Category Archives: Campus Events

RIT/NTID Dyer Arts Center hosts ‘Three Masters: Hidden Gems’ exhibit through April 20

painting of a woman reclining on a couch colors are mostly reds/yellows/oranges with some green and light blue.

Three artists whose works have been shaped by family, faith and overcoming hardships are the focus of the “Three Masters: Hidden Gems” exhibit at the Joseph F. and Helen C. Dyer Arts Center at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The show runs through April 20.

“Three Masters” showcases the lively, harmonious portraits by Claire Bergman; the rich, stylized oil paintings by Igor Kolombatovic; and the mixed-media collages of mundane objects by Henry Newman.

Claire Bergman describes herself as a portraitist, emphasizing the importance of the figure as a whole with an inner life of its own. She says the artistic process allows her to study characters, and she attributes her success to self-growth and self-confidence as her art style evolves and develops. She is best known for her work with oil, watercolor and pen and ink. She has said that her deafness influences her work, and she imagines that the subjects of her portraits are trying to lip-read or follow a conversation.

Igor Kolombatovic’s artwork explores themes of freedom emerging from oppression. After experiencing hardship and upheaval during World War II, Kolombatovic found freedom and refuge from Europe when he settled in Canada. He eventually moved to California, where he attended the San Francisco Art Institute. He worked for Charter USA as an architectural engineering draftsman and was a docent at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Oakland Museum of California. He is best known for his artwork that he says reminds him and others about how God’s blessings outweigh his struggles, as he sought to examine his deaf identity and the history involved.

Henry Newman’s art is characterized by a unique style that blends common household objects with the art of collage, seeing the potential in what others saw as trash or junk. Materials he used to create his mixed media collages included scraps from hardware and appliances, hinges, plywood, backboards from TV sets, old clothing, jar lids, rusted metal and cassette tapes. He saw his deafness as an artistic advantage because it gave him a good eye for visual perception. He also used a wide range of styles, including linecuts, assemblages and paintings, and celebrated Jewish history and identity through art, using Hebrew and Yiddish texts as influences. 

A closing reception, free and open to the public, will be held at the gallery 5-7 p.m. Friday, April 12.

The gallery is located on the RIT campus in Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall, 52 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Saturday. For more information, go to www.rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts/.

For more information, contact Vienna McGrain at 585-475-4952 or Vienna.Carvalho@rit.edu.

Rochester Red Wings baseball partners with RIT/NTID, Rochester School for the Deaf for Deaf Culture Day at Frontier Field April 28

three men, one woman, two mascots and a mannequin with baseball jersey and hat.

Rochester Red Wings baseball, in partnership with Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf and Rochester School for the Deaf, will host the first Deaf Culture Day at Frontier Field, Sunday, April 28. The 1:05 p.m. game is a matchup between the Red Wings and the Pawtucket Red Sox.

The announcement on March 5 at RIT/NTID featured Red Wings officials, administrators from RIT/NTID and RSD, student athletes, and mascots Spikes, from the Red Wings, and Ritchie, from RIT.

During the announcement, the Red Wings unveiled a specially designed jersey and baseball cap with “Red Wings” embroidered in American Sign Language. Replica T-shirts and adjustable caps, along with a ticket to the game, are available to fans for $20 and $22, respectively. Other merchandise, including flex-fit caps, adjustable caps, fitted caps and T-shirts, are available online or at the team store at One Morrie Silver Way in Rochester. Single tickets to the game--$7/$9/$11 using the promo code GOWINGS – are for sale at https://www.ticketreturn.com/prod2/BuyNew.asp?EventID=262647&PromoCode=gowings. Proceeds from sales of game-worn jerseys will benefit NTID and RSD.

Interpreters will be on site during the game at Frontier Field to assist fans, and there will be a “silent inning,” without public address announcements, to raise further awareness about deafness.

“We are proud to partner with RIT/NTID and Rochester School for the Deaf for Deaf Culture Day so that we can celebrate the deaf community and the important impact that deaf citizens have had in Rochester,” said Red Wings General Manager Dan Mason. “We look forward to hosting many deaf members of the Rochester community and their families, while also educating all fans about deaf culture. The Red Wings are excited to have our players wear American Sign Language-inspired caps and jerseys for this special game. We also look forward to welcoming back deaf citizen and former NTID staff member Ogden Whitehead to Frontier Field, who was a fixture for many years while playing the role of ‘Recycleman,’ the Red Wings biggest cheerleader.”

NTID President Gerry Buckley spoke about the connection between deafness and baseball, as well as the rich history of Rochester’s deaf community.

“Throughout history, baseball and the deaf community have been intertwined,” he said. “And Rochester, which is known as ‘Sign City,’ is home to a historic deaf community. Furthermore, deaf and hard-of-hearing fans have been among the most loyal Red Wings followers. RIT/NTID is proud of its own history of deaf baseball players and is proud to partner with the Rochester Red Wings.”

Antony McLetchie, superintendent and CEO of Rochester School for the Deaf, said “RSD has a long history with baseball. This is a very exciting time for us and we look forward to this event being part of our history with the Rochester Red Wings.”

Amelia Hamilton, a third-year photographic and imaging arts major from Austin, Texas, worked with the Red Wings organization this past summer. “I enjoyed photographing the games and the fans. Rochester is a great community and being with the team helped me to get to know it better. I’m excited to see where my career will take me, but I will never forget the great experiences with the Red Wings.”

For more information, contact Vienna McGrain at 585-475-4952 or Vienna.Carvalho@rit.edu; or Nate Rowan, director of communications, Rochester Red Wings, at 585-454-1001, ext. 3006, or NRowan@redwingsbaseball.com.

NTID Performing Arts and RIT College of Liberal Arts announce 2019-2020 joint theatrical season

Poster with five program names and descriptions with graphics for each.

NTID Performing Arts and RIT College of Liberal Arts have announced their 2019-2020 joint theatrical season. The plays and dance performance present a wide array of cultural, political, and social issues. Two productions will be presented on the Panara stage, two productions will be performed in 1510 Theatre Lab, and one production will be performed in the Booth Black Box. The season includes:

I and You
Play by Lauren Gunderson
Directed by Andy Head
October 25-27, 2019
1510 Lab Theatre, LBJ Building

One afternoon, Anthony arrives unexpectedly at classmate Caroline’s door bearing a beat-up copy of Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” an urgent assignment from their English teacher. Homebound due to illness, Caroline hasn’t been to school in months, but she is as quick and sardonic as Anthony is athletic, sensitive, and popular. As these two let down their guards and share their secrets, this seemingly mundane poetry project unlocks a much deeper mystery that has brough them together. I and You is an ode to youth, life, love, and the strange beauty of human connectedness.

People of the Third Eye
Directed by Patti Durr and Karen Christie
November 15-17, 2019
Robert F. Panara Theatre

The show will be a unique work showcasing slices of Deaf lives—both contemporary and historical. Created collaboratively by the cast members, audiences will be treated to various genres of ASL performance art—poetry, narrative personal experiences, creative storytelling, reenactment of historical events, as well as dramatic monologues and dialogues. Woven into the action on stage will be film clips and live painting. Bookending the play will be a contemporary encounter with a well-known historical Deaf figure who still has much to teach us.

Dial M for Murder
Written by Frederick Knott
Directed by Luane Davis-Haggerty
February 28-March 1, 2019
Robert F. Panara Theatre

Tony Wendice has married his wife, Margot, for her money and now plans to murder her for the same reason. He arranges the perfect murder. Tony blackmails a scoundrel he used to know into strangling Margot for a fee of one thousand pounds. He also arranges a brilliant alibi for himself. Unfortunately…the murderer gets murdered and the victim survives. But this doesn’t baffle the husband: He sees his hireling’s death as an opportunity to have his wife convicted for the murder of the man who tried to murder her, and that is what almost happens. Luckily, the police inspector from Scotland Yard and a young man who is in love with the wife discover the truth, and in a scene of almost unbearable suspense they trap the husband into revealing his guilt, thus freeing Margot.

Bent
Written by Martin Sherman
Directed by Matthew Nicosia
March 27-29, 2020
BOO-A428, Booth Black Box, Booth Building

In 1934 Berlin on the eve of the Nazi incursion, Max, a grifter, and his lover Rudy are recovering from a night of debauchery with an SA trooper. Two soldiers burst into the apartment and slit their guest’s throat, beginning a nightmare odyssey through Nazi Germany. Ranked lower on the human scale than Jews, the men as avowed homosexuals, flee. Desperate and on the run, Max asks his own “discreetly” homosexual Uncle Freddie for help, the older man offers little more than suggestions on how to live, as he does, practicing homosexuality on the side. Attempting their escape, Rudy is beaten to death as Horst, another homosexual prisoner, warns Max to deny his lover. Taken to a death camp at Dachau, Max and Horst branded with the “pink triangle,” hope to survive with each other for comfort and courage, but it is not to be. Richard Gere created the role of Max on Broadway.

The Rhythm of Motion and Light (dance)
Conceived and Directed by Thomas Warfield
April 17-19, 2020
Robert F. Panara Theatre

Dance: The Rhythm of Motion and Light is a multi-arts, multi-experiential dance performance utilizing innovative collaborations with new technologies and live music for a concert in spring 2020. The performance will include: the use of AR (Augmented Reality – blending physical world with virtual content over-layed), dancers with hidden mini-cameras on their bodies adding to the layers of compositional substance, manipulation of visual texture - using ‘cellograph’ (where cellophane is stretched across structured frames and painted on). Another innovative concept will be choreography created from multiple forms of technology itself – instead of adding technology to what is already choreographed, the dance will be molded from the technology – the way a choreographer might choreograph to music. This production will be a true spectacle of color, light, movement and music, designed to expand the confines of dance and present a more fluid and integrated expression of technology.

For more information on the entire season, please visit: https://www.rit.edu/cla/finearts/theatrearts/cla-ntid-19-20-theatrical-season.

TICKET INFORMATION
On-site: RIT University Arenas, 200 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester NY 14623
Website: www.rittickets.com
By phone: 585-475-4121
Prices:
$5.00 for Student, Senior (60+), and Children under age 12
$10.00 for RIT Faculty/Staff/Alumni
$12.00 for General Public
Tickets also will be available on performance days two hours prior to curtain.

**For Bent: this play is not appropriate for children under 12. **

ROBERT F. PANARA LOCATION
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Lyndon Baine Johnson (LBJ) Hall (Building 60)
52 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, New York 14623

Free parking is available in Lot L.

BOOTH BLACK BOX LOCATION
Rochester Institute of Technology
James E. Booth (BOO) Hall (Building 7A)
Rochester, New York 14623

Free parking is available in Lot E, F, G, and H.

ABOUT ROBERT F. PANARA THEATRE
The Robert F. Panara Theatre is named in honor of Dr. Robert Panara, RIT’s first Deaf professor and founder of the NTID Drama Club. A 460-seat auditorium, the theater has played host to numerous guest artists such as Mikail Baryishnikov; Jane Fonda; Louise Fletcher; Marlee Maitlin; the National Theatre of the Deaf; Phyllis Frelich; Bernard Bragg; Patrick Graybill; Howie Seago; Cleveland SignStage; Annabelle Gamzon; Garth Fagan Dance; Hartford Ballet; Foreigner; Emerson, Lake and Palmer; Sean Forbes; American Deaf Dance Company; Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre; Danielle Ponder; and many others. The theater opened its doors on October 3, 1974, with a production of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew. Originally called the Experimental Educational Theatre (EET), the theater program has a rich heritage of offering challenging, entertaining, and provocative works, all created for both Deaf and hearing audiences. We have produced work in a wide variety of theater styles; Comedy, Musical, Dance, Drama, Classical, Kabuki (Japanese), Experimental, Puppets, and new works by both Deaf and hearing authors.

BOOTH BLACK BOX
The Booth Black Box is a smaller space located on the lower level of James E. Booth (BOO) Hall in room A428. The space serves as a venue for a variety of experimental and intimate productions.

Current season productions at RIT include:

Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 6:30pm
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 6:30pm
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 6:30pm
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 7:30pm

‘Leaves of the Poetry Tree,’ based on children’s poetry and prose, brings interpretive dance to life for deaf and hearing audiences

light green background with center image of trees with dancing figure. text above reads Leaves of the Poetry Tree

A collection of interpretive dances based on children’s prose and poetry is featured in a new production by the National Technical Institute for the Deaf’s Performing Arts department at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Leaves of the Poetry Tree combines music, American Sign Language and poetry with dance, and features a variety of styles including tap, ballet, modern/contemporary, hip-hop and jazz. Using inspiration found in children’s stories and poetry books, the family-friendly dance production addresses issues and challenges such as bullying, fear, death, racial differences, gender identity and equality. Deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing performers take the stage together, joined by young dancers from area public schools.

The show is directed by dancer, actor and NTID alumna and staff member Nicole Marie Cruz, and features set design by Erin Auble, costume design by Danica Zielinski, sound and projection by Dan Roach, and lighting by Nic Minetor.

Leaves of the Poetry Tree runs 7:30 p.m. Feb. 21-23, with 2 p.m. matinee performances Feb. 23-24, in NTID’s Panara Theatre, Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall. 

Tickets—$5 for students, senior citizens (60+) and children under 12, $10 for RIT faculty/staff/alumni, and $12 for the general public—are available online at www.rittickets.com, at the RIT University Arenas box office, 200 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, N.Y. 14623, or by calling 585-475-4121.

‘Rise Up: Silent Margins’ exhibit documents artist’s life as a deaf person

black and white checks at the bottom with a figure walking into grass and flowers with more red flowers at the top.

A collection of paintings on display at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf explores deafness in a unique and powerful way. “Rise Up: Silent Margins,” a collection of 17 paintings by RIT/NTID alumna Ashley Hannan, runs through Feb. 23 in NTID’s Dyer Arts Center Glass Room.

Hannan’s paintings document her journey of coming to terms with being deaf, having a cochlear implant and being the only deaf person in the mainstream schools she attended. Of her piece The Black Hole of Conflicted Identity, Hannan says, “Growing up, after having been educated at an oral deaf school with intensive speech therapy and audiology testing, I still felt incomplete. Though I was implanted with a cochlear implant at age 6, ‘fixing’ me still did not fill in the hole I had and still have in my identity. Thousands of dollars was spent on my education to perfect my listening and speech. It wasn’t until my young adult years I began to awaken and notice the conflict in my self-esteem stemmed from the lack of understanding that there is a deaf culture that is just as functional as the hearing world. I was apprehensive of delving into the deaf world for my identity for a long time.”

Of her piece Be True, Hannan says, “It took me many years, maybe three decades, to realize that all I needed to do was ‘be true’ to myself. Reject the envy of being ‘hearing’ and nurture the ‘flaw’ I have, my deafness. Emerge into something beautiful that always has been there.”

As part of the exhibit, Hannan, a graduate of RIT’s graphic design program, has created accompanying text that explains the symbolism within each piece.

A closing reception for the exhibit will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 22 and a painting party will be held Feb. 23, in the gallery.

The gallery is located on the RIT campus in Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall, 52 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Saturday. For more information, go to www.rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts/.

RIT/NTID alumnus Greg Pollock to keynote Let Freedom Ring event

Close up of light skinned male with short dark hair and short beard wearing grey shirt.

The Rochester Institute of Technology community will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with its second annual Let Freedom Ring event, featuring music, dance and excerpts from some of King’s most notable speeches. Performers include Thomas Warfield and the RIT/NTID Dance Company, the RIT String Quartet and keynote speaker Greg Pollock ’12 (professional and technical communication).

Pollock is the vice president of human resources and accessibility officer at PNC Financial Services in Pittsburgh. He started his career as a public affairs specialist at the Dow Chemical Co. As a student at RIT, Pollock served two terms as president of RIT’s Student Government (2010-2012), a rare occurrence, and was the only deaf RIT Student Government President to serve two terms.

“We are excited to bring the RIT community together to celebrate the holiday,” said Keith Jenkins, RIT’s vice president and associate provost for diversity and inclusion. “King’s work and words made an indelible impact on our nation’s conscience, and we invite all to join us as we reflect on the lessons he taught us.”

Let Freedom Ring takes place 10:30-11:30 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 21, in Ingle Auditorium. It will be followed by a reception with refreshments from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge. ASL interpreters have been requested. The event is free and open to the public, but attendees are encouraged to register at www.rit.edu/diversity/registerlfr.

Collaborative and accessible theater productions happen at RIT

Student actors in costume seated in front, female lifted by two males in center, dancers in back.

Rochester Institute of Technology shows how collaborative, accessible theater happens when deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing students perform on stage together as they did in the recent production of Cabaret. The show created a unique experience for theater-goers.

RIT among schools to receive $1 million for clean energy project

Light skinned female with long dark hair at podium with US flag and banner on energy in background.

Rochester Institute of Technology has won $1 million as part of the Energy to Lead Competition, which challenges New York colleges and universities to develop plans for local clean energy projects on campus and in their communities as the state seeks innovative solutions to combat climate change.

RIT will create a platform that integrates multiple data sources to enable a building’s existing automation system to manage operation schedules, adjust ventilation rates in classrooms and respond to peak demand days, according to Enid Cardinal, senior sustainability adviser to the president. Cardinal will serve as lead principal investigator on the project.

The platform, once tested and deployed at RIT, will be tested at Monroe Community College’s downtown campus and then made publicly available free of charge for other institutions to leverage. The project is expected to result in the avoidance of 108 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually.

“Through the ‘Energy to Lead’ competition, New York is fostering clean energy innovation to help fight climate change and protect our environment,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. “I commend the students and faculty for their steadfast commitment to improving their campus and community, helping to create a cleaner, greener New York for all.”

The Energy to Lead Competition, announced by Gov. Cuomo in 2015, is part of the REV Campus Challenge, which recognizes and supports colleges and universities across New York state that strive to meet their financial, environmental, academic and community goals through clean energy solutions.

As a signatory of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and member of the REV Campus Challenge, RIT has pledged to become carbon neutral by 2030.

“This project leverages many of RIT’s strengths, including our innovative spirit, the cutting-edge nature of our academic programs, and the way our campus serves as a laboratory for experiential learning,” RIT President David Munson said during yesterday’s announcement of the Energy to Lead grant inside RIT’s Golisano Institute for Sustainability. “We applaud Gov. Cuomo for investing in research that addresses solutions to global challenges and for recognizing the important role of higher education in working toward these solutions.”

Applicant schools were required to submit projects which demonstrate innovation in one or more of the following areas: project design, business model, partnerships, and/or curriculum integration. Schools and universities were also required to describe the project’s impact on greenhouse gas emissions, how they would measure success and how they would use the funding to advance the project. These projects are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2,125 metric tons over the next five years.

The competition is administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and open to two- or four-year public or private colleges or universities. The competition challenges schools to develop ideas for innovative projects in energy efficiency, renewable energy or greenhouse gas emission reduction on campus, in the classroom and in surrounding communities.   

This round of Energy to Lead included 24 project submissions from 21 different public and private colleges and universities across the state. Applications were reviewed by an evaluation panel and winners were chosen based on project cost effectiveness, innovativeness, energy efficiency and clean energy measures, the impact on greenhouse gas emissions and how funding would be used to advance the project on campus and in the community.

For more information on Energy to Lead, go to NYSERDA’s website.

RIT/NTID honors researchers with Sponsored Programs Awards

Group photo of 14 smiling men and women with orange flower corsages.

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf recently honored 12 researchers and program directors for their work leading to new knowledge, strategies or programs and services to improve the lives of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. 

Award recipients are:

Scholarship Portfolio Development Initiative (SPDI) – Internal seed funding opportunity for early-career faculty and contract research faculty, whose projects typically represent the initial stages of projects that could attract external support in the future. They are:

  • Robyn Dean, assistant professor in NTID’s American Sign Language and Interpreting Education Department: Investigating interpreter fatigue, and how it can be exaggerated or mitigated by varying the way in which pairs of interpreters work.
  • Jason Nordhaus, assistant professor in NTID’s Department of Science and Mathematics: Exploring the behavior of a black hole inside a giant star using dynamical 3D simulations.
  • Corrine Occhino, research assistant professor in NTID’s Sign Language Laboratory: Along with co-investigator Joseph Hill, examining the variations in ASL that correlate to diverse regional, racial, ethnic, and socio-economic factors and evaluating how ASL users regard the use of non-standard varieties of the language.
  • Jessica Trussell, assistant professor in NTID’s Master of Science program in Secondary Education and researcher in NTID’s Center for Education Research Partnerships: Developing and implementing an intensive approach to reading comprehension for deaf and hard-of-hearing readers that requires students to work in collaborative groups. 

NTID Sponsored Programs Awards – A new award program that recognizes individuals who have made a difference. Awardees are nominated by NTID faculty. Awards include:

Student Research Mentor Award to Bonnie Jacob, assistant professor in NTID’s Department of Science and Mathematics. Jacob’s work has supported 17 student researchers. She is the principal investigator of the first all-deaf and hard-of-hearing Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) program supported by the NSF. 

Up-and Coming PI Award to Jason Nordhaus, assistant professor in NTID’s Department of Science and Mathematics. Nordhaus is nationally known for research describing stellar evolution. He is affiliated with RIT’s College of Science and its world-renowned Center on Computational Relativity and Gravity (CCRG).

Collaborator Award to Keith Mousley, associate professor in NTID”s Department of Science and Mathematics. Mousley’s work collaborating with other researchers explores issues connected to teaching math and other STEM skills to deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

Co-PI Award to Myra Pelz, associate professor and co-PI for DeafTEC. For the past seven years, Pelz has been the full-time co-PI of DeafTEC, one of NTID’s signature programs with more than 29 partner high schools in 17 states.

PI Award to Matt Dye, assistant professor and Deaf x Laboratory director. Dye has successfully launched a long-range program of research in cognitive neuroscience supported by a total of seven awards from NIH, NSF, and the Swiss National Science Foundation, as well as one SPDI award. Dye’s funded projects presently employ a full-time research coordinator and a postdoctoral scholar, and support the efforts of graduate and undergraduate research assistants.

Partner Award to Matt Huenerfauth, associate professor in RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. Presented to a collaborator from one of RIT’s other colleges who has helped NTID realize its goals, the award recognized Huenerfauth as a key partner in projects investigating topics in mixed mode communication and communication technology. He is the founder of the Linguistic and Assistive Technologies Laboratory (“LATLab”), a bilingual (English / ASL) research lab.

Pioneer Award to Mike Stinson, professor and NTID research faculty member. This award recognizes Stinson for his pioneering work to develop speech-to-text technology for the higher education classroom, work that continues to the present in the guise of research on automated speech recognition. C-Print® is the first research-based speech-to-text (captioning) technology and service for educational usage, and has been used in educational environments across the country in grades 4 through postsecondary programs.

X-Factor Award to Donna Easton, research assistant, NTID’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Virtual Academic Community. The award, honoring those who support the work of a project team, was given to Easton for her critical contributions to 11 funded projects including C-Print® and the Virtual Academic Community.

Founders Award to Jim DeCaro, NTID dean emeritus. This award acknowledges a lifetime of achievement in educational programming for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community, along with DeCaro’s success in spreading the knowledge and educational expertise of NTID faculty around the world. DeCaro’s vision and drive also were instrumental in establishing NTID’s first dedicated research facility, Rosica Hall, which is presently at full occupancy with four centers, one major program, one research lab, and other research projects that are largely funded by external grants. 

“NTID’s 50th anniversary year is an excellent time to introduce this recognition program,” said Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “The program celebrates why principal investigators seek funding – because they need resources so that they can continue to make a difference in the world.”