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NanoBio Devices

The NanoBio Device Lab works at the interface of nanomaterials, biology and imaging. We conduct research in following areas:

Nanomembranes and Nanomanufacturing

We are researching the fabrication of ultrathin nano- and micro-porous membranes. These membranes are typically 1/1000th the thickness of a human hair with well controlled pore sizes. Part of our work focuses on the science behind manufacturing scale-up of nanomaterials, which typically have very low yields at extraordinary cost. The National Science Foundation has funded our laboratory’s efforts to develop nano manufacturing scale-up techniques to help integrate nanomembranes into miniaturized hemodialysis cartridges.

Physiological Barrier Models and Cellular Microenvironments

We are using ultrathin membranes to enable development of tissue-on-a-chip barrier models and co-culture systems to better mimic the human body. The ultrathin nature of the membranes not only enables improved physiological processes, but also optical, electrical and biochemical analysis of barrier properties to understand drug transport and cell migration. Furthermore, we can control and manipulate physical and biochemical cell-cell interactions by tuning membrane pore sizes and membrane thickness at the nanometer and micrometer scales.

Biological Separations

An ultrathin membrane is an ideal sieve due to the lack of internal voids and high permeability. We are using ultrathin nanoporous membranes to explore simplified purification methods of biomolecules that otherwise require complex and often low-yield processes. In combination with our goals of scalable nano manufacturing, we are exploring the purification of cellular exosomes and microvesicles from biofluids. We have also begun research utilizing graphene oxide nano laminates to purify water-soluble and albumin-bound toxins from blood for kidney dialysis and liver support technologies in collaboration with Saeed Moghaddam at the University of Florida.

Funding and Support: The NanoBio Device Laboratory gratefully acknowledges funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIGMS and NIBIB) and the National Science Foundation.

NanoBio Device Laboratory
Department of Biomedical Engineering

Thomas Gaborski, Ph.D.
Phone: 585-475-4117
Fax: 585-475-4350
E-mail: trgbme@rit.edu

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