Amy D' Amico Headshot

Amy D' Amico

Grants/Operations Manager
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts
Adjunct Faculty

585-475-6386
Office Location

Amy D' Amico

Grants/Operations Manager
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts
Adjunct Faculty

Education

BS in criminal justice, Rochester Institute of Technology; JD Albany Law School

Bio

As a first-generation attorney, Amy D’Amico currently applies her legal, criminal justice, and grant management expertise to the mission and core values of R.I.T.'s Center for Public Safety Initiatives (CPSI). With a background in nonprofit leadership, the practice of law, and grant identification and drafting, D’Amico is the Assistant Director of the Center for Public Safety Initiatives (CPSI). A CPSI core value is that “an individual’s compassion and empathy for others obligates one to a commitment to the cause of social justice.”  CPSI teaches students and academics to find ways to engage practitioners to do work that helps them and to seek out ways to improve organizations through research and analysis.  The foundation of the Center for Public Safety Initiatives is the practice of action research in which relevant data and analyses are brought to bear on the day to day decision-making processes or organizations and to serve the practice of policy development and implementation in real-time. D’Amico helps CPSI to carry out this mission and these values as the Assistant Director of the Center, managing staff, students, and the grant portfolio.

In addition to management of CPSI operations, D’Amico also teaches Ethics, Crime & Justice; and Courts; in the Department of Criminal Justice.  Amy D’Amico received her Juris Doctor from Albany Law School in 2012 and was admitted to practice law in NYS immediately thereafter. She received her Bachelors of Science in Criminal Justice from Rochester Institute of Technology in 2009, graduating with highest honors.

Currently Teaching

CRIM-299
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to ethical theories, consideration of justice as operationalized in contemporary criminal justice and emerging issues that accompany technological advancements such as video surveillance. Students will explore how ethical frameworks are embedded, implicitly and explicitly, in fundamental questions that are resolved by police, judges, and prosecutors. Conceptions of justice and criminal justice will be considered as they relate to criminological and criminal justice theories such as Procedural Justice/Legitimacy theories, Restorative Justice, as well as rationales for punishment. Implications for evaluation of technological changes in criminal justice will also be considered from the perspectives of ethical choices.