Dongryul Kim Headshot

Dongryul Kim

Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4498
Office Location

Dongryul Kim

Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, MA, Seoul University (South Korea); Ph.D., University of Virginia

585-475-4498

Currently Teaching

POLS-350
3 Credits
This course examines the East-Asian countries using the following comparative criteria as the organizing guidelines: modern political history of the country, political economy and development, governance and policy making, representation and participation, as well as major domestic and foreign policy issues. The political prospects of the countries for the 21st century will be analyzed and discussed.
POLS-220
3 Credits
Examines the interplay between states and markets, as well as the interaction of the global economy and international politics. The course will cover political economy, political ideology, global trade, international capital investment, debt, the integration of national financial markets, and the impact of globalization on society and the environment.
POLS-120
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of the field of international relations. Among the topics to be addressed are key theoretical concepts, themes and controversies in the field such as: important state and non-state actors in international politics, security, economic relations between states, levels of analysis, and schools of thought.
POLS-351
3 Credits
This course examines the politics of China through a comparative historical analysis of key political and economic developments. It discusses the Communist Revolution, governance and policy making under the communist regime, and the reforms following the introduction of capitalism. The goal of the course is to assess China’s comparative advantages and grand strategy in international politics.
POLS-210
3 Credits
The course provides a mode of analysis for the study of political systems. Basic concepts of political science are utilized to present a descriptive and analytical examination of various political systems that can be classified as liberal democracies, post-communist, newly industrializing countries, and Third World. Particular attention is paid to the governmental structure, current leadership and major issues of public policy of those selected political systems under review.
INGS-101
3 Credits
Within the past three decades, planetary computerization, burgeoning media industries, and other global processes have significantly altered the ways in which we experience our local and global worlds. Global reconfigurations of time and space change our consciousness, sense of self and others, and the material realities in which we live and work. This course provides the conceptual tools to assess emerging global processes, interactions and flows of people, ideas and things that challenge historical patterns of international studies and relations. The course will introduce you to international and global processes in areas such as global cultural economies, global cities, new forms of democracy and civil society, global religions, sexualities, health, and environments, increased competition for resources, political conflict, war and terrorism. Beyond understanding the causes and consequences of global change, this course will introduce you to ethical dilemmas in global justice movements, and in transferring ideas and technologies in new global contexts.
INGS-499
0 Credits
Paid work experience in a field related to international and global studies (at least 160 hours of work, completed over at least four weeks). Students will apply the accumulated knowledge, theory, and methods of the discipline to problem solving outside of the classroom.

In the News

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Kim, Ray Dongryul. "Social Origins of Nuclear Policy: A Niebuhrian." North Korea Review 8. 1 (2012): 117-134. Print.
Kim, Ray Dongryul. "The Legacy of Deferred Compensation in Korea's Administrative Reforms." The Korean Journal of Policy Studies 27. 2 (2012): 203-218. Print.