Ehab Altaji-Alfarouqi Headshot

Ehab Altaji-Alfarouqi

Adjunct Faculty

Ehab Altaji-Alfarouqi

Adjunct Faculty

Bio

Education:
B.S., International Relations, St. John Fisher College
M.S., International Relations, St. John Fisher College
M.S., History, SUNY College at Brockport
M.S., Philosophy of Education, St. John Fisher College

Teaching interests:
Middle Eastern cultural studies and politics, modern and ancient Middle Eastern history, Islam and its impacts on the Middle East and the world, Middle Eastern relations with the West

Research interests:
conflict resolution, comparative politics, international security, class structure, class conflict, religion, higher education, international sociology, international economic systems and trade

Currently Teaching

ANTH-365
3 Credits
With a focus on everyday life in families, communities, and nations, we examine the diverse cultures and peoples of the Middle East in the context of political and economic forces that have shaped their lives in the past and present. We examine European colonialism and its modern-day legacies, including ethnic inequalities, economic vulnerability, labor migration, urbanism, and social unrest. We look at how art, music, oral traditions, and literatures have engaged critically with the forces of political change and neo-colonialism. We consider political activism, religious diversity, changing experiences and expectations of women and men, rebellion, revolution, and war, and the impacts of and creative responses to globalization. The cultural, political, social, and religious dynamics of Middle Eastern peoples will be discussed from a humanistic perspective.
HIST-140
3 Credits
This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in modem Middle Eastern history. Such themes include the influence of the world on the Middle East, the various political, religious, and social movements in the Middle East, and cultural and civilizational aspects of Middle Eastern societies. This course will also study cultural encounters and exchanges between the Middle East and the rest of the world, including the era of colonialism and the nationalist reaction. And finally, students will gain an understanding of the many conflicts in which the Middle East is embroiled as well as their historical antecedents.
ANTH-275
3 Credits
This course examines the spread of Islam beyond its origins in the Middle East, and the cultural and social clashes, but also the mutual adjustments that have followed. This course explores core tenets of Islam, but also how its practices and beliefs are altered as practitioners in different countries alternately adopt, co-opt, massage, react to, and reject elements in accordance with the meaningful social, cultural, and political lives they build for themselves. The compatibility of Islam with Western society is often debated in contemporary public discourse. This debate is typically marked by an assumption that Islamic beliefs clash with Western secular democratic ideals, an assumption which results in tensions over mosque building, headscarves, and other public signs of Islamic faith. We will explore the diverse ways of being Muslim from a cross-cultural perspective and the sometimes-challenging negotiation of fulfilling these religious tenets while living in Muslim-minority places.