Janelle Duda-Banwar Headshot

Janelle Duda-Banwar

Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2816
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
Department of Criminal Justice College of Liberal Arts 93 Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester, NY 14623

Janelle Duda-Banwar

Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts

Bio

Dr. Janelle Duda-Banwar is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and a Senior Research Associate at the Center for Public Safety Initiatives (CPSI) at Rochester Institute of Technology. Duda-Banwar received her PhD  in Social Welfare from Case Western Reserve University’s Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. She received her MSW from California State University, Long Beach and her BSW from Xavier University in Cincinnati. 

Through CPSI she works with student research assistants to conduct action research in the local community. She works closely with local agencies to implement and evaluate interventions. Her research interests include court practices and justice, gun violence reduction, community responses to social problems, and moral and ethical development. She has worked closely with local agencies to develop, implement, and evaluate community-level interventions. In this capacity, she has worked on projects to reduce gun violence, reduce recidivism, and to respond to emerging needs within the criminal justice system. 

Current projects include: Project CLEAN to disrupt the open-air heroin market in northeast Rochester, implementation of Medication Assisted Treatment for opioid use disorder in the local jail, Community Engagement to Reduce Victimization (CERV) is a hospital-based violence intervention program to reduce interpersonal gun violence, and assessing the social and economic impact of court processing for low-level offenses. 

585-475-2816

Currently Teaching

CRIM-100
3 Credits
This seminar acquaints students with key resources for understanding and conducting criminal justice research. The course involves extensive reading, writing, and discussion. It covers the principles of the criminal justice system including the relationship between system components, their effectiveness, and theories of operation and reform. Consideration is also given to specific problems within the branches of the criminal justice system.
CRIM-110
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to criminal justice. One of the primary goals of this course is to provide a general understanding of how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The main component parts of the criminal justice system (i.e., police, courts, and corrections) will be examined with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the behavior and interactions among the main actors in the criminal justice system. To accomplish this goal, we will examine how criminal cases are processed in the criminal justice system. We will also consider how external forces, such as political decisions, public opinion, and the media influence criminal justice decision-making. Students will also formulate, argue, and evaluate ethical perspectives regarding criminal justice systems, individual-level decisions, and recognize relationships with other ethical problems in society. Finally, throughout the course we will emphasize how the societal response to crime has evolved over time.
CRIM-599
1 - 6 Credits
A program of study executed by an individual student with assistance and guidance by an instructor, outside a regular classroom setting. Guidelines for designing and gaining approval for an independent study are provided in College of Liberal Arts Policy I.D.