David Martins Headshot

David Martins

Associate Professor

Department of English
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-6376
Office Location

David Martins

Associate Professor

Department of English
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, St. Olaf College; MA, Northern Arizona University; Ph.D., Michigan Technological University

Bio

Ph.D. Dissertation: “When ‘a soda fountain orgy may mean death’: Diabetes Education and the Rhetorics of Compliance and Responsibility” (Dennis Lynch, Director)

585-475-6376

Select Scholarship

Book Chapter
Martins, David Swiencicki and Rebecca Roja Charry. "Between “Pleasantville” and “My Way or the Highway”: Promoting Productive Discussion of Social Justice in a Globally Linked Learning Environment." Globalizing On-line: Telecollaborations, Internationalization, and Social Justice. Ed. Nataly Tcherepashenets. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang, 2015. 151-173. Print.
Journal Paper
Martins, David Swiencicki and Patrick Reed. "Transnational Writing Programs and Emergent Models for Teaching, Learning and Writing." Kairos 20. 1 (2015): Online Journal. Web.
Full Length Book
Martins, David Swiencicki (Ed.), Chris M. Anson, and Christiane Donahue. Transnational Writing Program Administration. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 2015. Print.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Martins, David. "Creating Global Partnerships Through Online International Collaborations: Resources and Examples." Navigating Global Currents Conference. Association of International Educators. Niagara Falls, NY. 4-6 Nov. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Martins, David. "Transnational Writing Programs." Annual Meeting of the CCCC. CCCC. St. Louis, MO. 21 Mar. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Martins, David. "Implications of Globally Networked Learning Environments for Writing Programs." Annual Meeting of the CCCC. CCCC. St. Louis, MO. 21 Mar. 2012. Conference Presentation.

Currently Teaching

ENGL-328
3 Credits
Exploration of the many ways in which science employs modes of persuasion, and the ways it does so differently in different cases of scientific work. Emphasis will be given to the conjunction between science and rhetoric; examples will be drawn from key figures and texts in the history of science, ongoing controversies in contemporary scientific debates, the popularization of science in public media, and the representation of science in fiction.
ENGL-360
3 Credits
This course will focus on academic writing specifically, the arguments presented in different fields and professions about issues of significance. Students will learn about the rhetorical, ethical, emotional, historical and logical elements of persuasion as they relate to written and visual arguments and they will practice making claims, providing evidence, exploring underlying assumptions and anticipating counter-arguments as they relate to different audiences. In addition to argument analyses, students will develop arguments of their own through inquiry-based essays.
ENGL-381
3 Credits
Study of and practice in writing about science, environment, medicine and technology for audiences ranging from the general public to scientists and engineers. Starts with basic science writing for lay audiences, emphasizing writing strategies and techniques. Also explores problems of conveying highly complex technical information to multiple audiences, factors that influence science communication to the public, and interactions between scientists and journalists. The course examines new opportunities for covering science (especially on the internet), important ethical and practical constraints that govern the reporting of scientific information, and the cultural place of science in our society.