Robert Bowen Headshot

Robert Bowen

Lecturer
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2841
Office Location

Robert Bowen

Lecturer
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, MA, State University College at Brockport; M.Ed, Ph.D., University of Rochester

Bio

B.A. SUNY College at Brockport 1967
M.A. SUNY College at Brockport 1974
M.S.Ed. University of Rochester 1979
Ph.D. University of Rochester 1987

Dr. Bowen has been teaching various psychology courses since 1974 and has been teaching for RIT since 1986. He has publications in the area of adolescent social-cognitive development and developmental psychopathology.

585-475-2841

Currently Teaching

PSYC-101
3 Credits
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology.
PSYC-235
3 Credits
This course covers topics in learning such as non-associative learning, classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, stimulus control of behavior, reinforcement, generalization and discrimination, and observational learning. Topics on learning and behavior in non-human animals may also be covered.
PSYC-221
3 Credits
This course will serve as an introduction to the study of psychopathology and mental illness. The course examines the major categories of mental disorder not only from the descriptive point of view, but also in terms of the major theoretical explanations of the causes of disorder. The major treatment modalities also are covered.
PSYC-225
3 Credits
This course explores topics related to behaviors and mental processes of individuals in social situations. Topics include: methodology, social perception, social cognition, the self, attitudes, prejudice, attraction, social influence, pro-social behavior, aggression, and behavior in groups. Course activities include lecture, class demonstrations, and assignments.