Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.
magnify
  • Advancing Tissue Engineering
    Research by RIT Professor Points to Improvements in Tissue Engineering
  • Plasmonic Electronics
    Exploring a Plasmonic Alternative
  • Cutting Edge Research
    MOVPE Equipment Changes Everything in Semiconductor Processing
  • Renewable Energy
    Impacts on Climate Change
  • Microscale Heat Transfer
    Satish Kandlikar: Reduced in Heat in Electronic Devices
  • Truly Unique
    RIT's Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory
  • Stellar Students
    Advancing Lithium Ion Battery Technology
  • Micro-Device Research
    Photonics Light The Way of Microprocessors
  • Truly Unique
    Micro-Device Research
  • Nanocomputing
    Brain Power
  • Micro-Device Research
    Implantable Micro-Device Research Could Lead To New Therapies To Treat Hearing Loss

Microsystems Engineering builds on the fundamentals of traditional engineering and science and tackles technical challenges of small-scale nano-systems. Microsystems Engineers manipulate electrical, photonic, optical, mechanical, chemical, and biological systems on a nano-scale.

Learn More »

 

Testimonials

  • Peng Xie - PhD Graduate
    I found my Microsystems experience prepared me well for the challenges of industry. During my Ph.D. program, I had taken a 1-year internship at IMEC as well as a 4 months internship at GlobalFoundries. These experiences helped me to better understand the workspace, expand my professional network and get a pulse of where the industry is heading. With my solid preparation at RIT, I am confident that I am ready to take on any challenges in the future.
  • Cory Cress - PhD Graduate
    During my time at RIT, I performed research in the NanoPower Research Labs. It was here that I learned how to create nanomaterials and devices. I learned how to understand them, and test their performance. Now, I use these skills at the US Naval Research Lab in Washington, DC. My work here has a massive impact on how electronics are created.
  • Anand Gopalan - PhD Graduate
    “While working toward my PhD in Microsystems at RIT, I was exposed to cutting edge technology with the opportunity to be part of industry supported research.”
  • Burak Baylav - PhD Graduate
    I had access to the latest technology, tools and data. It was a dream come true and I was able to use this relationship for my Ph.D. research.”
  • Monica Kempsell Sears - PhD Graduate
    I’ve always wanted to be one of the people who figures out how to push this field further and further—and now I am.

Research

  • The Microsale BioSeparations (MBS) Lab is a research group working on separation, sorting and detection techniques of nano and microbioparticles, such as macromolecules and cells. We employ electric field driven techniques (dielectroforesis, electrophoresis and electroosmosis) in microfluidic devices. This is a very multidisciplinary area that combines microfluidics, electric fields, chemistry and biology. Our main objective is to develop...

  • The Semiconductor Photonics and Electronics Group focuses on developing highly efficient III-V and III-Nitride semiconductors for photonic, optoelectronic, and electronic devices. High-efficiency III-V and III-Nitride semiconductor based photonic and optoelectronic devices such as lasers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are considered as promising candidates for next generation communication and illumination system.  The research group is...

  • Nanofabrication technology has been central to the field of semiconductor device manufacturing for many years.  As applications grow beyond microelectronics, new needs for research into nanoscale patterning and materials emerge.  The Nanolithography Research Laboratories at RIT has pioneered key advances in nanopatterning and materials technologies that have driven nanolithography into sub-30nm regimes.  Activities are underway in optical (UV...

  • The research activities in the Thin Film Electronics group are focused on inorganic thin-film electronics on both silicon and non-silicon platforms.  Research on low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) is exploring an alternative method of crystallization using a flash-lamp annealing (FLA) process.  The instrument uses Xenon flash-lamps with an extremely high irradiance to expose samples with pulses in the microsecond timescale, and...

  • The group’s research is centered around fluorescence spectroscopy of 21st century materials. These materials include conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes for use in polymer photovoltaics, as well as biological probes. Using fluorescence, we can characterize new materials, study energy transfer and measure excited state kinetics. Through collaborations with RIT's nanopower Research Laboratory we also have access to nanoimaging techniques...