Benjamin Banta Headshot

Benjamin Banta

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4488
Office Location

Benjamin Banta

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Purdue University; MA, Ph.D., University of Delaware

585-475-4488

Areas of Expertise

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Banta, Benjamin R. "Grasping Neither War Nor Peace: The Folly of Cosmopolitan Preventive War." Journal of Global Ethics 16. 1 (2020): 7-25. Print.
Banta, Benjamin R. "International Cyberpolitics." Oxford Research Encyclopedia of International Studies. (2020): NA. Web.
Banta, Benjamin R. "The New War Thesis and Clausewitz: A Reconciliation." Global Policy 10. 4 (2019): 477-485. Print.
Banta, Benjamin R. "“The Sort of War They Deserve”? The Ethics of Emerging Air Power and the Debate over Warbots." Journal of Military Ethics 17. 2-3 (2018): 156-171. Print.
Banta, Benjamin R. "Leveraging the Idea of ‘Humanitarian War’." International Relations 31. 4 (2017): 426-446. Print.
Banta, Benjamin R. "Analysing Discourse as a Causal Mechanism." European Journal of International Relations 19. 2 (2013): 317-402. Print.

Currently Teaching

INGS-101
3 Credits
Within the past three decades, planetary computerization, burgeoning media industries, and other global processes have significantly altered the ways in which we experience our local and global worlds. Global reconfigurations of time and space change our consciousness, sense of self and others, and the material realities in which we live and work. This course provides the conceptual tools to assess emerging global processes, interactions and flows of people, ideas and things that challenge historical patterns of international studies and relations. The course will introduce you to international and global processes in areas such as global cultural economies, global cities, new forms of democracy and civil society, global religions, sexualities, health, and environments, increased competition for resources, political conflict, war and terrorism. Beyond understanding the causes and consequences of global change, this course will introduce you to ethical dilemmas in global justice movements, and in transferring ideas and technologies in new global contexts.
POLS-120
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of the field of international relations. Among the topics to be addressed are key theoretical concepts, themes and controversies in the field such as: important state and non-state actors in international politics, security, economic relations between states, levels of analysis, and schools of thought.
POLS-295
3 Credits
Innovations in digital communication technologies have the potential to affect many aspects of politics and government. Beyond specific elements such as elections and delivery of government services, these developments have the potential to expand and redefine the nature of political participation and civic engagement, and to alter the structure of political power. This course examines the potential and promise of digital democracy, and attempts to separate hype from reality.
POLS-370
3 Credits
This course examines how advances in computer science, robotics, biotechnology and other emerging technologies are being applied to organized violence. Emphasized are the ways that lethal uses of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones), warbots with artificial intelligence, cyber-attacks, and other emerging technologies are changing or will change the character of war and the societies that enact it. Special attention is given to the ethical and legal dilemmas these technologies present to citizens, states, and the international community, assessing both the harm and the good that they make possible.
POLS-440
3 Credits
The ways that political communities have sought to protect themselves from others and / or expand their territory and power have had enormous effects on the development of particular ideologies, institutions, and governmental forms. Conversely, these political developments have altered the character of war. This course explores the enduring centrality of war in the generation of the modern international system. It offers a deep analysis of the nature and evolving character of war, and the way this has intersected with the evolving character of states.
POLS-485
3 Credits
This course explores contemporary issues facing the American and global political order through the lens of fiction. Particular attention will be paid to the grounds of sound political deliberation, the limitations of prudence and the theory and practice of American political principles both home and abroad.
POLS-542
3 Credits
This course will explore the process by which states disintegrate and fail, the armed conflicts that follow, and international peacekeeping and subsequent efforts to build institutions at the end of armed conflicts. It will consider cases that might include the wars of Yugoslav Succession, conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan, Africa, Syria and others. Students will consider the role of domestic and international actors, such as NATO, the US Government, the UN, and others. They will explore these efforts in readings, class discussion, debates, presentation of research, and role-playing exercises.
PROF-798
3 Credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of faculty.

In the News

  • December 6, 2023

    Computer generated image of a man with glasses and layers of images composed on top of his shirt in an artsy way.

    Generative AI is changing education

    Like many fields, the world of academia is wrestling with the challenges and opportunities presented by generative AI tools. While a few K-12 school districts, international universities, and businesses have attempted to ban the use of AI tools, RIT is acknowledging that it’s here to stay and can be used as a force for good.