Oral Robertson Headshot

Oral Robertson

Assistant Professor
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2083
Office Location

Oral Robertson

Assistant Professor
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, State University College at Geneseo; MA, State University College at Brockport; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

Bio

Professor Robertson received his B.A. in Sociology from SUNY Geneseo, his M.A. in American History from SUNY Brockport and his Ph.D. in Sociology from SUNY Buffalo. Professor Robertson's research and teaching interests are in crime, law, deviance; race, ethnicity, immigration; urban sociology; and the African Diaspora.

585-475-2083

Currently Teaching

CRIM-285
3 Credits
This course will investigate the roles played by racial minorities- African-Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans-- at each level of the criminal justice system in the United States of America and globally. The experience of African Americans will be emphasized since this group has been the subject of more extensive research by criminologists and criminal justice practitioners.
CRIM-110
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to criminal justice. One of the primary goals of this course is to provide a general understanding of how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The main component parts of the criminal justice system (i.e., police, courts, and corrections) will be examined with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the behavior and interactions among the main actors in the criminal justice system. To accomplish this goal, we will examine how criminal cases are processed in the criminal justice system. We will also consider how external forces, such as political decisions, public opinion, and the media influence criminal justice decision-making. Students will also formulate, argue, and evaluate ethical perspectives regarding criminal justice systems, individual-level decisions, and recognize relationships with other ethical problems in society. Finally, throughout the course we will emphasize how the societal response to crime has evolved over time.
CRIM-350
3 Credits
A comprehensive survey of historical and contemporary theories of the causes of crime. Included are theories that derive from biological, psychological, sociological, geographic, economic, and political perspectives. Development of criminological theory reviewed; fundamental distinctions between classical and positivist theories and between theories of crime and criminality discussed.

Latest News

Select Scholarship

Invited Keynote/Presentation
Robertson, O. Nick. "The Impact of Incarceration on Communities." Presentation for Professional Development to Teachers, Social Workers, and Administrators, for the Rochester City School District. Rochester City School District. Rochester, NY. 25 Feb. 2014. Conference Presentation. *
Robertson, O. Nick. "Power to the Peoples of Color: Challenges and Triumphs of the Professional World." II First World Diasporas of Color Undergraduate Conference: Globalizing Identities and Migration across Diasporas. SUNY Geneseo. Geneseo, NY. 1 Apr. 2014. Conference Presentation. *