Rachel Mc Ginnis Headshot

Rachel Mc Ginnis

Visiting Assistant Professor
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4768
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
18 Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester, NY 14623

Rachel Mc Ginnis

Visiting Assistant Professor
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BS, MS, Rochester Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University

Bio

I am an interdisciplinary scholar. I completed my Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from Nova Southeastern University (NSU), a Bachelors and a Masters of Science from the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). My dissertation research was in the field of genocide and ethnic cleansing. I wrote my dissertation on the use of sexual violence as a tactic specifically targeting male civilians and paramilitary during conflict.

Over the last few years, I spent time volunteering and conducting field work in Northern Ireland, Lebanon, Jordan, Greece, France, and the Syrian-Turk Border. I work with individuals who have experienced sexual violence during conflict and/or forced migration. In addition, I work with local NGO’s, medical personnel, and government officials to provide awareness on these topics specifically for the male refugee population in the region.

I am the Executive Vice-Secretary of the International Network of Genocide Scholars (INoGS), actively involved with the Karam Foundation, and serve as a council member on the human trafficking task force in Athens, Greece. Fall 2018 I will showcase my first photo installation focusing on the forcibly displaced at the Rochester Fringe Festival.

585-475-4768

Currently Teaching

SOCI-315
3 Credits
Daily we watch, seemingly helplessly, as people are displaced from their communities, homelands, and countries and subsequently seek asylum around the world, sometimes within our own local communities. Causes of displacement include war, violence, persecution, and modes of terror that increasingly affect the lives of women and children. In addition to the loss of human life and potential, the ensuing consequences of violent displacement include poverty, disease, physical and psychological trauma, hopelessness, and vulnerability to human rights abuses. In this course, we explore how the rights and dignity of refugees can be protected. We also examine resettlement processes and, for those who are eventually repatriated, we address how they can successfully reintegrate into reconstructing societies that remain barely functional. Most importantly, we consider how the trauma of displacement can be minimized.
ANTH-330
3 Credits
This course critically examines the visual culture of war and terror in a global world from an anthropological perspective. Representations of violence are endlessly transmitted on television, on the internet, in print media, in cinema, and in recreational games to become part of our everyday visual culture. Whether disseminated as news, documentary truth, or entertainment, the ubiquitous encounters with images of violence require a new form of visual literacy that not only highlights the intersection of the local and the global, but also recognizes the ways in which visual technologies, cultural politics of memory and history, media practices, and national ideologies intervene in the formation of a visual culture of war and terror.
SOCI-322
3 Credits
The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health as “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” The definition has evolved to recognize the importance of social factors in determining both individual and population health. This course uses the WHO’s 2008 Report “Closing the Gap in a Generation,” as an overarching theoretical framework in analyzing upstream and downstream factors that contribute to health outcomes. Using a sociological lens, this course explores diverse factors that have positive and negative impacts on individual and population health. These include macro-factors (climate change, environmental pollution, global and/or national economies) and micro-factors (the built environment- neighborhood conditions, green spaces, poor or low quality housing, and rest and leisure spaces). The course also integrates individual behavioral choices, educational attainment and the larger role of societal discrimination against subgroups within societies, the role of institutions and their impacts on population health. The course emphasizes that health is impacted by the social circumstances into which people are born, in which they grow up, live, work, and age; the distribution of power or unjust power relations; and the level of social exclusion or inclusion.
ANTH-501
3 Credits
Students will design and conduct a library-based research project with supervision of a faculty member, bringing to bear the knowledge and theoretical perspectives accumulated during the prior years of study.