Mary Kitzel Headshot

Mary Kitzel

Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-5059
Office Location

Mary Kitzel

Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of History
College of Liberal Arts

Bio

Office Hours: Fall or by appointment

Bio:
Dr Kitzel's research interests lie at the intersection of Historical Human Geography and Deaf Cultural Studies. She writes about how Deaf communities formulate in different locations. Her most recent project focuses on Rochester’s Deaf Community in the nineteenth century. She also studies Early Modern and early Victorian deaf communities in Southern England.

Dr Kitzel is the Founder and Director of the Field School in Deaf Geographies. As a part of the School's mission, Dr Kitzel also coordinates the International Conference in Deaf Geographies (ICDG). This conference serves as an incubator for research in the new and exciting field, as well as providing an opportunity for the School's scholars to share the findings of their projects. In 2016, ICDG was the only conference with a Deaf Studies theme hosted in the United States.

Dr Kitzel received her AAS in Educational Interpreting from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf and her BS in Multidisciplinary Studies from the College of Continuing Education, both at Rochester institute of Technology. Her MSc in Cross Cultural Research Methods (Geography) and her Ph.D. in Human Geography were both completed at the School of Global Studies, the University of Sussex under the supervision of Simon Rycroft and Brian Short. Dr Kitzel's first teaching post was at the Bader International Study Centre of Queen’s University (Canada), Herstmonceux, East Sussex, where she was also Scholar-in-Residence in 2012.

A Rochester native, Dr Kitzel has been a member of the RIT community for more than thirty years - as student, alumnae, staff, and faculty.

585-475-5059

Currently Teaching

HIST-231
3 Credits
This course explores the history of the deaf community in global perspective from the 18th to the 20th century. It takes a comparative approach, exploring the histories of deaf people from around the globe, including deaf lives in Central America, Europe, Africa, and East Asia. Special attention will be given to the major events in European deaf history, as Europe was the site for the first schools for the deaf in the history of the world, and the world's first documented deaf culture, in France, emerged there as well. The spread of deaf education, the rise of indigenous signed languages, the birth of deaf-hood, and the fight for human rights will all be placed in a global context.
HIST-430
3 Credits
History, and particularly Deaf history within a predominantly hearing world, is the product of a vast network of inter-related spaces, in which more or less well-defined knowledges and cultures are performed. This course will provide students the opportunity to learn skills to identify and describe the different spaces - produced by both Deaf and hearing people - that have contributed to a 'history of the Deaf community'. It will equip students with the ability to not only identify and describe the histories of the Deaf community, but also to critically explore the meta-historical narratives that shape those histories, allowing them to situate those narratives within the wider evolution of social and cultural representation. Deaf Geographies reside at the intersection of Human Geography and Deaf Studies. It considers spatiality, language, citizenship, education, and identity, as well as other themes of interest in new ways by viewing these through the eyes of a community who perform their cultural and social geographies in the visual.