Mark Kempski Headshot

Mark Kempski

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-2473
Office Location

Mark Kempski

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, Purdue University; MS, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

Bio

Dr. Mark Kempski holds a B.S. Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from Purdue University, M.S. and Ph.D.Mechanical Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He teaches primarily system dynamics, and system control at the upper-division undergraduate level. Over his career Dr. Kempski has taught a wide variety of undergraduate and graduate courses associated with data acquisition and analysis, engineering mechanics theory and experimental practice, and systems modeling.

Since joining the faculty of RIT in 1986, Dr. Kempski has developed several undergraduate and graduate courses. He is likewise responsible for the creation, development, and direction of the Systems Studio Laboratory in mechanical engineering. Established in 1989 through National Science Foundation grant USE-8852420, and supported since by RIT and corporate philanthropy, the Systems Lab is a hallmark facility providing an innovative lecture and hands-on learning environment within the department for nearly 25 years.

Dr. Kempski has participated in research activities focused in cardiovascular biomechanics. His Ph.D. dissertation modeled vascular blood flow in cardiac muscle. Subsequent research activities have investigated heart rate variability after acute head trauma in pediatric patients, blood velocity variability and cardiovascular system modeling during early fetal development, and the processing of biomedical ultrasound signals. Dr. Kempski has applied artificial neural network, time-frequency analysis, and assorted data analysis techniques to the classification of data signatures for use in biomedical-system and machine-system health monitoring. During his career Dr. Kempski has also explored interests in experimental soft-tissue biomechanics.

585-475-2473

Currently Teaching

MECE-211
2 Credits
This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include: • Physical dimension variability assessment • Centrifugal pump performance evaluation • Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements • LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application • Transient measurements including computer data acquisition • Digital signal input and output Each topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission
MECE-320
3 Credits
This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation.
MECE-643
3 Credits
This course introduces students to the study of linear control systems, their behavior and their design and use in augmenting engineering system performance. Topics include control system behavior characterization in time and frequency domains, stability, error and design. This is accomplished through classical feedback control methods that employ the use of Laplace transforms, block diagrams, root locus, and Bode diagrams. An integrated laboratory will provide students with significant hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience.
MECE-543
3 Credits
This course introduces students to the study of linear control system behavior for design and use in augmenting system performance. This is accomplished through classical control methods using Laplace transforms, block diagrams, root locus, and frequency domain analysis. Topics include: Laplace transform review, system modeling for control, fundamentals of time response behavior, stability analysis, steady-state error and design, feedback control properties, PID control, root locus analysis and design, and frequency response design. A laboratory will provide students with hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience.