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Nicole Scott

Portrait of Nicole Scott
Co-Director (Navajo)
585-475-4213

Nicole Scott

Nicole Scott is Diné (Navajo) and grew up on the Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona. She is of The Red Running Into Water Clan (Táchii’nii), born for the Big Water Clan (Tótsohnii).

As the Co-Director for the Native American Future Stewards Program (FSP), she oversees the recruitment of Native American students to RIT, the implementation and effectiveness of the program, as well as provides academic and social support to FSP students. Nicole is also an advisor to two of the Native American student organizations at RIT: American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) and the Native American Student Association (NASA).

In 2011, Nicole received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ). In 2013, she made the move to Rochester to begin her work with the Future Stewards Program. In 2016, Nicole received her Master of Science degree in from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Dr. Jeffery Burnette

Co-Director
585-475-2807

Dr. Jeffery Burnette

Dr. Burnette is the oldest son of an enrolled member of the Onondaga Nation and received his Ph.D. in economics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2005.

As Co-Director of the Native American Future Stewards Program he works to maintain and build the relationship between RIT and the American Indian community. In his role as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology he teaches courses focused on the Economics of Native America, Native Americans in Film as well as the Economics of Women and the Family.

His current research examines the role education, location and occupational segregation play in explaining the differences in economic outcomes that currently exist for the American Indian population.

Dr. Roger Dube

Dr. Roger Dube
Director of Research (Mohawk)

Dr. Roger Dube

Roger R. Dube, Professor in the College of Science and Director of Science Exploration, has been at RIT for 6 years. He is a faculty member of RIT’s Future Stewards Program. He is Principal Investigator (PI) for the NYS CSTEP grant, and is PI for an NSF REU grant, “Imaging in the Physical Sciences”. Roger seeks to actively engage students in research during both the academic year and the summers. One of his major accomplishments is the successful Iroquois White Corn Project at Ganondagan, although he was only one of several key people on that.

Roger holds a BA from Cornell in physics, and a PhD in physics from Princeton. His career has included professorships at Caltech, University of Michigan, University of Arizona, and now RIT. He continues as an entrepreneur, having started 2 successful businesses, and is a past member of the Licensing Executives Society. He is faculty mentor for RIT’s student improv organizations.

In addition to the Future Stewards Program, Roger has served as a reviewer of applications for graduate fellowships for the National Academy of Science’s Ford Foundation Fellowships. He has served on the boards of Friends of Ganondagan and the Fallback Improv Theater.

Dr. Wilson Silva

Portrait of Dr. Wilson Silva
Associate Professor of Linguistics

Dr. Wilson Silva

I am a field linguist with formal training in theoretical linguistics and language documentation. I have carried out research projects (including fieldwork) in Amazonian languages (Sateré-Mawé [Tupian], Tikuna [isolate], and Desano, Arapaso and Karapanã [Eastern Tukanoan]). My research on these languages covers a variety of topics of theoretical interest. Besides the scientific contribution to linguistic theory, my research projects are also committed to endangered language documentation (i.e., adequate grammar, dictionary, and abundant texts to represent the language in many of its use), and linguistic and cultural revitalization.

My Ph.D. dissertation is a typologically informed description of the phonology and morphosyntax of Desano, entitled A Descriptive Grammar of Desano, under the supervision of Dr. Lyle Campbell.

T. Jane Doctor

Portrait of Jane Doctor
Assistant Director FSP/NTID Tribal Education (Tonawanda Seneca)

T. Jane Doctor

Jane Doctor is from the Seneca Tribe of the Iroquois Confederacy, Wolf Clan from the Tonawanda Reservation which is one of the nations in the Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse) near Akron NY.

Jane has been an active member of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) community since 1993. In addition to her role as Sr. Mechanical Technician in the Engineering Studies Department at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), she is also the Assistant Director of the office of NTID’s Tribal Education, under RIT’s Native American Program, the Future Stewards Program. She is also a member of the President’s Native American Advisory Council for RIT. In past years, Jane has served as Secretary, and President on the Board of Directors of the RIT Women’s Council. After the presidency, she served as Liaison for Margaret’s House. She has been involved with numerous volunteer events that RIT participates in, as well as her own interests in the community.