Series: A Graduate Student’s Guide (On-Campus Jobs)

by Rashmi Jeswani, Information Science and Technologies MS student

I thought of starting a series called ‘A Graduate Student’s Guide’ that will include individual blogs about finding on-campus jobs, looking for a co-op, and several more! The first one in the series is ‘A Graduate Student’s Guide to finding on-campus jobs’!

After I paid my $300 deposit last summer and decided that RIT was the perfect place for me, I began to explore the numerous resources and opportunities that the university had to offer. After some research, I stumbled upon ‘Handshake’: the online job portal for the university that lists details about the various on-campus jobs as well as internships and co-op listings. I was lucky enough to stumble upon a listing called the ‘Graduate Liaison’ at the Graduate Enrollment Office offering a great working environment and decent pay; I immediately applied for the job knowing that it was only a few months that I arrive at the university and had an interview scheduled for as soon as I came to the country. All this prior research helped me in landing one of the best on-campus jobs which have massively helped me take care of my personal expense whilst pursuing my masters.

A lot of people ask me about the best ways a student can find and land good on-campus jobs; this blog talks about the different ways one can look for jobs on campus and the several jobs available on campus that best suits their interests and helps take care of financial liabilities as an international student.

Research on Handshake 

Handshake is RIT’s online job portal. Almost 90% of the employers on campus post job listings on the portal where the students have to upload their resume as well as other requested documents. These students are then shortlisted by employers and contacted for further interviews. Employers actively post job listings on the portal hence if one has to look for the best jobs on campus, Handshake is your go-to portal.

It is a simple but powerful search tool and alert system that helps students find the best fit for jobs (on as well as off campus) and internships posted by 300,000 companies, non-profits, and government organizations.

Visit this link to access Handshake. (Please note that the portal is only accessible to students after they have paid their $300)

Dining Services 

RIT Catering manages tons of events both on and off-campus and they are always looking for people who are friendly, punctual, and ready to help bring food and drinks to some of the most exclusive RIT events! Lots of the events that RIT Catering handles take place on campus for art gallery openings, club and organization meetings, and even the annual president’s ball which gives you an awesome chance to meet new people ranging from faculty in some of RIT’s academic colleges all the way up to RIT’s current president! Catering also is responsible for lots of the food at the RIT hockey games so chances are that landing a job here means you will get to watch lots of games for free! Dining Services offers the most number of jobs on campus and they are relatively easier to land. Students can look for postings on Handshake or simply visit a dining facility and ask for open positions.

Note Taking

Because RIT shares a campus with NTID (the National Technical Institute for the Deaf), many classes will require a designated Note Taker for some of our deaf or hard of hearing students. People need to be very reliable for this position because you are not allowed to miss any classes. This person, normally a student, clocks in before their classes, takes notes on the lecture, submits the notes, and then clocks out. Because note takers work during their class time, you end up feeling like you are being paid to go to class and if you already take good notes then this might be the perfect job for you!

Teaching/Research/Graduate Assistants

After their first semesters at the university, a majority of graduate students end up finding graduate/teaching/research assistantships under their professors that provide them exposure working with experienced people in the industry or gives them an opportunity to research in their field of interest. These jobs offer a fixed stipend or tuition waiver opportunities and are one of the favorite on-campus jobs for students that look impressive on the resume as well.

Each department offers a certain number of graduate assistantships to the students at the start of the fall semester. Teaching and Research Assistantships are offered by particular professors and they are to be approached directly.

I ended up finding a Lab Assistant opening at the Information Sciences and Technologies department through a friend who was graduating that semester. Through his recommendation, I was able to bag an interview with the Head Systems Administrator for the department and ended up getting the job. Recommendations work wonders when finding any kind of job (whether on campus or off campus) and one should always be on the lookout for such opportunities through friends, colleagues or mentors.

Peer Advisor Leaders/Student Government/Global Union Ambassador

Several students organization at RIT like the International Student Services, Global Union and the Student Government offer several part-time opportunities to the students interested in being a part of such organizations. The ISS offers the positions of graduate assistants and Peer Advisor Leaders (PALS) that offer their services during the orientation period and help incoming students with a smooth transition into the university and the life in the US. Global union ambassadors perform similar duties year-long on campus. Student government offers certain positions as well (eg. the graduate senator) to students interested in holding a certain amount of power and responsibility among the student body. Listings for these jobs are sent out through emails and special postings on-campus groups or handshake.

Holi@RIT

By Goral Kansara, Engineering Management ME 

Holi, the Hindu festival of colors symbolizes the victory of good over evil. It is one of the most cheerful and fun festivals in India. While many students have made this big change in their life by coming to a different country, RIT makes sure that their students do not miss their home country and feel the same amount of joy by celebrating Holi at the campus. The festival was organized by the OASIS student chapter at RIT.

While the entire Rochester is struggling to adjust themselves in long winters and unpredictable weather, RIT students managed to pick a warm day in Rochester and do complete justice to the day by celebrating Holi. At around noon, everyone got together in one of the open areas on campus and there were colors and joy all around.

Holi specifically marks the last full moon of the Hindu calendar’s lunar month, Phalguna. So, it is celebrated on a different day every year but usually, it is around March when it is very warm in India. So, if you were in India to celebrate Holi, it begins with a group of people gathering around and playing drums and singing along with firing wood to symbolize the triumph of good over evil. This is known as “Holika Dahan”. On the next day, all areas and the streets will be covered in colors as people will throw a bunch of colors to each other and also the water balloons.

The Holi celebration at RIT was totally beyond my expectations. There were vibrant color powders as you would use if you were in India. The brighter the better! They made an artificial the water guns were also there. Not to forget the food! There were free samosas too. The entire arrangements were very good and it was indeed a good feeling as people danced their hearts out and played Holi as if they were in their home country.

Year in Review

As the semester comes to a close, I wanted to reflect on this past year. I have learned

Take a walk through the tunnels and you’ll find some great art!

in so much in what has felt like a short amount of time. Not only did I learn a lot through my classes but I have also learned a lot about Rochester itself. I have made friends, ate great food, and experienced new places and experiences. One of the best parts about being an RIT student is not just the classes that I have taken but the memories that I have created. From my first time trying Turkish food to visiting the beautiful parks in the area to watching my first live hockey game, there has not been a shortage of things to do. I have also learned so much in my classes. Before attending RIT, I had not been in a classroom in two years! There was definitely a bit of learning curve trying to ease myself back into the swing of things. Here is what I felt helped me the most getting through this semester and hopefully it helps you too:

photo credit: https://www.ntid.rit.edu/ambassadors/about-ritntid/

  1. Time-management. I cannot stress this enough, as a student, father, and husband, I have had to balance my time and responsibilities in order to be successful at all three. My tip for time management: make productive use of your free time. Now, that is not to say that you should spending every free second studying, what I mean is that use your study time as an opportunity to be focused solely on studying. You should also make time to do things that you enjoy and socialize but do neither in excess. It is difficult but I have found that by finding balance that I have been able to do well at a variety of things instead of just one. 
  2. Connect with your classmates. This is very important because you want to have a social life and people who are going through the same things that you are that you can vent to. It is also great to have a friend in class who can share notes with you, study with you, and help you through your struggles.
  3. Sleep. I know you may feel like that all-nighter will help you but trust me it won’t. You’ll regret it. My first semester, I sacrificed sleep so that I could get more work done. I pulled all nighters and would sleep from 2:00am to 6:00am basically everyday. I got sick repeatedly because of this. It was also not necessary. By learning to manage my time I have been able to get as much work done, if not more and have been getting a lot more sleep. Again, I cannot stress this enough: all-nighters are not worth it.

This may seem difficult at first and possibly even a little broad but I believe these three things are the most important takeaways I have as first year graduate student. I hope this helps you even little bit as you go through grad school or learn techniques that work best for you. Graduate school is not easy but I can say wholeheartedly that it is worth it.

Discovering Rochester

by Rashmi Jeswani, Information Science and Technologies MS student

If you’re new to Rochester, there are plenty of spots to go to check out in the surrounding areas! Here is a list of my favorite places to hang out, get away from campus for a bit, or go out for lunch and dinner.

During the past year, I have had the opportunity to go out on dinners and lunches with my friends and discover the great food (and coffee!) that the city has to offer. Some of those are mentioned below:

Han Noodle Bar 

Hands down one of the best place to grab some Asian food in the city. Very affordable, nothing over $13 with a variety of Asian cuisine! Check out the pork belly buns and crab rangoons. You won’t be disappointed. Located next door to Dogtown.

Dorado

Small room vibe, nice outdoor seating on Park Ave. Excellent Mexican food and the best margaritas in town for those of age.

Sultan’s Lebanese Cuisine and Bakery

This place serves Middle Eastern classics like shawarma and savory flatbreads in counter-serve digs with a warm vibe. If you ever visit, definitely try their Chicken Shawarma Pita wrap and Shawarma plate or you can also order this online through GrubHub!

 

Genesee Brew House

Iconic brewery and restaurant in Rochester overlooking High Falls. Excellent burgers, accompanied brews from the oldest brewery in NY if you are of age.

Osaka Sushi

All you can eat sushi, expensive but very fun if you want to treat yourself or go out with a group. It’s about 10 minutes from campus. Side note, all you can eat is about $10 if you go for lunch!

 

Royal of India

There are a number of Indian restaurants in the city but this one has to be my favorite in terms of its resemblance to the food we get back home. They have $10 all-you-can-eat lunch buffets and a special dinner buffet on Wednesday nights! This place is a treat for people who love Indian cuisine. Royal of India is located in Park Point.

If you get sick of the 7+ different places to get coffee at RIT’s campus, feel free to go to some of these locations. These are spots I have picked because they have tables and are study friendly places, with tables available to work at. A quick drive, with a nice place to study off campus and keep buzzing. All are within 20 minutes from campus.

Spot Coffee

Wide open tables which are great for meeting with a group to study or work, great coffee and also good, affordable food as well!

Glen Edith

Smaller building than Spot coffee, but also very good for meeting with study groups or for projects. Very brightly lit and good modern aesthetic.

Java’s 

The original Java’s downtown, so if you like the coffee at Java’s on campus, go check this place out. Also very study friendly, or a good place for a date.

 

A trip to the Hindu Temple of Rochester

Being a Brahmin and growing up in an orthodox Brahmin Community, I was, literally, no more 200 meters away from a Temple. Having said that, It has been 6 months since I last went to a temple, this might not seem like a big deal, but a bit of background on myself will make you understand the magnitude of this.

I come from a lineage of orthodox Brahmins and my family is a direct descendant Hindu Saints. I basically grew up learning sacred Vedic literature near a huge temple called “The Parthasarathy Temple” which is one of the 108 sacred places in the Hindu literature. My family is an orthodox brahmin family, although I, myself, am not very orthodox to speak, and visiting the temple daily, as my dad puts it, is as important a duty as attending college every day, and I get reprimanded heavily if I skip it. But of course being bought up in a modern world, I barely orthodox but I do get some peace of mind by visiting temple especially when life gets tough.

TL;DR, my culture’s sacred ancient literature basically says that as a Brahmin, I must do my duties to god every day, not just only when I want to get an A+ in my next midterm or pass that paper I messed up because I had to watch that episode of Game of Thrones before a midterm, don’t tell my Intelligent Systems professor.

Hindu temple of Rochester

Now that you know why it is such a big deal not visiting any for 6 months, let us talk about the trip. It was a New Years day called “Ugadi”, at least that’ s what my roommates called it, on April 6th, different cultures in India have different calendars. So my roommates decide that we take a trip to the Rochester Hindu Temple which was due for a long time. This semester has been a hard one for each one of us, we were being bombarded with projects, assignments, quizzes, and midterms on all sides and we needed a stress buster and this trip came at the perfect time.

The temple was only a few miles away from RIT. The temple was smaller than we expected but on a big piece of land. The architecture was similar to the temple architecture that you would see in Northern India. There were 7 deities in total. The temple’s environment was very calm and peaceful. They also had a wonderful set up of miniature statues that depicted the entire epic of Ramayana. We spent a few hours there sitting and meditating. I felt a tinge of nostalgia which was soon eradicated when I got a message in myCourses dropbox saying I had a project due in 2 day. Overall, I had a wonderful and the trip got me geared up for the final phase of the semester.

#myRITstory- Yashowardhan Soni

Yashowardhan Soni is a second-year grad student in Computer Science. He moved to the United States in spring 2017 and just like many other students, he also faced difficulties in terms of adjusting in a totally different country and in academics. His dedication and hard work helped him to perform well and go beyond his own expectations and he ended up with 40% scholarship after the 1st semester at RIT. During his graduate studies, he worked as a grader for prof. Borrelli for foundations of computer science theory. Even after performing so well in grad school he was having trouble in finding a good co-op and internship because of the lack of professional experience which is a common problem with most graduate students. The frustration went even worse for Yashowardhan when he got rejected from one of the big companies in their final round of interviews. This had made him give up for around five to six months until got an internship offer from Matrixcare. Despite the lack of experience, the company was willing to bet on his skills.

Matrixcare was a game changer for him. He developed Alexa skill for healthcare software in a short duration. His work was praised by the entire company when he gave a demo of the software in company meetings. Meanwhile he also cleared an interview for a co-op at Amazon where he worked on languages and technologies that he had never used. He performed exceptionally well in implementing projects before the deadlines with technologies that he never used. This impressed the engineering team at Amazon and the result of his hard work was what a computer science grad student would want. He got hired for a full-time position at Amazon, San Francisco. This journey truly makes us believe that there are no secrets to success, it is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.

Summers in Rochester

by Rashmi Jeswani, Information Science and Technologies MS student

Three months can feel like a dreary long time without work or classes; while some students prefer leaving for a vacation home, some still stay here because of research, classes, or just convenience. If you do choose to stay, it can be a really fun time, especially if you have friends here too. It’s very hard to find a week during the semester where there ISN’T a festival going on somewhere in or around Rochester.

Here’s a bunch of things you can do to make your summer’s enjoyable or productive, or both!

The Rochester Lilac Festival (May 10-19, 2019)

The Lilac Festival happens near the beginning of May, right when finals get out. This is a really great way to start the summer off and is even good for people who are not staying at RIT for the whole summer but haven’t gone home yet after finals. This is an art, music, and food festival with a huge number of lilac bushes spread around Highland Park. This is a must for anyone staying over the summer! There are always cheap concerts downtown throughout the summer! The Sunflower Festival also takes place towards the end of the summer at Wickham Farms (which has a bunch of things going on year-round). This is a festival of fun with games, food, a corn maze, and as you can guess, a ton of sunflowers.

The Rochester Public Market

The Rochester Public Market is a great place for so many reasons during the summer. It’s open throughout the year, but it’s packed during the summer with local farmers selling fruits, veggies, meat, beer and wine, and baked goods. The produce here is super cheap, and you get to support the local farmers! They also have food truck festivals here once a month with over 20 different food trucks and live music. They also have a bakery, coffee, olive oil, and cheese shop inside, and there are a ton of restaurants right next door. My favorite is Boxcar, which has really good fried chicken, donuts, and Korean fried cauliflower. You can also volunteer here at Flower City Pickers to help sort unwanted food from the farmers!

Darien Lake Theme Park

Darien Lake is a great spot, and it’s only about an hour away. This is an amusement park with rides, a water park, and concerts. The park has a ton of rides, and usually, the lines are not long at all, especially if you go on weekdays. When I went, I went on each ride at least 3 times there were so little people there. The stage in the park also has big concerts all the time too!

The city of Toronto

Toronto is also 3 hours away, and while it’s not IN Rochester, it’s an awesome city if you’re willing to drive there. The people are super nice, the food is diverse and delicious, and there a ton of things to do there as well. This is a perfect place to go during the summer when you have free time. You can also take a ferry directly from the city to enjoy the scenic beauty of Lake Ontario and get to your destination faster!

Museum Trips 

For art junkies who wish to explore exhibits from the Colonial times, Rochester has a lot of cool museums in store for you guys! The Strong Museum is the only collections-based museum anywhere devoted solely to the study of play, and although it is a history museum, it has the interactive characteristics of a children’s museum making it the second largest museum of that type in the United States.

The George Eastman Museum is world-renowned for its collections in the fields of photography and cinema, the museum is also a leader in film preservation and photograph conservation, educating archivists and conservators from around the world. Home to the 500-seat Dryden Theatre, the museum is located on the estate of entrepreneur and philanthropist George Eastman, the founder of Eastman Kodak Company.

The Strong Museum of Play

The George Eastman Museum

Summer on Campus

You can also be productive! Many people use their free time to take classes over the summer. This makes your semesters a little easier if you get that class out of the way. A lot of students choose to do research on campus too over the summer. Sometimes this is paid, and many people will write papers, publish something about their research, or end up presenting what they worked on too. Working on campus during the summer can also help you save up some money while still being able to enjoy with your friends and explore all the fun things Rochester has to offer.

Rochester has a ton of stuff to do over the summer, so if you’re here you’ll definitely have a great time!

Turkish food

This weekend I had the pleasure of eating Turkish food for the first time at one of the best restaurants I’ve been to in Rochester at As Evi Turkish Cuisine. It’s nice to have some options that don’t always get accurate representation in cuisine. When the opportunity to try Turkish food presented itself, I just couldn’t turn it down.

The restaurant is a bit far from RIT and there aren’t any RIT buses that go this far out but if you have car and a willingness to commute then I highly suggest making the trip, especially if this is the first time you’ve had Turkish food.

As soon as you walk into the restaurant you feel as though you’ve crossed over from Rochester to Turkey. The restaurant is decorated with traditional Turkish decor, not the stuff you find from pottery barn that is mass produced, but beautiful pieces of pottery and artwork that are obviously hold a depth of tradition and meaning. The ambiance is great, the owner and employees are kind, and the food tastes like it is from another world.

Juicy, tender meat in bold sauces that can’t be found elsewhere on a bed of perfectly cooked rice pilaf and grilled vegetables. I got the iskender kebab, which is difficult to describe, but consists of thin shaved beef gyro meat covered in a spicy tomato gravy mixed generously with yogurt and grilled peppers. It’s the chef’s specialty and it’s easy to see why. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in visiting the restaurant. My wife got the chicken kebab, which was grilled with a dry rub of spices and served with a side of rice. Also, if you’re a big eater like myself then you’re in for a treat, the portion sizes are very generous. Even if you don’t finish it all in one sitting, the food makes for great leftovers.

Overall, the dinner was amazing. However, what really set them above the rest was

Best Baklava I have ever had!

their baklava. The baklava was warm and coated with chewy nuts. There was even syrup on the bottom with a nice crisp bite of phyllo dough on top. Texturally, it was the best baklava we had ever tasted. The nuts were minced perfectly, and the coating of syrup was not too overpowering, tasting faintly of rose water. It was topped off with crushed pistachios, which complemented the flavors of everything quite well. 

Between the phenomenal service, fair prices, and unique cuisine, it’s difficult to think of reasons why we won’t make As Evi Turkish Cuisine a regular staple in our restaurant rotation.

Best and quietest places to study on campus

Throughout your time at RIT, you will be searching for quiet and private places to study and complete your projects. I mean, let’s be honest, when it comes to studies the majority of us tend to get distracted a lot. Also, I don’t want some random guy to stare at my computer in a cafe and come to the conclusion that I am pitiful at coding, I mean that’s what I have my TAs and graders for. So, therefore, during my first two semesters at RIT, I went on a hunt to find the quieter and calmer places on campus for a proper study session.

You might wonder, “Wait! Hold up their sparky! Isn’t the library exactly the place for this ?”. Well, the first and second floors of the library are kind of noisier because they are meant for discussion and group studies. Although the third and fourth floors are designated quiet floors, they get filled up very fast and if you are looking for a private place and quiet place to immerse yourself in studies or complete your assignments with the least distractions, you would need to get a spot in the library very early in the mornings. Also with the rumors that the fourth floor of the library is going to be converted into an office, the traffic on the third floor might increase significantly. As someone who is always on the hunt for quieter and warmer places to study at RIT, I bring to you my top 5 picks on the same:

  1. Third and Fourth floors of Wallace Library: I know, I know! After just stating that the library sees a lot of traffic, I post it as my first pick. You might call me a hypocrite, but come on, it’s called a library for godsakes, it has to be somewhere in the picks. Here’s the deal, if you are going to spending long hours, the third and at least temporarily, the fourth floors are the best places to be. The hardest part of using the third and fourth floor is not the noise level but is about getting your spot. My advice would be to go to the third floor at least an hour before lunchtime. I usually prefer the north wing of the third floor that faces Gleason Circle. It’s the least distractive, and the most spacious. Also, the best part is that the library has rollable couches, which you can just drag your and get comfy. There is an unsaid rule about the quiet floors of the library, people would try their not to sit on a table if it’s already occupied. This means, if you get a table, you are most likely to get the entire table for yourself, at least for the majority of the time.  The fourth floor is, even more, quieter than the third but is less spacious. You can, of course, book a study room, but they have time limits and therefore, not suited for long hours.  Another understood law of the library is that the more floors you climb, the quieter it gets.

    North Wing, 3rd Floor of Wallace Library

  2.  Golisano Institute for Sustainability: Ah yes! The best building at RIT in terms of aesthetics: modern look, orange tinge, huge building, but you what’s even better? You could barely find more than 20 people in the whole building for the most part of the day. Looking for a quiet place to do a phone interview? This building is a godsend for that. Unlike the third and fourth floors of the library, where you would need to minimize your talks, this place offers a huge advantage. You can talk more freely and it’s always quiet, sometimes so quiet that you might hear echoes. Also, not to forget the beautiful terrace garden.

    The spacious Sustainability building, RIT

  3. Crossroads after 8 pm: This is my favorite place at this moment. I, sometimes, prefer it more than the library. It has that mild music in the background, food, very spacious, open till and after 7 PM, one of the most peaceful environments on campus to complete your assignments. It’s crazy because it’s actually very spacious and you would not find a place to even sit during lunch time as it will be packed with people, but it gradually gets better as we move towards evening.  Love it especially because you can grab a bite anytime you want.

    Crossroads at night

  4. Institute Hall: Another place close to the sustainability building. Haven’t spent a huge amount of time over here. The third floor is the quietest. I found the place completely by accident, one of my seniors told me to go to the sustainability building to study, though this place was the building, got lost, which was quite embarrassing considering the fact that I was with my crush and half the building was made of glass and literally, transparent and eventually got to the third floor only to find out the next day that it wasn’t the sustainability building.
  5. Lounge at the James E. Booth building: To be honest, the entire building 7 which is made of Booth 7B and Gannet 7A are calm places most of the days. I haven’t personally spent a lot of time in either of these places but was recommended by a senior. I used to go there for the chess club and sometimes found it to be eerily quiet.

Now, there are more places on campus like the Orange Hall which also have lower decibel levels, but I haven’t had sufficient experience with these places to recommend them. Also, there places in the SAU and GCCIS, but they are pretty inconsistent because of the possibility of university events occurring at these places. I don’t want you to plan a study session over there only to find out that it’s packed with people at which point you decide to add me to your hit list (too much movie nights for me).

Bonus: Looking for a place to nap? Fear not, the student government has got you covered, with an exclusive map which also gives you a measurement of quietness. You could convert these places to study as well, but the one problem is that some of these places have a lower number of ports or a higher number of students snoring.

Now, all the places mentioned above are from my own experience. If you believe, they are not as quiet as I mentioned, I recommend the below solution:

 

A Taste of Italy

Growing up in New York City, I didn’t have a Wegmans or a Walmart growing up. Places like Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods didn’t explode in popularity until the last ten years or so, and for many, those places were too expensive to shop anyways. I became used to

It was a beautiful day for some cannolis!

relying on corner stores and small markets for staple goods but also for things that are new and exciting. I never thought I would find something like that out of New York City, especially in the Rochester area, but I was wrong. Rubino’s Italian Market is everything and more. They have everything you are looking for, there it be ingredients or meals. They have imported dry goods like pasta and risotto, and my wife was marveling at the olive oil selection like a kid in a candy store. I felt the same way as her once we got to the bakery section. Rainbow cookies, sfingi, and cannoli all under one roof? It’s a no brainer. And I’m still basking in the beauty of their “cannoli cookie sandwich” which is sweet cannoli cream in between two chocolate chip cookies. I’ll take ten, please. If you’re trying to cook an old school Italian meal, this is the place to go. Or, if you don’t feel like cooking, but you want to eat an old school Italian meal, you’ve also come to the right place! They have a full selection of hot foods like pasta, chicken dishes, arancini, and roasted vegetables. Their hot items are available for purchase as a meal, and they also sell cold versions packaged up to be heated at home. Rubino’s is a small space (when you consider everything they have in there!) but they have filled it to the brim with a wide variety of foods. They have specialty sausages which are Rochester-renowned; a rotating selection changes based on seasons and right now they have a lamb sausage available. There’s also a regular meat counter where you can get cuts of beef, chicken, and other proteins. There’s a separate deli meat counter where you can order cold cuts and cold salads, like tortellini salad, a variety of pasta salads, and their selection of imported olives is more impressive than Wegman’s. If you want a deli sandwich, they have those too, they even have their own version of a garbage plate sub. Part of the charm of going to those little corner stores were the personalities working there, and at Rubino’s it’s no different. The family-owned business has many employees in the store that have been working there across generations, and their knowledge and their kindness know no limits. If you’re looking for an Italian product, it would be surprising if Rubino’s didn’t have it. Their selection and service are a rarity nowadays, and I have no doubt that I will continue going with my family for years to come.