Applied Computer Technology Associate in science degree

af29c061-2a40-4955-be67-8163516231da | 82987

Overview

The associate in science (AS) in applied computer technology is an associate+bachelor’s degree program designed to prepare deaf and hard-of-hearing students to enter and successfully complete a bachelor's degree in RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. This program is available for qualified deaf and hard of hearing students. 

The associate of science degree in applied computer technology is an Associate+Bachelor’s Degree Program, offered by RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, that prepares students to enter and successfully complete a bachelor’s degree program. The program offers you unparalleled academic support and students strengthen their skills by taking courses taught by NTID faculty.

You start with an AS is applied computer technology that provides you with the courses and credit you need to enroll in and successfully complete a bachelor’s degree program. Upon completion of your AS in applied computer technology, provided you maintain a 2.8 or higher grade point average in the program, you will enroll in RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, where you can choose to complete a bachelor’s degree in computing and information technologies, human-centered computing, or web and mobile computing.*

As a graduate of the Associate+Bachelor's Degree Program, you will be prepared for a variety of entry-level jobs in the computer support area including:

  • Networking and System Administrator
  • Web and Multimedia Content Developer
  • Programming and Application Developer
  • Wireless Data Networking Administrator

* Effective as of academic year 2018-2019 the web and mobile computing concentration in the applied computer technology AS program will not be offered. Students interested in a bachelor’s degree in web and mobile computing should begin their studies through enrollment in the mobile application development AAS program.

What does amazing look like?

Attend our Open House and you’ll get a pretty good idea.

Industries


  • Computer Networking

  • Internet and Software

  • Electronic and Computer Hardware

Curriculum

Applied Computer Technology (computing and information technologies concentration), AS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-131
Discrete Mathematics
This course is an introduction to the topics of discrete mathematics, including number systems, sets and logic, relations, combinatorial methods, graph theory, regular sets, vectors, and matrices.
4
NACA-160
Programming Fundamentals I
This course will provide students with a study of the fundamental concepts, logical structures, and algorithms inherent to computer programming. Students will learn how to write basic object-oriented programs in a contemporary programming language.
3
NACA-161
Programming Fundamentals II
This course builds upon the programming skills developed in Programming Fundamentals I and will cover more advanced object-oriented programming concepts, logical structures, and algorithms. Visual information system modeling, graphical user interfaces and software testing topics will be covered.
3
NACA-172
Website Development
This course introduces students to web page and small-scale website development. Through hands-on laboratory experiences, students will learn the fundamental concepts needed to construct web pages that follow appropriate coding standards as well as basic design principles to present content in an attractive and organized manner. Topics include HTML, CSS, graphical elements, website publishing, and transfer protocols.
3
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
NMTH-275
Advanced Mathematics
Topics from precalculus mathematics are studied with an emphasis on functions and graphs. Topics include the algebra of functions and the study of inverse functions. Rational, exponential, logarithmic and piecewise-defined functions are among those studied. Students, who earn credit for NMTH-275, cannot take NMTH-260 or NMTH-272.
3
NSSA-102
Computer Systems Concepts
This course teaches the student the essential technologies needed by NSSA majors, focused on PC and mainframe hardware topics. They include how those platforms operate, how they are configured, and the operation of their major internal components. Also covered are the basic operating system interactions with those platforms, physical security of assets, and computing-centric mathematical concepts.
3
UWRT-100
Critical Reading and Writing†
Critical Reading and Writing is a one semester, three-credit course limited to 15 students per section. This course is designed to help students develop the literacy practices they will need to be successful in their First-Year Writing course. Students will read, understand, interpret, and synthesize a variety of texts. Assignments are designed to challenge students intellectually, culturally and rhetorically. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will improve their writing by developing academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened in First-Year Writing. Particular attention will be given to critical reading, academic writing conventions, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity in academic writing. This course fulfills a Gen Ed free elective.
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  ISTE-110
   FYW: Ethics in Computing
Computing and the Internet are now integral parts of our lives. In this course, we consider and discuss how ethical theories and principles can inform and provide guidance about interactions and uses of computing technologies. Topics include the development interpretation, and application of ethical theory, moral values, personal responsibility, codes of conduct, ethics in the real and virtual worlds, intellectual property, and information security. This is a Writing Intensive (WI) course. Students are provided with guidance and opportunities for improving informal and formal writing skills. Grades received on writing assignments will constitute a significant component of the final course grade.
 
  UWRT-150
   FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
 
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
ISTE-121
Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain II
A second course in using the object-oriented approach to solving problems in the information domain. Students will learn: basic design principles and guidelines for developing graphical user interfaces, and use of the Event Model to implement graphical interfaces; algorithms for processing data structures; multithreading concepts and use of the Multithreading Model to design and implement advanced processing methods. Additional topics include the relational model of information organization, and the Client-Server model. Individual implementation projects are required. A team implementation exercise is used to provide students an opportunity to apply basic software development and project management practices in the context of a medium-scale project.
4
ISTE-190
Foundations of Modern Information Processing
Computer-based information processing is a foundation of contemporary society. As such, the protection of digital information, and the protection of systems that process this information has become a strategic priority for both the public and private sectors. This course provides an overview of information assurance and security concepts, practices, and trends. Topics include computing and networking infrastructures, risk, threats and vulnerabilities, legal and industry requirements for protecting information, access control models, encryption, critical national infrastructure, industrial espionage, enterprise backup, recovery, and business continuity, personal system security, and current trends and futures.
3
ISTE-230
Introduction to Database and Data Modeling
A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming.
3
ISTE-240
Web & Mobile II
This course builds on the basics of web page development that are presented in Web and Mobile I and extends that knowledge to focus on theories, issues, and technologies related to the design and development of web sites. An overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information architecture, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including HTTP, web client and server programming, and dynamic page generation from a database also will be explored. Development exercises are required.
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills.
4
NSSA-220
Task Automation Using Interpretive Languages
An introduction to the Unix operating system and scripting in the Perl and Unix shell languages. The course will cover basic user-level commands to the Unix operating system, followed by basic control structures, and data structures in Perl. Examples will include GUI programming, and interfacing to an underlying operating system. Following Perl, students will be introduced to the basics of shell programming using the Unix bash shell. Students will need one year of programming in an object-oriented language.
3
NSSA-241
Introduction to Routing and Switching
This course provides an introduction to wired network infrastructures, topologies, technologies, and the protocols required for effective end-to-end communication. Basic security concepts for TCP/IP based technologies are introduced. Networking layers 1, 2, and 3 are examined in-depth using the International Standards Organization’s Open Systems Interconnection and TCP/IP models as reference. Course topics focus on the TCP/IP protocol suite, the Ethernet LAN protocol, switching technology, and routed and routing protocols common in TCP/IP networks. The lab assignments mirror the lecture content , providing an experiential learning component for each topic covered.
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
63

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) is required based on placement. Students who satisfy the placement requirement may take any LAS Elective.

Applied computer technology (human-centered computing concentration), AS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NACA-160
Programming Fundamentals I
This course will provide students with a study of the fundamental concepts, logical structures, and algorithms inherent to computer programming. Students will learn how to write basic object-oriented programs in a contemporary programming language.
3
NACA-161
Programming Fundamentals II
This course builds upon the programming skills developed in Programming Fundamentals I and will cover more advanced object-oriented programming concepts, logical structures, and algorithms. Visual information system modeling, graphical user interfaces and software testing topics will be covered.
3
NACA-172
Website Development
This course introduces students to web page and small-scale website development. Through hands-on laboratory experiences, students will learn the fundamental concepts needed to construct web pages that follow appropriate coding standards as well as basic design principles to present content in an attractive and organized manner. Topics include HTML, CSS, graphical elements, website publishing, and transfer protocols.
3
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
NMDE-111
New Media Design Digital Survey I‡
This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery.
3
NMTH-275
Advanced Mathematics
Topics from precalculus mathematics are studied with an emphasis on functions and graphs. Topics include the algebra of functions and the study of inverse functions. Rational, exponential, logarithmic and piecewise-defined functions are among those studied. Students, who earn credit for NMTH-275, cannot take NMTH-260 or NMTH-272.
3
PSYC-223
Cognitive Psychology
This course examines how people perceive, learn, represent, remember and use information. Contemporary theory and research are surveyed in such areas as attention, pattern and object recognition, memory, knowledge representation, language acquisition and use, reasoning, decision making, problem solving, creativity, and intelligence. Applications in artificial intelligence and human/technology interaction may also be considered.
3
PSYC-101
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles): Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology.
3
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used.
3
UWRT-100
Critical Reading and Writing†
Critical Reading and Writing is a one semester, three-credit course limited to 15 students per section. This course is designed to help students develop the literacy practices they will need to be successful in their First-Year Writing course. Students will read, understand, interpret, and synthesize a variety of texts. Assignments are designed to challenge students intellectually, culturally and rhetorically. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will improve their writing by developing academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened in First-Year Writing. Particular attention will be given to critical reading, academic writing conventions, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity in academic writing. This course fulfills a Gen Ed free elective.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  ISTE-110
   FYW: Ethics in Computing (WI)
Computing and the Internet are now integral parts of our lives. In this course, we consider and discuss how ethical theories and principles can inform and provide guidance about interactions and uses of computing technologies. Topics include the development interpretation, and application of ethical theory, moral values, personal responsibility, codes of conduct, ethics in the real and virtual worlds, intellectual property, and information security. This is a Writing Intensive (WI) course. Students are provided with guidance and opportunities for improving informal and formal writing skills. Grades received on writing assignments will constitute a significant component of the final course grade.
 
  UWRT-150
   FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
 
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
ISTE-121
Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain II
A second course in using the object-oriented approach to solving problems in the information domain. Students will learn: basic design principles and guidelines for developing graphical user interfaces, and use of the Event Model to implement graphical interfaces; algorithms for processing data structures; multithreading concepts and use of the Multithreading Model to design and implement advanced processing methods. Additional topics include the relational model of information organization, and the Client-Server model. Individual implementation projects are required. A team implementation exercise is used to provide students an opportunity to apply basic software development and project management practices in the context of a medium-scale project.
4
ISTE-240
Web & Mobile II
This course builds on the basics of web page development that are presented in Web and Mobile I and extends that knowledge to focus on theories, issues, and technologies related to the design and development of web sites. An overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information architecture, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including HTTP, web client and server programming, and dynamic page generation from a database also will be explored. Development exercises are required.
3
ISTE-252
Foundations of Mobile Design
This course is an introduction to designing, prototyping, and creating applications and web applications for mobile devices. These devices include a unique set of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Topics covered include user interaction patterns, connectivity, interface design, software design patterns, and application architectures. Programming projects are required.
3
ISTE-262
Foundations of Human Centered Computing
This course explores how the fields of psychology, digital design, and computing converge in the design, development, and evaluation of new technologies that people find effective and enjoyable to use. Students will investigate the field of human-computer interaction (HCI), with a focus on how users' various sensory, motor, and cognitive abilities are essential to their successful use of technology. Students will be exposed to modern research methods and paradigms in field of human-computer interaction, including predictive modeling, heuristic evaluation, interpretive methods, and experimental user testing. Students will learn key design principles and guidelines and apply them to analyze existing designs and conduct a design process that is centered on human users of technology.
4
PSYC-250
Research Methods I
This course will serve as an introduction to research methods in psychology, with the goal of understanding research design, analysis and writing. Topics include examining the variety of methods used in psychology research, understanding research eth-ics, developing empirical hypotheses, designing experiments, understanding statistical concepts, interpreting results, and writing research and review papers in APA style. This is a required course for all psychology majors, and is restricted to students in the psychology program.
3
STAT-146
Introduction to Statistics II
This course is an elementary introduction to the topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs.
4
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
63

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) is required based on placement. Students who satisfy the placement requirement may take any LAS Elective.

‡ Raster and Vector Graphics (NAIS-130) AS/BS Section (only) may be substituted for NMDE-111.

Applied Computer Technology (web and mobile computing concentration), AS degree, typical course sequence‡

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-131
Discrete Mathematics
This course is an introduction to the topics of discrete mathematics, including number systems, sets and logic, relations, combinatorial methods, graph theory, regular sets, vectors, and matrices.
4
NACA-160
Programming Fundamentals I
This course will provide students with a study of the fundamental concepts, logical structures, and algorithms inherent to computer programming. Students will learn how to write basic object-oriented programs in a contemporary programming language.
3
NACA-161
Programming Fundamentals II
This course builds upon the programming skills developed in Programming Fundamentals I and will cover more advanced object-oriented programming concepts, logical structures, and algorithms. Visual information system modeling, graphical user interfaces and software testing topics will be covered.
3
NACA-172
Website Development
This course introduces students to web page and small-scale website development. Through hands-on laboratory experiences, students will learn the fundamental concepts needed to construct web pages that follow appropriate coding standards as well as basic design principles to present content in an attractive and organized manner. Topics include HTML, CSS, graphical elements, website publishing, and transfer protocols.
3
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
NMDE-111
New Media Design Digital Survey I§
This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery.
3
NMTH-275
Advanced Mathematics
Topics from precalculus mathematics are studied with an emphasis on functions and graphs. Topics include the algebra of functions and the study of inverse functions. Rational, exponential, logarithmic and piecewise-defined functions are among those studied. Students, who earn credit for NMTH-275, cannot take NMTH-260 or NMTH-272.
3
UWRT-100
Critical Reading and Writing†
Critical Reading and Writing is a one semester, three-credit course limited to 15 students per section. This course is designed to help students develop the literacy practices they will need to be successful in their First-Year Writing course. Students will read, understand, interpret, and synthesize a variety of texts. Assignments are designed to challenge students intellectually, culturally and rhetorically. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will improve their writing by developing academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened in First-Year Writing. Particular attention will be given to critical reading, academic writing conventions, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity in academic writing. This course fulfills a Gen Ed free elective.
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  ISTE-110
   FYW: Ethics in Computing
Computing and the Internet are now integral parts of our lives. In this course, we consider and discuss how ethical theories and principles can inform and provide guidance about interactions and uses of computing technologies. Topics include the development interpretation, and application of ethical theory, moral values, personal responsibility, codes of conduct, ethics in the real and virtual worlds, intellectual property, and information security. This is a Writing Intensive (WI) course. Students are provided with guidance and opportunities for improving informal and formal writing skills. Grades received on writing assignments will constitute a significant component of the final course grade.
 
  UWRT-150
   FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
 
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
ISTE-121
Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain II
A second course in using the object-oriented approach to solving problems in the information domain. Students will learn: basic design principles and guidelines for developing graphical user interfaces, and use of the Event Model to implement graphical interfaces; algorithms for processing data structures; multithreading concepts and use of the Multithreading Model to design and implement advanced processing methods. Additional topics include the relational model of information organization, and the Client-Server model. Individual implementation projects are required. A team implementation exercise is used to provide students an opportunity to apply basic software development and project management practices in the context of a medium-scale project.
4
ISTE-222
Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain III
The third course in the programming sequence expanding the student’s knowledge base of higher level programming concepts including data structures, algorithm development and analysis, Big-O notation, directed graphs, priority queues, performance, and a greater understanding of how complex software can more easily be designed. Programming assignments are required.
3
ISTE-230
Introduction to Database and Data Modeling
A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming.
3
ISTE-240
Web & Mobile II
This course builds on the basics of web page development that are presented in Web and Mobile I and extends that knowledge to focus on theories, issues, and technologies related to the design and development of web sites. An overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information architecture, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including HTTP, web client and server programming, and dynamic page generation from a database also will be explored. Development exercises are required.
3
ISTE-260
Designing the User Experience
The user experience is an important design element in the development of interactive systems. This course presents the foundations of user-centered design principles within the context of human-computer interaction (HCI). Students will explore and practice HCI methods that span the development lifecycle from requirements analysis and creating the product/service vision through system prototyping and usability testing. Leading edge interface technologies are examined. Group-based exercises and design projects are required.
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills.
3
NSSA-290
Networking Essentials for Developers
This is a course in the basics of network communication for software developers. Topics will include the OSI 7-layer model and its realization in the TCP/IP protocol stack. Students will also learn about naming and name resolution as it is used in the internet, plus the basics of routing and switching. The focus in all of this will be on an analysis of how name resolution, routing and switching operate at the developer's perspective. The specifics of how the socket transport layer appears to the programmer and operates will be a key topic. Finally, an overview of authentication mechanisms and number of examples of the security vulnerabilities of existing communication protocols will be provided to instruct students on the inherent risks of communication via the INTERNET.
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
62

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) is required based on placement. Students who satisfy the placement requirement may take any LAS Elective.

‡ Effective as of academic year 2018-19, the web and mobile computing concentration in the applied computer technology AS program will not be offered. Students interested in a bachelor’s degree in web and mobile computing should begin their studies through enrollment in the mobile application development AAS program.

§ Raster and Vector Graphics (NAIS-130) AS/BS Section (only) may be substituted for NMDE-111.

 

Admission Requirements

For the AS Degree Leading to Bachelor’s Degree (Associate+Bachelor’s Program)

  • 2 years of math required; students interested in engineering, math and science transfer programs should have three or more years of math.
  • 1 year of science required; students interested in engineering, math and science transfer programs should have two or more years of science.
  • Physics is recommended for students interested in engineering.
  • English language skills as evidenced by application materials determine associate degree options.

Specific Requirements

The following prerequisites are necessary for admission into the applied computer technology AS major:

  • ACT: Composite test score of 18 or better
  • English: Placement into a First Year Writing course, such as FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150).
  • Mathematics: Entrance into NTID’s NMTH-275 Advanced Math.  

Learn about admissions and financial aid