Kenneth Ruschak Headshot

Kenneth Ruschak

Research Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-5443
Office Location

Kenneth Ruschak

Research Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, Carnegie Mellon University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Bio

Dr. Kenneth J. Ruschak received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University and is Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. In addition to teaching and research, he is the Director of the Thin Film Mechanics Program

Professor Ruschak teaches a course in math techniques for chemical engineers. He joined the department in fall of 2007. Previously, he had a 33 year career at Eastman Kodak Company in coating technology and achieved the position of Senior Research Associate.

Research Areas

Dr. Ruschak continues to conduct broad research in coating technology. Topics include the modeling of coating dies and processes, surfactants as coating aids, and the rheology of polymer solutions and colloidal dispersions. His recent applications are commercial die design software and improvements in the coating and drying of fuel cell electrodes. He has 31 publications in engineering books and journals and 37 patents. He is a recipient of the John A. Tallmadge Award for Contributions to Coating Technology from AIChE, the C. E. K. Mees Award for Scientific Excellence from Kodak , the Distinguished Inventors’ Award with induction into the Kodak Distinguished Inventors’ Gallery, and the Eastman Innovation Award.

Recent Publications

  • Ruschak, K. J., and Weinstein, S. J. 2017 Model for the outer cavity of a dual-cavity die with parameters determined by two-dimensional finite-element analysis. AIChE J.. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1002/aic.15927.
  • S. Shetty, K. Ruschak and S. Weinstein, “Model for a two-cavity coating die with pressure and temperature deformation,” Polymer Engineering and Science, 52, 2012 (1173-1182).
  • S. J. Weinstein and K. J. Ruschak, “Coating flows,” Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, 36, 2004 (29-53).
585-475-5443

Currently Teaching

CHME-422
3 Credits
Complex fluids encountered in manufacturing, commercial products, and in nature, such as polymer solutions and melts, blood and other biological fluids, foams, slurries and emulsions, exhibit complex flow behaviors called non-Newtonian because they are not exhibited by low-molecular-weight fluids like air and water. Rheology is the study of deformation and flow. Rheological phenomena, their connection to fluid microstructure, and the characterization of complex fluids using commercial instruments and constitutive equations are introduced. This foundation is applied to elements of materials processing including flow and heat transfer in tubes and in boundary layers, mixing, and the drag of liquid on particles. Specialized manufacturing methods such as extrusion and the pumps and mixers required for these fluids are covered.
CHME-301
3 Credits
Mathematical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that augment training from core mathematics and engineering courses. The spreadsheet environment is used to implement mathematical procedures and examine data results. Topics examined include roots of equations, curve fitting, statistics, Fourier analysis, solution of systems of algebraic equations, optimization, numerical differentiation and integration, and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Techniques are applied to mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering.