Anthony Chirico Headshot

Anthony Chirico

Lecturer

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-6254
Office Location

Anthony Chirico

Lecturer

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, University of Buffalo; MS, Rochester Institute of Technology

585-475-6254

Currently Teaching

MCET-220
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines. Students learn to calculate unknown forces using the concept of equilibrium and free body diagrams and to calculate simple stresses and deflections for axially loaded members. Topics include forces, moments, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, stress, strain, and deflection. Examples are drawn from mechanical, manufacturing, and civil engineering technology.
MECE-103
3 Credits
This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines.
MCET-320
3 Credits
Principles of engineering dynamics and the solution of practical engineering problems using engineering dynamics are studied. The dynamic analysis of particles and rigid bodies are performed using the three fundamental analytical methods. These include Force-Acceleration, Work-Energy, and Impulse-Momentum methods. An emphasis is placed on the application of these methods to the solution of real engineering problems. In addition, this course introduces the study of vibration in a mass, spring, and damper system. Students will evaluate real problems experimentally, analytically and through computer simulation.
MECE-320
3 Credits
This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation.