer student, they must have completed one term in residence at RIT and be carrying a full academic load.
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Third Year
CSCI-462
Introduction to Cryptography
This course provides an introduction to cryptography, its mathematical foundations, and its relation to security. It covers classical cryptosystems, private-key cryptosystems (including DES and AES), hashing and public-key cryptosystems (including RSA). The course also provides an introduction to data integrity and authentication.
3
PUBL-363
Cyber Security Policy and Law
Why are we still so bad at protecting computer systems? Is it because we don’t have good enough technology? Or because we lack sufficient economic incentives to implement that technology? Or because we implement technologies but then fail to use them correctly? Or because the laws governing computer security are so outdated? Or because our legal frameworks are ill-equipped to deal with an international threat landscape? All these reasons—and others— have been offered to explain why we seem to see more and more large-scale cybersecurity incidents and show no signs of getting better at preventing them. This course will examine the non-technical dimensions of this problem—the laws and other policy measures that govern computer security threats and incidents. We will focus primarily on U.S. policy but will also discuss relevant policies in the E.U. and China, as well as international tensions and norms. The central themes of the course will be the ways in which technical challenges in security can be influenced by the social, political, economic, and legal landscapes, and what it means to protect against cybersecurity threats not just by writing better code but also by writing better policies and laws.
3
ISTE-230
Introduction to Database and Data Modeling
A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming.
3
CSEC-472
Authentication and Security Models
As more users access remote systems, the job of identifying and authenticating those users at distance becomes increasingly difficult. The growing impact of attackers on identification and authentication systems puts additional strain on our ability to ensure that only authorized users obtain access to controlled or critical resources. This course reviews basic cryptology techniques and introduces their application to contemporary authentication methods.
3
CSEC-380
Principles of Web Application Security
This course is designed to give students a foundation in the theories and practice relating to web application security. The course will introduce students to the concepts associated with deploying and securing a typical HTTP environment as well as defensive techniques they may employ.
3
CSEC-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Students will gain experience and a better understanding of the application of technologies discussed in classes by working in the field of computing security. Students will be evaluated by their employer. If a transfer student, they must have completed one term in residence at RIT and be carrying a full academic load.
Co-op
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
Program Electives
6
 
Free Electives
6
Fourth Year
CSEC-490
Capstone in Computing Security
This is a capstone course for students in the information security and forensics program. Students will apply knowledge and skills learned and work on real world projects in various areas of computing security. Projects may require performing security analysis of systems, networks, and software, etc., devising and implementing security solutions in real world applications.
3
 
LAS Elective§
3
 
Program Electives
12
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
126

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Students may choose one of the following course sequences: General Biology I (BIOL-101) and General Biology I Lab (BIOL-103); General and Analytical Chemistry I (CHMG-141) and General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab (CHMG-145); or University Physics I (PHYS-211).

‡ Students may choose one of the following course sequences: General Biology II (BIOL-102) and General Biology II Lab (BIOL-104); General and Analytical Chemistry II (CHMG-142) and General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab (CHMG-146); or University Physics II(PHYS-212).

§ Choose one of the following philosophy courses: Introduction to Moral Issues (PHIL-102), Foundations of Moral Philosophy (PHIL-202), or Professional Ethics (PHIL-306).

Accelerated dual degree options

Accelerated dual degree options are for undergraduate students with outstanding academic records. Upon acceptance, well-qualified undergraduate students can begin graduate study before completing their BS degree, shortening the time it takes to earn both degrees. Students should consult an academic adviser for more information.

Computing security, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-101
Fundamentals of Computing Security
An introduction to the fundamental issues, concepts and tools common to all areas of computing security. Topics include identifying attackers and their motivations. Essential techniques will be introduced covering the areas of anti-virus, monitoring, virtual machines, account control, and access rights management. Various security models will be investigated. Concept areas such as confidentiality, integrity, availability and privacy will be studied.
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
4
CSCI-142
Computer Science II
This course delves further into problem solving by continuing the discussion of data structure use and design, but now from an object-oriented perspective. Key topics include more information on tree and graph structures, nested data structures, objects, classes, inheritance, interfaces, object-oriented collection class libraries for abstract data types (e.g. stacks, queues, maps, and trees), and static vs. dynamic data types. Concepts of object-oriented design are a large part of the course. Software qualities related to object orientation, namely cohesion, minimal coupling, modifiability, and extensibility, are all introduced in this course, as well as a few elementary object-oriented design patterns. Input and output streams, graphical user interfaces, and exception handling are covered. Students will also be introduced to a modern integrated software development environment (IDE). Programming projects will be required.
4
MATH-181
Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MATH-190
Discrete Mathematics for Computing
This course introduces students to ideas and techniques from discrete mathematics that are widely used in Computer Science. Students will learn about the fundamentals of propositional and predicate calculus, set theory, relations, recursive structures and counting. This course will help increase students’ mathematical sophistication and their ability to handle abstract problems.
3
NSSA-241
Introduction to Routing and Switching
This course provides an introduction to wired network infrastructures, topologies, technologies, and the protocols required for effective end-to-end communication. Basic security concepts for TCP/IP based technologies are introduced. Networking layers 1, 2, and 3 are examined in-depth using the International Standards Organization’s Open Systems Interconnection and TCP/IP models as reference. Course topics focus on the TCP/IP protocol suite, the Ethernet LAN protocol, switching technology, and routed and routing protocols common in TCP/IP networks. The lab assignments mirror the lecture content , providing an experiential learning component for each topic covered.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
First Year Writing
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CSEC-201
Programming for Information Security
3
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
CSEC-202
Reverse Engineering Fundamentals
This course will teach students the core concepts needed to analyze unknown source code. Students will study a variety of low-level programming languages and how high-level programming language structures relate to low-level programming languages. Students will learn study tools and techniques used for both static and dynamic analysis of unknown binaries, providing the foundation for further study in malware analysis.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  MATH-241
   Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
 
  MATH-252
   Probability and Statistics II
This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. The statistical software package MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications.
 
NSSA-221
System Administration I
This course is designed to give students an understanding of the role of the system administrator in large organizations. This will be accomplished through a discussion of many of the tasks and tools of system administration. Students will participate in both a lecture section and a separate lab section. The technologies discussed in this class include: operating systems, system security, and service deployment strategies.
3
NSSA-245
Network Services
This course will investigate the protocols used to support network based services and the tasks involved in configuring and administering those services in virtualized Linux and Windows internet working environments. Topics include an overview of the TCP/IP protocol suite, in-depth discussions of the transport layer protocols, TCP and UDP, administration of network based services including the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name Service (DNS), Secure Shell (SSH), and Voice Over IP (VoIP). Students completing this course will have thorough theoretical knowledge of the Internet Protocol (IP), the Transport Control Protocol (TCP), and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), as well as experience in administering, monitoring, securing and troubleshooting an internet work of computer systems running these protocols and services.
3
CSEC-099
Cooperative Education Seminar
This course helps students prepare for co-operative education employment (“co-op”) by developing job search strategies and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of the Computing Security field with employers, alumni and current students who have already been on co-op. Students are introduced to RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education and learn about professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés and to prepare for interviews.
0
CSEC-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Students will gain experience and a better understanding of the application of technologies discussed in classes by working in the field of computing security. Students will be evaluated by their employer. If a transfer student, they must have completed one term in residence at RIT and be carrying a full academic load.
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
4
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
4
Third Year
 
CSEC Graduate Elective
3
CSCI-462
Introduction to Cryptography
This course provides an introduction to cryptography, its mathematical foundations, and its relation to security. It covers classical cryptosystems, private-key cryptosystems (including DES and AES), hashing and public-key cryptosystems (including RSA). The course also provides an introduction to data integrity and authentication.
3
PUBL-363
Cyber Security Policy and Law
Why are we still so bad at protecting computer systems? Is it because we don’t have good enough technology? Or because we lack sufficient economic incentives to implement that technology? Or because we implement technologies but then fail to use them correctly? Or because the laws governing computer security are so outdated? Or because our legal frameworks are ill-equipped to deal with an international threat landscape? All these reasons—and others— have been offered to explain why we seem to see more and more large-scale cybersecurity incidents and show no signs of getting better at preventing them. This course will examine the non-technical dimensions of this problem—the laws and other policy measures that govern computer security threats and incidents. We will focus primarily on U.S. policy but will also discuss relevant policies in the E.U. and China, as well as international tensions and norms. The central themes of the course will be the ways in which technical challenges in security can be influenced by the social, political, economic, and legal landscapes, and what it means to protect against cybersecurity threats not just by writing better code but also by writing better policies and laws.
3
CSEC-472
Authentication and Security Models
As more users access remote systems, the job of identifying and authenticating those users at distance becomes increasingly difficult. The growing impact of attackers on identification and authentication systems puts additional strain on our ability to ensure that only authorized users obtain access to controlled or critical resources. This course reviews basic cryptology techniques and introduces their application to contemporary authentication methods.
3
ISTE-230
Introduction to Database and Data Modeling
A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming.
3
CSEC-380
Principles of Web Application Security
This course is designed to give students a foundation in the theories and practice relating to web application security. The course will introduce students to the concepts associated with deploying and securing a typical HTTP environment as well as defensive techniques they may employ.
3
 
CSEC Undergraduate Elective
3
 
Free Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
CSEC-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Students will gain experience and a better understanding of the application of technologies discussed in classes by working in the field of computing security. Students will be evaluated by their employer. If a transfer student, they must have completed one term in residence at RIT and be carrying a full academic load.
Co-op
Fourth Year
CSEC-490
Capstone in Computing Security (WI)
This is a capstone course for students in the information security and forensics program. Students will apply knowledge and skills learned and work on real world projects in various areas of computing security. Projects may require performing security analysis of systems, networks, and software, etc., devising and implementing security solutions in real world applications.
3
 
CSEC Undergraduate Electives
6
 
CSEC Graduate Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
 
LAS Elective‡
3
Fifth Year
CSEC-742
Computer System Security
The importance of effective security policies and procedures coupled with experience and practice is emphasized and reinforced through research and practical assignments. Organization and management of security discipline and response to threats is studied. Case studies of effective and failed security planning and implementation will be examined and analyzed. The issues influencing proper and appropriate planning for security and response to attacks will be studied. To be successful in this course students should be knowledgeable in networking, systems, and security technologies.
3
CSEC-604
Cryptography and Authentication
In this course, students will learn in depth knowledge of cryptography and authentication. Students will explore various cryptography algorithms, authentication protocols, and their design and implementation. Students will work on a project to implement a cryptographic algorithm and/or an authentication protocol. The applications of cryptography and authentications in the areas of computer networks and systems and information assurance will also be investigated.
3
 
Computing Security Research Electives
6
 
Computing Security Graduate Elective
3
 
CSEC Thesis
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
156§

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Choose one of the following philosophy courses: Introduction to Moral Issues (PHIL-102), Foundations of Moral Philosophy (PHIL-202), or Professional Ethics (PHIL-306).

§ The BS degree requires 126 semester hours. The MS degree requires 30 semester hours. Students use 9 semester hours of computing security graduate electives toward both degrees.

Computing security, BS degree/Science, technology and public policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-101
Fundamentals of Computing Security
An introduction to the fundamental issues, concepts and tools common to all areas of computing security. Topics include identifying attackers and their motivations. Essential techniques will be introduced covering the areas of anti-virus, monitoring, virtual machines, account control, and access rights management. Various security models will be investigated. Concept areas such as confidentiality, integrity, availability and privacy will be studied.
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
4
CSCI-142
Computer Science II
This course delves further into problem solving by continuing the discussion of data structure use and design, but now from an object-oriented perspective. Key topics include more information on tree and graph structures, nested data structures, objects, classes, inheritance, interfaces, object-oriented collection class libraries for abstract data types (e.g. stacks, queues, maps, and trees), and static vs. dynamic data types. Concepts of object-oriented design are a large part of the course. Software qualities related to object orientation, namely cohesion, minimal coupling, modifiability, and extensibility, are all introduced in this course, as well as a few elementary object-oriented design patterns. Input and output streams, graphical user interfaces, and exception handling are covered. Students will also be introduced to a modern integrated software development environment (IDE). Programming projects will be required.
4
MATH-181
Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MATH-190
Discrete Mathematics for Computing
This course introduces students to ideas and techniques from discrete mathematics that are widely used in Computer Science. Students will learn about the fundamentals of propositional and predicate calculus, set theory, relations, recursive structures and counting. This course will help increase students’ mathematical sophistication and their ability to handle abstract problems.
3
NSSA-241
Introduction to Routing and Switching
This course provides an introduction to wired network infrastructures, topologies, technologies, and the protocols required for effective end-to-end communication. Basic security concepts for TCP/IP based technologies are introduced. Networking layers 1, 2, and 3 are examined in-depth using the International Standards Organization’s Open Systems Interconnection and TCP/IP models as reference. Course topics focus on the TCP/IP protocol suite, the Ethernet LAN protocol, switching technology, and routed and routing protocols common in TCP/IP networks. The lab assignments mirror the lecture content , providing an experiential learning component for each topic covered.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
First Year Writing
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CSEC-201
Programming for Information Security
3
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
CSEC-202
Reverse Engineering Fundamentals
This course will teach students the core concepts needed to analyze unknown source code. Students will study a variety of low-level programming languages and how high-level programming language structures relate to low-level programming languages. Students will learn study tools and techniques used for both static and dynamic analysis of unknown binaries, providing the foundation for further study in malware analysis.
3
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
NSSA-221
System Administration I
This course is designed to give students an understanding of the role of the system administrator in large organizations. This will be accomplished through a discussion of many of the tasks and tools of system administration. Students will participate in both a lecture section and a separate lab section. The technologies discussed in this class include: operating systems, system security, and service deployment strategies.
3
NSSA-245
Network Services
This course will investigate the protocols used to support network based services and the tasks involved in configuring and administering those services in virtualized Linux and Windows internet working environments. Topics include an overview of the TCP/IP protocol suite, in-depth discussions of the transport layer protocols, TCP and UDP, administration of network based services including the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name Service (DNS), Secure Shell (SSH), and Voice Over IP (VoIP). Students completing this course will have thorough theoretical knowledge of the Internet Protocol (IP), the Transport Control Protocol (TCP), and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), as well as experience in administering, monitoring, securing and troubleshooting an internet work of computer systems running these protocols and services.
3
CSEC-099
Cooperative Education Seminar
This course helps students prepare for co-operative education employment (“co-op”) by developing job search strategies and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of the Computing Security field with employers, alumni and current students who have already been on co-op. Students are introduced to RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education and learn about professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés and to prepare for interviews.
0
CSEC-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Students will gain experience and a better understanding of the application of technologies discussed in classes by working in the field of computing security. Students will be evaluated by their employer. If a transfer student, they must have completed one term in residence at RIT and be carrying a full academic load.
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
4
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
4
Third Year
CSCI-462
Introduction to Cryptography
This course provides an introduction to cryptography, its mathematical foundations, and its relation to security. It covers classical cryptosystems, private-key cryptosystems (including DES and AES), hashing and public-key cryptosystems (including RSA). The course also provides an introduction to data integrity and authentication.
3
PUBL-363
Cyber Security Policy and Law
Why are we still so bad at protecting computer systems? Is it because we don’t have good enough technology? Or because we lack sufficient economic incentives to implement that technology? Or because we implement technologies but then fail to use them correctly? Or because the laws governing computer security are so outdated? Or because our legal frameworks are ill-equipped to deal with an international threat landscape? All these reasons—and others— have been offered to explain why we seem to see more and more large-scale cybersecurity incidents and show no signs of getting better at preventing them. This course will examine the non-technical dimensions of this problem—the laws and other policy measures that govern computer security threats and incidents. We will focus primarily on U.S. policy but will also discuss relevant policies in the E.U. and China, as well as international tensions and norms. The central themes of the course will be the ways in which technical challenges in security can be influenced by the social, political, economic, and legal landscapes, and what it means to protect against cybersecurity threats not just by writing better code but also by writing better policies and laws.
3
CSEC-472
Authentication and Security Models
As more users access remote systems, the job of identifying and authenticating those users at distance becomes increasingly difficult. The growing impact of attackers on identification and authentication systems puts additional strain on our ability to ensure that only authorized users obtain access to controlled or critical resources. This course reviews basic cryptology techniques and introduces their application to contemporary authentication methods.
3
ISTE-230
Introduction to Database and Data Modeling
A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming.
3
CSEC-380
Principles of Web Application Security
This course is designed to give students a foundation in the theories and practice relating to web application security. The course will introduce students to the concepts associated with deploying and securing a typical HTTP environment as well as defensive techniques they may employ.
3
CSEC-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Students will gain experience and a better understanding of the application of technologies discussed in classes by working in the field of computing security. Students will be evaluated by their employer. If a transfer student, they must have completed one term in residence at RIT and be carrying a full academic load.
Co-op
 
CSEC Electives
6
 
Free Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
Fourth Year
PUBL-701
Policy Analysis
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
PUBL-702
Graduate Decision Analysis
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
CSEC-490
Capstone in Computing Security (WI)
This is a capstone course for students in the information security and forensics program. Students will apply knowledge and skills learned and work on real world projects in various areas of computing security. Projects may require performing security analysis of systems, networks, and software, etc., devising and implementing security solutions in real world applications.
3
 
CSEC Electives
12
 
LAS Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
Fifth Year
PUBL-700
Readings in Public Policy
An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing.
3
PUBL-703
Program Evaluation and Research Design
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered.
3
STSO-740
Graduate Science and Technology Policy
3
 
Public Policy Graduate Electives
6
 
Graduate Elective
3
 
Thesis
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
147

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Choose one of the following philosophy courses: Introduction to Moral Issues (PHIL-102), Foundations of Moral Philosophy (PHIL-202), or Professional Ethics (PHIL-306).

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 4 years of math including pre-calculus required
  • Requires chemistry or physics and strongly recommends both.
  • Computing electives are recommended

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in computer science, calculus, liberal arts; calculus-based physics, chemistry, or biology

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in computer science, engineering science, or liberal arts

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