Daniel Maffia Headshot

Daniel Maffia

Lecturer
Department of ASL and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Office Location
NTID (LBJ 3607)

Daniel Maffia

Lecturer
Department of ASL and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Instructional/Support Faculty

Education

BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; MA, Western Oregon University

Currently Teaching

INTP-335
3 Credits
Students develop the ability to produce an equivalent simultaneous ASL message from a spoken English source message. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific discipline areas include healthcare, employment and finance. Students will continue to develop text analysis skills applying them to simultaneous interpreting. Biomechanics and self-care issues will be discussed. To progress to the next courses in the sequence (INTP-350 and INTP-435) students must complete courses with a minimum grade of C.
HCIA-719
3 Credits
This course will begin with an examination of the scope of practice of spoken language interpreters in health care settings and this will then be compared to the models of profes-sional deportment in sign language interpreting. From there, we will review the major paradigms in the field of translation and interpretation, that of formal or functional (dynamic) equivalence, and how the scope of practice expectations impact the interpreta-tion process. Finally, students will explore the concept of “sense” or meaning and how to convey that in a medical setting.
INTP-435
3 Credits
In this course students advance their skills in simultaneously producing equivalent ASL messages from spoken English source messages. Monologic, expository texts on specific topic areas will be the focus of this course. The bulk of the interpretation work in this course will take place utilizing actual speakers and audience members. Students will continue to develop their English vocabulary, ASL vocabulary, interpreting analysis skills, develop team interpreting skills and increase stamina. To progress to the next course in the sequence (INTP-450) students must complete course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-315
3 Credits
This course presents the underlying principles of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Code of Professional Conduct and applies the Code to the various situations and settings. Students will explore how professional interpreters apply these principles in their daily work and how consumers perceive the ethical role and function of interpreters. In addition, etiquette and protocol for each setting will be discussed. Settings include: K-12, post-secondary, religious, healthcare, mental health, deaf-blind, performing arts, and business and industry. To progress to INTP-350 Practicum and Seminar I, students must complete course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-310
3 Credits
This course introduces the English to ASL and ASL to English interpreting process with a focus on text analysis and consecutive production of an equivalent message in the target language. Compression and expansion strategies are introduced. Students develop interpreting management strategies and diagnostic assessment skills. Students will interpret inquiry and narrative texts in monologue and dialogue formats. Warm-up exercises will be performed as part of the self-care regimen recommended for sign language interpreters. To progress to INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-350
3 Credits
The student experiences a practicum placement under the immediate supervision of a professional interpreter, who functions as the student's mentor, and the seminar instructor who functions as the students' supervising instructor. The practicum will involve such activities as: observing the mentor and a variety of other interpreters at work; preparing videotapes for mentor critique; interpreting under the supervision of the mentor; and meeting weekly with the mentor to discuss the practicum experience. Additionally, practicum students will meet together, weekly, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Class discussions focus on language issues in interpretation, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, situational concerns and protocols, and problem solving related to D-C Schema. Course requires a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C. (For students completing the AAS degree permission of the instructor, cumulative GPA 2.5 and in good standing; INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications with a minimum grade of C. Co-requisite: INTP-335 Interpreting II and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English) (For students completing the BS degree permission of the instructor, cumulative GPA 2.5 and in good standing; INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications, INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English with minimum grades of C)
INTP-440
3 Credits
This course introduces the skill of transliterating simultaneously from a spoken English message into an equivalent signed message incorporating an appropriate combination of ASL and English features. The focus of the course will be the analysis of the macro- and microstructures of the source language and the production of a target language this is sensitive to contact language situations. Topics include language variation within the deaf community, role and function of a designated interpreter, the features and process of transliteration and transliteration skill development including work with frozen texts.
INTP-450
3 Credits
This course is a continuation of the field experience for interpreting students. This course provides the student with in-depth experiential education under the supervision of a professional interpreter who functions as the student's mentor. The 15-week practicum consists of a minimum of 135 hours and will focus on gaining experience interpreting. The student may select a practicum placement in the post-secondary, K-12, or community setting. Additionally, students will meet two hours weekly in seminar, with other practicum students, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Seminar discussions will focus on advanced language issues in interpretation, application of professional and business ethics, situational concerns and problem solving. The seminar instructor will be the practicum student's supervising instructor. Course requires a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
INTP-491
3 Credits
This course is a knowledge/skills-based course that examines interpreting via distance technology including video relay and video remote interpreting. Lessons present both information and skill building activities to increase competence in video interpreting. The purpose of the course is to present factors that influence interpreting competence via distance technology and to increase interpreting competence as it applies to distance technology. In this course, students will learn federal regulations related to the VRS (Video Relay Service) industry, conversation management techniques in both ASL and English, and hearing phone norms versus Deaf video phone norms. In addition, other topics and activities will include interpreting for phone trees and recordings, ad hoc teaming, and how to apply the Demand Control Schema to the VRS/VRI setting.