Franz Foltz Headshot

Franz Foltz

Associate Professor
Department of Science, Technology, and Society
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-5368
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
1309 Science Annex (building 13)

Franz Foltz

Associate Professor
Department of Science, Technology, and Society
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BS, MA, Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Bio

BS, Physics, Pennsylvania State University
MS, Governmental Science Policy, Pennsylvania State University
Ph.D., Science and Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Research Interests: cyberdemocracy, and digital government, science and technology policy, environmental policy, global change research policy, energy policy, science and technology studies, ideas of power, technology and religion, and democratic theory and increasing public participation (especially connected to science, technology, and power)

Courses: Science, Technology and Values; Science and Technology Policy; Energy and the Environment; Environmental Policy; Foundations of Public Policy, Seminar: Readings in Public Policy; Graduate Seminar in Science and Technology Policy, Energy Policy, Environment and Society; Seminar: Evaluation Research

585-475-5368

Currently Teaching

PUBL-701
3 Credits
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
PUBL-301
3 Credits
This course provides students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative methods, such as cost-benefit analysis, sampling designs, and decision trees. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
PUBL-101
3 Credits
This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to the key concepts of public policy, the policymaking process, the role of stakeholders and interest groups, and the basic dimensions policy analysis. Those concepts are then applied through a range of issues, such as the environment, clean energy, climate change, healthcare, cybersecurity, employment, privacy, telecommunications, and innovation, at local, state, federal and international levels.
STSO-201
3 Credits
Examines how local, state, federal and international policies are developed to influence innovation, the transfer of technology and industrial productivity in the United States and other selected nations.
STSO-140
3 Credits
This course explores the concepts and effects of science and technology on society, analyzes the relationship between science and technology, examines how each has come to play a major role today, and looks at how science and technology have affected and been affected by our values. This course also considers the environmental aspects of science and technology. Science and technology are often assumed to be value free, yet people, guided by individual and societal values, develop the science and technology. In turn, the choices people make among the opportunities provided by science and technology are guided by their individual values.
STSO-710
3 Credits
Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics.
PUBL-703
3 Credits
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered.