Jodie Ackerman Headshot

Jodie Ackerman

Lecturer
Department of ASL and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf

585-270-6624
Office Location

Jodie Ackerman

Lecturer
Department of ASL and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Instructional/Support Faculty

Education

BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; MS, Gallaudet University

Bio

Prior to joining the faculty at National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Jodie taught at Bloomsburg University and Lamar University. She taught courses at all levels of ASL; Deaf Culture; ASL Literature; Introduction to Deaf Studies; DeafBlind Interpreting; and Deaf Culture independent studies. She also supervised Pre-Interpreting Field Experience and Practicum. In addition, Jodie developed a new ASL VI course and revised several other courses, including ASL I & II, Deaf Culture, and ASL Literature.

Jodie is currently pursuing an Ed.D degree in Deaf Studies and Deaf Education from Lamar University with a focus on the lived-in experiences of Deaf Women Breast Cancer Survivors.

Jodie’s major academic interests include teaching ASL as a first and second language, Deaf Culture, and DeafBlind Interpreting, as well as her research in Deaf Women Breast Cancer Survivors.

In her current position, she teaches ASL courses to students in RIT’s Modern Languages and Culture ASL program. In addition, she serves as the Team Leader for ASL I and Assistant Coordinator for New Signers Program.

Jodie enjoys skydiving, skiing, reading and watching movies.

585-270-6624

Currently Teaching

MLAS-201
4 Credits
ASL I includes linguistic features, cultural protocols and core vocabulary for students to function in basic ASL conversations that include ASL grammar for asking and answering questions while introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about family, friends and surroundings, and discussing activities. This course is designed for students who have no knowledge of American Sign Language. Students must take placement exam if this is their first RIT class in Sign Language and they have some prior study of Sign Language.
MLAS-202
4 Credits
This course expands the basic principles presented in ASL I. ASL II teaches students to use linguistics features, cultural protocols and core vocabulary to function in basic ASL conversations that include ASL grammar for giving directions, describing, making request, talking about family, occupations and routines, and attributing qualities to others.
INTP-440
3 Credits
This course addresses the significant language variation within the Deaf community and its impact on the interpreting process. This course provides students the opportunity to use different methods of meaning transfer in authentic live interpreting contexts and in other course activities. Topics include language variation within the deaf community, transliteration, interpreting for DeafBlind consumers, and working with Deaf interpreters. Students will learn strategies to adapt to the language/interpreting needs and preferences of various consumers. These skills will be achieved through both situated and service learning.
NASL-200
3 Credits
This course is designed for deaf and hard-of-hearing students who have completed ASL I (or the equivalent) and can participate in a basic conversation in American Sign Language. ASL II includes the linguistic features, Deaf cultural protocols and core vocabulary for students to function in ASL conversations that include ASL grammar for asking and answering questions and relaying short narratives while describing people and objects; attributing qualities to others; discussing hobbies; explaining procedures; spending money; discussing weather; and discussing important life events. Classroom and homework activities include practicing conversations, learning about Deaf Culture and Deaf Community, working with DVDs, viewing sign language on film, and being filmed.
HCIA-750
3 Credits
This course is for health care interpreting students to learn how to work with the diverse Deaf community. The course begins with a discussion of current perspectives in Deaf Studies including the Deaf Gain paradigm and Social Justice Theory relevant to medical interpreting. Current research on deaf individuals’ health knowledge, health literacy, and health outcomes are presented. Class discussions will focus on working with deaf individuals fluent in foreign sign languages, minority Deaf populations, deaf individuals with special needs, deaf-blind individuals, deaf interpreters, deaf students, and deaf professionals. Students will develop skills interpreting for some of these deaf individuals.