Math Colloquium - Evolution of MATLAB

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evolution of matlab math colloquium

Calling all mathematicians and engineers!

 

Cleve Moler, the original author of MATLAB and cofounder of MathWorks, will be presenting live on Zoom next week. MATLAB has evolved over more than 40 years from a simple matrix calculator to the powerful technical computing environment we know today. Join the School of Mathematical Sciences for this special colloquium titled Evolution of MATLAB and hear straight from the creator about MATLAB’s transformation.

 

Zoom link available via Message Center email or from Dr. Nate Cahill, ndcsma@rit.edu.

 

Abstract:
We show how MATLAB has evolved over more than 40 years from a simple matrix calculator to a powerful technical computing environment. We demonstrate several examples of MATLAB applications. We conclude with a discussion of current developments, including machine learning, automated driving and parallel computation.

 

Speaker Bio:
Cleve Moler is the original author of MATLAB and one of the founders of the MathWorks. He is currently chairman and chief scientist of the company as well as a member of the National Academy of Engineering and past president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Moler was a professor of math and computer science for almost 20 years at the University of Michigan, Stanford University, and the University of New Mexico. He spent five years with two computer hardware manufacturers, the Intel Hypercube organization and Ardent Computer, before joining MathWorks full-time in 1989. In addition to being the author of the first version of MATLAB, Moler is one of the authors of the LINPACK and EISPACK scientific subroutine libraries. He is coauthor of three traditional textbooks on numerical methods and author of two online books, Numerical Computing with MATLAB and Experiments with MATLAB.


Contact
Nathan Cahill
Event Snapshot
When and Where
April 15, 2020
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Room/Location: Zoom
Who

Open to the Public

Interpreter Requested?

No