Daniel Maffia Headshot

Daniel Maffia

Lecturer
Department of ASL and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Office Location
NTID (LBJ 3607)

Daniel Maffia

Lecturer
Department of ASL and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Instructional/Support Faculty

Education

BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; MA, Western Oregon University

Currently Teaching

INTP-335
3 Credits
Students will develop the ability to produce an equivalent simultaneous ASL message from an English source message. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific discipline areas include interpreting in healthcare, employment, and finance settings. Within those discipline areas, students will have the opportunity to interpret in authentic environments with both Deaf and hearing consumers. Students are exposed to self-employment business practices within the interpreting field. Students will continue to develop text analysis skills applying them to translating and simultaneous interpreting. Biomechanics and self-care issues will continue to be discussed. To progress to INTP-435 Interpreting III: English to ASL and INTP 350 Practicum & Seminar I, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
HCIA-719
3 Credits
This course will begin with an examination of the scope of practice of spoken language interpreters in health care settings and this will then be compared to the models of profes-sional deportment in sign language interpreting. From there, we will review the major paradigms in the field of translation and interpretation, that of formal or functional (dynamic) equivalence, and how the scope of practice expectations impact the interpreta-tion process. Finally, students will explore the concept of “sense” or meaning and how to convey that in a medical setting.
INTP-435
3 Credits
In this course, students will advance their skills in simultaneously producing equivalent ASL messages from English source texts. Monologic, expository texts on specific topic areas will be the focus of this course. A significant portion of the interpretation work in this course will take place utilizing speakers and audience members in authentic environments. Students will learn to manage the physical setting (logistics), and to select and use appropriate technology when applicable. Students will continue to develop their English and ASL vocabulary, interpreting analysis skills, develop team interpreting skills and increase stamina. To progress to INTP-440 Interpreting IV: Adapting to Diverse Consumers and INTP-450 Practicum and Seminar II, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-315
3 Credits
This course presents the underlying principles of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct, as well as other ethical content material. This content includes the four core principles of service professions and addressing how these principles apply to practice settings. This course exposes students to actual interpreting jobs and practitioners, providing students an opportunity to explore how professional interpreters weigh and balance these principles in their daily work, and how Deaf and hearing consumers perceive interpreters’ decision-making skills. The course will also address the distinction between normative and descriptive ethics, and their impact on interpreter’s decision-making. Students will have the opportunity to explore reflective practice techniques as a means to develop ethical judgment skills, to gain critical insight into the task of self-regulation, and as a technique to engage in self-care. The ethical constructs of demand control schema will be used as the framework for decision making. Etiquette and protocols specific to each setting will be discussed. Settings include: K-12, post-secondary, religious, healthcare, mental health, DeafBlind, performing arts, legal, VRS, VRI, and business and industry. To progress to INTP-350 Practicum and Seminar I, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-310
3 Credits
This course introduces the English to ASL and ASL to English interpreting process with a focus on text analysis and consecutive production of an equivalent target language message. Compression and expansion strategies are introduced. Students develop interpreting management strategies and diagnostic assessment skills. Students interpret monologic and dialogic inquiry and narrative text formats, while learning the interpretation process. Students also learn and integrate the features of biomechanics for interpreters to practice safe work habits. To progress to INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-350
3 Credits
The students experience a practicum placement under the immediate supervision of a professional interpreter, who functions as the students’ mentor, and the seminar instructor who functions as the students’ supervising instructor. The practicum will involve such activities as: observing the mentor and a variety of other interpreters at work; preparing videos for mentor critique; interpreting under the supervision of the mentor; and meeting weekly with the mentor to discuss the practicum experience. Additionally, practicum students will meet together, weekly, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Class discussions focus on language issues in interpretation, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, reflective practice/supervision applying the constructs of demand control schema, and business practices. Over the course of Practicum I & II, students are required to do a minimum of 5 hours of observation in the VRS setting, as well as 5 hours of observations in 3 out of 4 of the following settings: K-12, Post-Secondary, Community, & Medical settings. Course requires completing a minimum of 150 hours during practicum. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-440
3 Credits
This course addresses the significant language variation within the Deaf community and its impact on the interpreting process. This course provides students the opportunity to use different methods of meaning transfer in authentic live interpreting contexts and in other course activities. Topics include language variation within the deaf community, transliteration, interpreting for DeafBlind consumers, and working with Deaf interpreters. Students will learn strategies to adapt to the language/interpreting needs and preferences of various consumers. These skills will be achieved through both situated and service learning.
INTP-450
3 Credits
The students experience a second practicum placement under the immediate supervision of a professional interpreter, who functions as the students’ mentor, and the seminar instructor who functions as the students’ supervising instructor. The practicum includes activities, such as: observing the mentor and a variety of other interpreters at work; preparing videos for mentor critique; interpreting under the supervision of the mentor; and meeting weekly with the mentor to discuss the practicum experience. Additionally, practicum students will meet together, weekly, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Class discussions focus on language issues in interpretation, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, reflective practice/supervision applying the constructs of demand control schema, and business practices. During Practicum I & II, students are required to do a minimum of 5 hours of observation in the VRS setting, as well as 5 hours of observations in 3 out of 4 of the following settings: K-12, Post-Secondary, Community, & Medical settings. Course requires a minimum of 150 hours. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-491
3 Credits
This course is a knowledge/skills-based course that examines interpreting via distance technology including video relay and video remote interpreting. Lessons present both information and skill building activities to increase competence in video interpreting. The purpose of the course is to present factors that influence interpreting competence via distance technology and to increase interpreting competence as it applies to distance technology. In this course, students will learn federal regulations related to the VRS (Video Relay Service) industry, conversation management techniques in both ASL and English, and hearing phone norms versus Deaf video phone norms. In addition, other topics and activities will include interpreting for phone trees and recordings, ad hoc teaming, and how to apply the Demand Control Schema to the VRS/VRI setting.