Tina Lent Headshot

Tina Lent

Professor
Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2460
Office Location

Tina Lent

Professor
Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, MA, University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Rochester

Bio

Tina Olsin Lent is the director of the Museum Studies program and a professor of visual culture in the Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture in the College of Liberal Arts. Her teaching and research focus on visual culture, particularly film and its intersections with museum studies and gender studies. Her articles have appeared in the Literature/Film Quarterly, the Journal of Popular Film and Television, and the Southern California Quarterly, and in such collections as Jenkins and Karnick’s Classical Hollywood Comedy. She curated the exhibition Mobilizing America: Fighting World War I on the Homefront and the Battlefront that debuted in RIT’s University Gallery from January-March 2014, then traveled to the Universidad del Pacifico in Lima, Peru, from August-September, 2014. She chaired the Fine Arts Department for 26 years and the Women’s and Gender Studies program for 20 years. She is on the Board of Directors of several professional organizations.

Currently Teaching

MUSE-220
3 Credits
This course examines the history, theory, ideology, and practice of collecting within the institutional context of the museum. It considers the formation of the modern museum, and focusing on the American context, investigates the function and varieties of museums, ranging from natural history, anthropology, science and technology, history, and art. The course explores the history of the museum and its evolution institutionally, ideologically, and experientially. The course also considers the operations of museums from accessioning through deaccessioning, examining museum management, collections management and collections care. The course also explores museum governance and the professional ethics and legal constraints that affect museum professionals. The course examines how a museum carries out its mission of public education through its collections and exhibitions, as well as through its educational programs and community outreach and visitor studies. Current issues in the museum world are also considered, including: the museum's educational function versus its entertainment function; the problems of staying solvent in an era of diminishing governmental and corporate subsidies; deaccessioning collections to support the museum operations; issues of art theft and repatriation (ranging from colonial era and Nazi era plunder, the disposition of human remains and sacred objects, and illicit trafficking); the evolving responsibilities of the museum to its public and the cultural heritage; and the rise of the virtual museum. Throughout the semester, the course examines museums and their practices through the perspectives of colonialism, nationalism, class, race, age, gender, and ethnicity. The course includes field trips to local museums and collections throughout the semester.
FNRT-220
3 Credits
This course examines the history, theory, ideology, and practice of collecting within the institutional context of the museum. It considers the formation of the modern museum, and focusing on the American context, investigates the function and varieties of museums, ranging from natural history, anthropology, science and technology, history, and art. The course explores the history of the museum and its evolution institutionally, ideologically, and experientially. The course also considers the operations of museums from accessioning through deaccessioning, examining museum management, collections management and collections care. The course also explores museum governance and the professional ethics and legal constraints that affect museum professionals. The course examines how a museum carries out its mission of public education through its collections and exhibitions, as well as through its educational programs and community outreach and visitor studies. Current issues in the museum world are also considered, including: the museum's educational function versus its entertainment function; the problems of staying solvent in an era of diminishing governmental and corporate subsidies; de-accessioning collections to support the museum operations; issues of art theft and repatriation (ranging from colonial era and Nazi era plunder, the disposition of human remains and sacred objects, and illicit trafficking); the evolving responsibilities of the museum to its public and the cultural heritage; and the rise of the virtual museum. Throughout the quarter, the course examines museums and their practices through the perspectives of colonialism, nationalism, class, race, age, gender, and ethnicity. The course includes field trips to local museums and collections throughout the semester.
MUSE-490
3 Credits
The Senior Thesis in Museum Studies is the final requirement in the degree program. Students will conduct the appropriate research to address the topic they had proposed in Research Methods. They will present their results as a formal written thesis and in an appropriate public forum. The course provides students the opportunity to develop their research and practical skills and to share the results with the department and the college.
MUSE-497
0 Credits
Internship in a field related to Museum Studies (at least 50 hours). Students will apply the accumulated knowledge, theory, and methods of the discipline to problem solving outside of the classroom.
MUSE-498
0 Credits
Co-op in a field related to museum studies (at least 80 hours). Students will apply the accumulated knowledge, theory, and methods of the discipline to problem solving outside of the classroom.
MUSE-499
0 Credits
Co-op in a field related to museum studies (at least 200 hours). Students will apply the accumulated knowledge, theory, and methods of the discipline to problem solving outside of the classroom.