Samuel McQuade Headshot

Samuel McQuade

Professor
Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4145
Office Location

Samuel McQuade

Professor
Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

Bio

With 35 years of professional law enforcement, security, research and higher education experience, Sam McQuade currently serves as a tenured full Professor and Enterprise Security Program Coordinator at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).

Dr. Sam McQuade is a former National Institute of Justice Program Manager for the U.S Department of Justice, and Study Director for the Committee on Law and Justice at the National Research Council of the National Academies of Sciences. He also served as an Air National Guard security officer, county deputy sheriff, detective, school resource officer, city police officer and police organizational change consultant.

Professor McQuade holds a Doctoral Degree in Public Policy from George Mason University, a Master of Arts Degree in Public Administration from the University of Washington, and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Human Services Management from Western Washington University. He teaches and conducts research inclusive of cybercrime, security studies, terrorism, stresses experienced by family members of incarcerated offenders, and the role of evil in organizational and public policy decision-making.

Recent books: Understanding and Managing Cybercrime, The Encyclopedia of Cybercrime and Cyber Bullying: Protecting Kids and Adults from Online Bullies, and Handbook on Cyber Bullying. Youth education books include: Living with the Internet, Cyber Stalking and Cyber Bullying, and Internet Addiction and Online Gaming.

585-475-4145

Areas of Expertise
Cybersecurity
Cyber-bullying
Computer security
Internet issues
Criminal justice issues

Currently Teaching

CRIM-210
3 Credits
Develops understanding of theories, management processes, organizational capabilities and social implications of criminal justice technologies. Many categories of technology are considered, ranging from communications and records management, to special assault and protection tactics. Students consider the role of industry, government, and user groups in the historical development and legal/ethical use of specific technologies.
CRIM-489
3 Credits
Focuses on contemporary issues and topics not otherwise distinctly incorporated in established criminal justice courses. Concentrates on student discussion and interaction surrounding required readings on topics such as crime prevention and issues in the prosecution/court system. Recent examples include cyberlaw, prisoner re-entry restorative justice, wrongful convictions, crime mapping, crime analysis, non-traditional courts, legal controversies in the law, substance abuse, and legal research.
CRIM-110
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to criminal justice. One of the primary goals of this course is to provide a general understanding of how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The main component parts of the criminal justice system (i.e., police, courts, and corrections) will be examined with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the behavior and interactions among the main actors in the criminal justice system. To accomplish this goal, we will examine how criminal cases are processed in the criminal justice system. We will also consider how external forces, such as political decisions, public opinion, and the media influence criminal justice decision-making. Students will also formulate, argue, and evaluate ethical perspectives regarding criminal justice systems, individual-level decisions, and recognize relationships with other ethical problems in society. Finally, throughout the course we will emphasize how the societal response to crime has evolved over time.
CRIM-299
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to ethical theories, consideration of justice as operationalized in contemporary criminal justice and emerging issues that accompany technological advancements such as video surveillance. Students will explore how ethical frameworks are embedded, implicitly and explicitly, in fundamental questions that are resolved by police, judges, and prosecutors. Conceptions of justice and criminal justice will be considered as they relate to criminological and criminal justice theories such as Procedural Justice/Legitimacy theories, Restorative Justice, as well as rationales for punishment. Implications for evaluation of technological changes in criminal justice will also be considered from the perspectives of ethical choices.