#myRITstory – Antoinette Defoundoux

In honor of International Women’s Day (this Friday, March 8th) we’re proudly featuring the stories of #RITWomen this week. Join us Friday morning at 9 a.m. for a webinar featuring our female students and staff as they discuss RIT history, opportunities for women in STEM, and RIT’s curriculum, research, and campus life. Register today!

Antoinette Defoundoux-Fila is from the Republic of Congo in Central Africa and is passionate about helping people. She has always wanted to work in the health field, and for a long time wanted to become a medical doctor. Since starting her studies at RIT, her new passion is to work in the research and develop medical devices. She is currently pursuing her MS degree in Manufacturing and Mechanical System Integration and is avidly working on her capstone project with her adviser, Dr. O’Neil. Antoinette’s project focuses on the redesigning of jet nebulizers (medical devices that are used to treat respiratory diseases) to make it adaptable to a hand cranked compressor. This system will be used in low income countries where access to electricity can be difficult hence making an electric compressor useless. Their work involves redesigning the nebulizers to make sure that the medicine droplet size stays the same dosage when using a hand cranked compressor.

When she is not in class, Antoinette is busy with the Women in Technology (WIT) group on campus where she can give (and receive!) support from other STEM women on campus and the program leader, Nykki Mathews. This serves as a place of motivation and support for her, where she can always seek help and get advice through weekly meetings and the other resources available.

Antoinette also has a passion for helping younger women become interested in STEM fields. Her favorite RIT event is the Girls in STEM fair. During the fair, female students of all ages (kindergarten to high school) from local schools come to RIT to enjoy a day of educational activities put together by female engineering and science students and professors. Antoinette loves the event because it “shows that science and technology can be fun, but also, at the end of the day a lot of those participants want to pursue a career in engineering or science.”

Antoinette will be leaving RIT this spring, but wants others to know what a special place RIT is, especially for women. “There is a club for everybody at RIT. This diversity helps students find a sense of community and belonging in whatever club you identify with.”

.Learn more about RIT’s Manufacturing and Mechanical Systems Integration MS program here.

#MyRITstory- Ajinkya Shinde

Ajinkya Shinde is a second-year graduate student at RIT. He began his journey as a grad student in January 2017 in the field of Electrical Engineering, but his passion laid in robotics and automation. This made him transfer to the Manufacturing and Mechanical Systems Integration (MMSI) department. The smooth shift between the departments helped him to take a step forward towards his passion in automation. It is truly said, “everything comes with a cost”, it was difficult for Ajinkya to get familiar to the mechanical terms as he had his background in electrical engineering, but his interest and dedication made him come over all those obstacles and perform exceptional in his current field of study.

Selection of courses and managing them in the time limit that you are given is another challenging part of a grad life. After he changed his major, he took the classes and electives in a way that can earn him degree in two of the different concentrations that are provided by the department. So, he could know more about Electronics Manufacturing and Advanced Concepts of Semiconductor Packaging.

The greed to achieve more encouraged him to push himself harder and in 2018, he started working as a Teaching Assistant for a Biomedical Engineering course, Control Systems. This was just the beginning and a step towards success. After that semester working as TA, he is currently working as a Graduate Research Assistant for Dr Martin Anselm. The research is in the field of Photonics. He is also working as a Vice President of SMTA (Surface Mount Technology Association) RIT Student Chapter. Thus, he has been successful in achieving and exploring all possible opportunities that he could at RIT and is hoping to explore more in the future. From the experience as a grad student, Ajinkya says that hard work and perseverance are the foundation to be a successful person”.

Learn more about RIT’s MMSI department.

Learn more about the SMTA Student Chapter at RIT.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#myRITstory – Rashmi Jeswani

In honor of International Women’s Day (this Friday, March 8th) we’re proudly featuring the stories of #RITWomen this week. Join us Friday morning at 9 a.m. for a webinar featuring our female students and staff as they discuss RIT history, opportunities for women in STEM, and RIT’s curriculum, research, and campus life. Register today!

Rashmi Jeswani, Information Sciences and Technologies MS

My name is Rashmi Jeswani and I come from the town of Indore located at the heart of India. I am currently a Masters student studying Information Sciences at RIT. I recently switched majors from Business to Information Technology and I am glad I chose RIT for that. I love reading; it is one of my most favorite things to do. I have recently discovered skiing and hiking after coming to the states and I have fallen in love with that.

Coming to RIT was a massive change in my life as I had never lived away from home and my family and this has to be one of the most challenging things I have ever had to do.

I arrived at RIT last fall and plan to graduate in the May of 2020.

I love exploring new places to eat and hang out on campus and have quite a few favorite spots on campus. Some of them have to be the ‘study pods’ on the third floor of the Wallace Library if I have to doze off after a long night of submissions or concentrate on a tough assignment, the Fireside Lounge when I want to hang out with some friends and get work done amidst great music playing on the piano and of course Java Wally’s for their amazing Shot in the Dark and small snacks!!

The thing that I love the most about RIT is that I have developed a sense of freedom and individuality ever since I have arrived here. The ability to manage things on my own and be responsible for my actions and learn from my mistakes. Also, the plethora of resources at RIT have enabled me to learn a lot of things outside the classroom: at my jobs, with the professors, with my peers etc.

The primary reasons that I chose RIT were the courses that I was offered, the Co-op program and the scholarship that I was offered. I had heard really good things about the university, the campus life, employment opportunities, the city of Rochester and I actively decided to pursue my masters at the university.

During my last semester, I got the opportunity to present an idea for a project to one of my professors. The idea was ‘Business Intelligence Tools for Inventory Management and Scalability’. My professor seemed to love the idea and still actively supports and guides me to try and work towards turning this idea into my final capstone so soon into my masters!

In the long run I want to see myself working as a Data Analyst for a reputed firm anywhere in the world and develop tools that can bring about a reasonable change in the lives of the people around me. This is my ultimate career goal, to do what I love doing!

There are a bunch of things that I love the most about RIT. I LOVE the campus, I love the snow (even when people will argue it is something that they hate), I love the two jobs that I am working and most of all I love that I am studying and doing what I have dreamed of doing for so long at RIT. The great places on campus, the amazing people that I have met since the first day that I came to Rochester, the sense of belonging, the resources offered by the university and how everyone is constantly motivating and helping you to strive for the best in your career makes me more passionate every day to go out and work even harder for it even when if I fail sometimes.

Learn more about RIT’s MS in Information Sciences and Technologies program here.

 

 

 

 

 

#myRITstory – Alyssa Recinella

In honor of International Women’s Day (this Friday, March 8th) we’re proudly featuring the stories of #RITWomen this week. Join us Friday morning at 9 a.m. for a webinar featuring our female students and staff as they discuss RIT history, opportunities for women in STEM, and RIT’s curriculum, research, and campus life. Register today!

Alyssa Recinella, PhD in Engineering

Q: When did you begin your degree program at RIT?

A: I started as a Bachelor’s student in Engineering Exploration back in 2011. I eventually picked mechanical engineering and joined the dual degree BS/MS program back in 2015. I graduated in December 2016 and began my doctoral program in January 2017.

Q: What is your expected date of graduation?

A: Currently, May 2020. But it all depends on funding! My degree may be extended by a summer or a semester. But the goal is to finish either in May 2020 or December 2020.

Q: Do you have a favorite spot on campus?

A: I have a few! I love doing homework in Java’s. I enjoy sitting by the windows in the engineering building to watch the rain or snow while I’m reading or having a conference call. Finally, I really enjoy the Fireside Lounge with a good cup of coffee and some music, especially when the fire is going.

Q: Do you have a favorite RIT event? Why?

A: Oh man, hockey!!! Who doesn’t love hockey? I grew up watching the Detroit Red Wings and I’ve loved watching the Tigers the past few years, especially in the new Polisseum!

Q: Are you involved in any clubs or groups on campus?  Do you have a special role in that group?

A: During my undergrad I was very involved in Engineers for a Sustainable World and InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. I had a few different leadership roles in both clubs throughout the years. Now I’m the president of the Doctoral Student Association on campus.

Q: What do you enjoy most about RIT?

A: There’s something for everyone. Want to go into the Greek system? We have it. Want to build machines that shoot foam balls? We have it. Want to play with Legos or build fake roller coasters? We have it. Want to stay in your room and play video games while a robot brings you soda? We have it.

Q: Have you completed a Co-Op? If so, how was your experience with the process?

A: I’ve had 4 different co-ops. All of them were diverse and ranged in expectations and experience. But one main factor they all had in common = it is what you make it. If I didn’t have work to do, I made work to do. And other teams became interested and I was recognized by more people. I was in new cities with no one that I knew and ended up with long-term connections and great experiences. Go in open minded of everything! You may not enjoy the work you’re doing but that doesn’t mean you have to have a bad time. You have now learned that you don’t quite enjoy that line of work but maybe you learned some awesome software or technical skills along the way. Stay positive!

  1. Research Assistant, Machinist, DesignerThermal Analysis, Microfluidics and Fuel Cell Lab at RIT – January 2014 – August 2014
  2. Thermal Engineer – IBM – January 2015 – August 2015
  3. Thermal Engineer – Carrier Corporation – May 2017 – August 2017
  4. Oncology Intern – Rochester Regional Health – May 2018 – August 2018

Q: Why did you chose RIT?

A: So many reasons. I had a lot of criteria when choosing colleges but the top 5 most important were the following:

  1. Co-op Program (RIT’s program is just incredible and that’s a fact)
  2. Finances (scholarship, tuition costs, housing costs in the area, etc.)
  3. Distance to home (for me, not too close, not too far away)
  4. The Engineering Program (ease of transfer into other disciplines, amount of other disciplines, esteem of the program compared to other schools, hands-on curriculum, etc.)
  5. Size of the school (I was looking at schools that had 2,000 people and looking at schools that had 50,000 people; RIT was a happy medium)

Q: Do you have a Research/Thesis/Capstone project you are excited about? Can you share some details.

A: Absolutely! I’m currently studying breast cancer detection techniques. We’re studying a non-invasive, no contact, no radiation method called Infrared Imaging. Although there is controversy with the FDA around this technology, most of it is based on the fact that there isn’t a lot of scientific evidence or exploration backing the technology. So for my dissertation, we’re trying to prove that this is a valid method that should be considered through in-depth scientific exploration and clinical trials.

Q: Do you have a specific career goal? If so, what?

A: Absolutely not. I know I want to work in Research and Development somewhere but I’m completely open when it comes to the field and the organization. I’d preferably either like to work in a National Lab, in industry (like a start-up) or in a government facility (NASA or the DoD)

Q: What are you most proud of/passionate about at RIT?

A: The answer to this question has changed every year that I’ve been at RIT. At the moment, I’m immensely proud of the growing PhD programs at RIT and my involvement in the Doctoral Student Association (DSA). We’re trying to get doctoral students in all different disciplines to collaborate in multidisciplinary activities, expose our programs to more local companies and alumni, get students out of the lab for some good free food and games and finally bring more people to the downtown area to serve the Rochester community. The DSA is a brand new organization on campus and I’m so proud to see how far it’s come in the past 2 years.

Q: In your opinion, what about RIT provides a sense of community?

A: I think there are certain activities or events on campus that make everyone feel proud to be here. But the biggest aspect is what I said above: there’s something here for everyone. People feel like they belong. We don’t all necessarily belong to the same groups but all the groups belong to RIT. And when people are happy within their own spaces, they feel closer to the campus and to the community.

For more information about RIT’s Engineering PhD program, or to explore other graduate school options, review our program list here.

Time and Stress Management

Before we start off, I would like to say that this post wasn’t just constructed from my own experience or opinion but after talking to a lot people, coming from different professional and educational program, people who have either struggled to adapt to their new grad life, people who are moving so easily through the program that it’s almost unfair, (seriously do you guys have some kind of a cheat code?), and people who have altogether quit. Don’t worry too much about the last case, they are few and far between. One thing, I want to you guys to recognize is that Graduate Studies is like going to the gym if you think just going there and starting at the treadmill will magically make you more fit, trust me been there done that and it doesn’t work. Similarly, just attending graduate school isn’t going to make you magically an expert unless you put in the work. Graduate School is a guide and means of achieving expertise. Also, to my fellow international students, remember that you are in a new country, a new environment, so don’t worry if it’s hard at the beginning, it is supposed to be and your professors will understand that. At RIT, every graduate department has tons of resources that will help you grow, every program has been designed carefully taking the needs of the students and the current trend in the field into consideration.

Graduate School is a guide and means of achieving expertise.

Now, not all graduate programs are the same, in fact, you will come to realize that not every class for a particular subject are the same, as the course structure will vary significantly depending on the professor. With that in mind, although I am a graduate computer science student, I will try to keep this as generic as possible. I am pretty sure you guys are fed up with my ramblings by now, so shall we get into the actual points (and a bit more rambling) that I want to drive home?

Time Management:

This is one of the most essential points I want to convey. You can easily overcome almost 40% of the challenges you will face if you can properly manage your time. You will have projects, midterms, homework, quizzes, research papers, and you will have at least two of these every week for all your classes. Apart from this, I can’t stress this enough, you must spend time studying and reviewing what the concepts covered before and after your classes. Trust me, you would be making your life significantly harder if you think you can do an overnight homework or a last-minute study for your midterms, forget the finals. If you are working on campus, you would need to take that into consideration too. Some of you might think managing time is easy, well unless you have a graduate degree in time management (if it one exists), everyone both undergrad and grad students in the USA struggle with it. Learning when to jump at new opportunities and when to say no to extra tasks is a skill which every academic should develop if they are to avoid going mad. So how do you cope up with this? That brings me to my next point.

Planning:

Plan your work. Most of your project/homework deadlines will be given at least 2 weeks ahead, plan early on how to proceed with them and try to stick to the plan. Most people develop some plan or the other, but the problem actually arises from not being following the plan. So, stick to your plan guys. Also, make sure the schedule is flexible, life isn’t a play with scripts. Something important activity may suddenly come up that must be accommodated. Also, make sure you plan gives you a decent period to rest and is within reasonable expectation. It isn’t reasonable to think you can finish a week load of assignments in two days, so you can Netflix and chill. I have seen one of my roommates try that only to fail miserably where he “Netflix and Chilled” a little too early, only to find he had read the problem wrong while in a hurry to complete the homework. Evaluate your limits before you plan. You may be a slow coder or a fast learner, consider your strengths and weaknesses and make sure your plan reflects that. Make sure you include daily activities like cooking, laundry, and housekeeping in your plan. Make sure you have time for a proper meal 3 times a day.

Every student has access to RIT’s myCourses, where all your deadline will be listed, if not, check your professor website. You can set alerts for your deadlines, most of the times they have alerts by default.

Prioritizing:

Doing a project that is 10 days when you have a midterm in the next two days, is not working smart. You will have to learn to prioritize your work and I don’t mean prioritizing Netflix over an assignment. You might decide to prioritize based on the nearest deadline or based on which homework you feel is the hardest among different courses. Sometimes you can altogether avoid prioritizing if you stick to plan. Setting out enough time in your day to fulfill your tasks will help you with this process and enable you to, when necessary, say “nope, I literally do not have enough time to do that”. Prioritizing is nothing but working smart. Check myCourses regularly, sometimes your deadlines could be postponed thanks to your Professor, at which point you shift your priority.

Procrastination:

Do not procrastinate! Seriously, you will be overwhelmed if you procrastinate even for a day, not joking on this. I have done this, everyone has, and everyone regrets it. Tomorrow always seems like a better option until you see your grade pop up on myCourses.

Stress Management:

I can’t stress this point enough (see what I did there?). Stress is one of the most common hurdles in life and it’s no different in graduate school. Stress is a very important issue as it can sometimes lead to depression if not properly managed. What causes stress in a graduate student? Well, that depends on you, I personally get stressed on almost everything. There are people who don’t get stressed even if it’s the end of the world. I would suggest you to not be in either of those categories. There is no way to avoid it, what you can do is try and manage it.

RIT offers an array of services under the Tigers Care program to help with the stress, if you ever feel overly stressed out or depressed, I would suggest you make use of the services. They offer counseling and consultation, 5 days a week except for the weekends. There are many activities conducted regularly throughout RIT for stress management. One of my favorite stress-busting activity is hanging out with the therapy dogs. They visit the Wallace library many times during a semester. Another method to cope up with stress is to join clubs. There are a huge number of clubs at RIT and they will welcome you with open arms. Most of the clubs have a weekly meeting, join them, make new friends, there is no better way to deal with stress other than to hang out with your friends. Want to take a quick Nap? Look no further than Naps.rit or as I would like to call it, NapZzz. Naps.rit brings you the best napping spaces around campus. Knowing where to nap on campus is perfect for those moments when you need to unwind between classes. You can find more information about these various facilities in the links provided at the very end of the post.

Therapy Dogs at Wallace Library

Be Responsible:

Most of you might be new to Rochester, heck even the entire country. You will definitely want to visit new places, go for parties, enjoy life outside of academics, which you should but remember the purpose you are here for. You will have breaks in between the semester to spend time on your favorite leisure. So, remember to focus on your goals first, achieving them should be the first priority. Success doesn’t come overnight, it comes with hard work and sacrifice. Everything in life follows something I call the “law of equivalent exchange”, one cannot gain anything without giving something in return, success is rarely gained without sacrifices and hard work. RIT is a university where hard-work will not go unnoticed, work hard and you will reap your rewards at RIT. That said, it is also very important to relax when it’s time to. Do not burn yourself out by overworking. Find a balance.

Everything in life follows something I call the “law of equivalent exchange”, one cannot gain anything without giving something in return, success is rarely gained without sacrifices and hard work.

Graduate school is the place where ignorance will not be forgiven. Don’t involve yourself in activities or controversies that you shouldn’t even be near to, like Academic Dishonesty in particular. This is very serious guys, I might even write a blog about it next time. Don’t copy solution for your homework from others or from the internet. Don’t even think about it. Every University in the US has very strict academic dishonesty rule. It is a crime, as simple as that. In RIT, especially in the Computer Science program, if you ever get involved in it, you better start packing your goods because you won’t be staying here for much longer. It has happened to some of my classmates, it happens in every department and in every semester. A huge percentage of your orientation will be based on it. So, you cannot plead ignorance. Therefore, be responsible, if you need help with your homework, talk to your professor or TA, they will gladly help you out. It is better to admit you don’t know how to proceed with a problem statement than to use a solution that isn’t yours and make a career-ending decision.

Aside from the above, sometimes all that is required is proper motivation. There will be days where you will feel tired, days where will not be feeling like getting out of bed, days where you might question yourself whether all this worth your effort. In such cases, all you have to do is think of your purpose of attending graduate school in the first place. Focus on your, focus on your family, your parents, all the sacrifices you did or your family did in order to get you here. Use that as the motivation for your hard work. RIT provides a ton of facilities from start-up incubators to 24-hr labs.

I decided to make this post after witnessing a lot of people failing to find work-life balance. I, honestly, believe this stems from some of the above mentioned factors. It’s ok to make mistakes, you will make mistakes, but you should learn to pull yourself up after each fall. Graduate school isn’t just about studies, you will learn a lot of life that will stick with you throughout your life. That said, learn to enjoy your new grad life, you will learn a lot of cool things, meet a lot of new people and 10 years from now you might look back and smile thinking what the fuss was all about.

Naps.rit

For more information regarding, Tigers Care: https://www.rit.edu/studentaffairs/tigerscare/

For more information regarding Naps.rit: https://naps.rit.edu/

Work of Glass: Be A Master of Flame and Time

 

Master of fine arts degree: https://www.rit.edu/programs/glass-mfa

Bachelor of fine arts degree: https://www.rit.edu/programs/glass-bfa

https://artdesign.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass

If you interested in to learn how to control fire and time to make work of art, you will enjoy the glass courses in RIT.

The MFA major in Glass is a two-year program of study, which strives to help you develop your personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. As a graduate student, you are provided full access to a complete glass facility and individual studio space to strengthen your technique and to practice designing pieces that flourish your personal expression of the medium. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses and in-depth critiques are provided, in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation, to provide you with a deep understanding of this personal craft. You will be exposed to a broad range of critical issues related to the conception and production of art, to inspire and provoke critical reflection and facilitate the development of your thesis exhibition and supporting documentation. As a graduate of this masters level major you can expect to move on to be a successful artist in this fine art field.

Before we design our glass work, we can sketch the idea and split the one sketch into detailed steps so that your partner will clearly understand what you want to make.

The professor shows students examples based on the teaching plan.

Then, the professor will give guidance according to the design scheme of different students.

In the process of teaching, our professor will always pay attention to the difficulties encountered by students in operation and help them in time.

Of course, If you are not in design major, you can choose this course as an elective course. Enjoy!