Christopher Hinesley Headshot

Christopher Hinesley

Assistant Director
Center for Campus Life
Student Affairs

Office Location
Office Mailing Address
SAU A-530

Christopher Hinesley

Assistant Director
Center for Campus Life
Student Affairs

Education

BS in exercise science, MS in wellness management, Ball State University; Ed.D. in executive leadership, St. John Fisher College

Bio

Teaching interests: I teach courses in gender and sexuality from a feminist, intersectional perspective, specifally center queer and trans spectrum lived experiences.

Courses taught: Gender and Health; Gender, Science, and Technology; Introduction to LGBT Studies; Queering Gender; Sociology of Gender

Research interests: Gender transition; the effects of privilege and oppression on education and wellness


Personal Links

Currently Teaching

WGST-361
3 Credits
This course begins with the concept that sexuality, gender and gender identity is neither fixed nor innate. Many people who adopt a definition or expression of gender different from society often identify themselves as queer. The study of this movement is referred to as queer theory. This course examines the concepts of sex, gender, and gender expression of straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people of all ages, races, and socioeconomic classes within the context of the larger society in which we live. Students will explore the unique political, legal, and interpersonal challenges faced by those embracing queer identity as well as the diversity of gender identities and expressions.
STSO-342
3 Credits
This course explores the importance of gender within Western science and technology. It considers how masculine and feminine identities are socially and culturally shaped, how sex and gender are being significantly transformed, and how rethinking gendered practices may help make science and technology fairer and more responsive. Cross-listed with women's and gender studies.
WGST-210
3 Credits
This introductory course examines a broad range of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues within the historical, psychological, racial, theological, cultural, and legal contexts in which we live. Students will learn the historical and theoretical foundations of GLBT studies as well as the contemporary implications for family, work, religion and law for GLBT people and the mainstream society. Students will have the opportunity to compare the regulation of sexual orientation across different gender, racial, and socioeconomic communities.
WGST-200
3 Credits
Women’s and Gender Studies is the academic manifestation of feminism. This interdisciplinary course interrogates the social constructions, political systems, and historical rhetorics that have produced and maintain hegemonic power structures. In this course you will examine key feminist, queer, and critical race writings and discourses, study the rise of feminist thought, and consider the history of women’s activism and the women’s rights movements from Suffrage to the present day. The course will also consider the application of feminist theory made visible through the rise of new and intersectional social identity movements.
WGST-342
3 Credits
This course explores the importance of gender within Western science and technology. It considers how masculine and feminine identities are socially and culturally shaped, how sex and gender are being significantly transformed, and how rethinking gendered practices may help make science and technology fairer and more responsive. Cross-listed with women's and gender studies.
PROF-798
3 Credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of faculty.
PROF-799
1 - 4 Credits
Special topics are experimental courses announced as offered. Variable credit.

Latest News

  • July 9, 2019

    Book cover titled: Gender Diversity: A Guide of Higher Education Faculty

    Gender diversity guide aimed at helping faculty learn more about gender

    Assistant Professor Alan Smerbeck is working with Q Center director Chris Hinesley on an updated edition of Gender Diversity: A Guide for Higher Education Faculty, which is set to come out in spring 2020. Originally published in 2016, the guide is meant to serve as a base-level reference book for learning about gender diversity, labels and pronouns, and the do’s and don’ts of talking about gender identities.