Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

International experts answer your questions about the choices, controversies, and decisions faced by the parents and educators of deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Question from M.R., Australia

We are a small state with a generic inclusion policy for all students with a disability, which means that deaf students must attend their local school and are supported by itinerant ToD and/or interpreters. Our numbers are small and decentralised so most deaf children attend schools where they are the only deaf child. I would like to influence the Education Department policy to allow deaf children the choice of enrolling ‘out of area’ to be educated in a setting with other deaf and hard-of-hearing students, but I need some research evidence to present to the Department before they will consider this. Can anyone please help with some research supporting the need for deaf children to have access to deaf peers and role models for their linguistic, social and emotional development?

Question from M.R., Australia. Posted August 3, 2017.
Response from Marc Marschark - NTID

As much so we talk about the importance of “supporting the need for deaf children to have access to deaf peers and role models for their linguistic, social and emotional development,” the evidence is remarkably thin. What current evidence (as opposed to testimonials) there is comes primarily from co-enrollment programs, programs that include a critical mass of deaf students in inclusive classrooms that include both a general education teacher and a teacher of the deaf. You can find a description of co-enrollment and access couple of relevant articles through the Raising and Educating Deaf Children website. Two book chapters listed below specifically emphasize the benefits of being with a critical mass of deaf peers for linguistic and social-emotional development, respectively. At this point, however, we do not yet have much evidence to indicate strong effects of co-enrollment on academic achievement. More research is definitely needed.

Further reading:

Tang, G., Lam, S. & Yiu, K.-M. (2014). Language development of severe to profoundly deaf children studying in a sign bilingual and co-enrollment environment. In M. Marschark, G. Tang, & H. Knoors (Eds.), Bilingualism and bilingual deaf education (pp. 313–341). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Yiu, K.-M. & Tang, G. (2014). Social integration of deaf and hard-of-hearing children in a sign bilingual and co-enrollment environment. In M. Marschark, G. Tang, & H. Knoors (Eds.), Bilingualism and bilingual deaf education (pp. 342–367). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.