Precision Manufacturing Technology Associate in occupational studies degree

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Overview

Students in the associate in occupational studies (AOS) degree in precision manufacturing technology (formerly computer integrated machining technology) are prepared for employment in precision machining and/or precision optics manufacturing occupations. These include tool and die making, mold making, instrument making, manufacturing of optical elements, and computer numerical control machining (CNC). Graduates are successfully employed in both large manufacturing corporations and small contract manufacturing shops. This program is available for qualified deaf and hard of hearing students. 

The precision manufacturing technology program, offered by RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, prepares you for immediate employment upon graduation. Some of the job responsibilities for graduates include: set up and operate lathes, milling machine tools, grinders, polishers, computer numerical controlled machine tools, and computer-aided manufacturing (i.e., 5-axis); shape material into precision parts by conventional and nonconventional processes; follow blueprints; and use advanced measuring techniques to inspect work.

Cooperative education

As a student in the precision manufacturing technology program, you will be required to complete a cooperative (co-op) work experience prior to graduation. You may schedule your co-op after completing your second-year academic requirements.

 

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Industries


  • Manufacturing

  • Construction

  • Automotive

  • Aerospace

Typical Job Titles

Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Operator Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Programmer Trainee
Tool and Die Maker Instrument Maker
Mold Maker Pattern Maker
Model Maker Machinist

Curriculum

Precision Manufacturing Technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
NCIM-101
Blueprint Reading I
Students develop the basic skills necessary to read and interpret fundamental engineering drawings of details, subassemblies, and assemblies.
3
NCIM-121
Precision Measurement I
Students develop the skills necessary to measure to the highest tolerances commonly used in industry. They measure parts or groups of parts using industrial methods and equipment. Analysis of measurements and problem solving are stressed.
3
NCIM-131
Computer Integrated Machining Tech I
In this first course of a six course sequence, students develop basic skills for operating manual and computer controlled machine tools. Laboratory instruction simulates introductory level work in an industrial environment; student work is held to ANSI and ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safe work habits are cultivated, and industrial safety rules are highly stressed during this course.
3
NCIM-132
Computer Integrated Machining Technology II
In this second course in a six course sequence, students continue to develop basic skills for operating manual and computer controlled machine tools. Laboratory instruction simulates moderate level work in an industrial environment; student work is held to ANSI and ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safe work habits are cultivated, and industrial safety rules are continually stressed during this course.
3
NCIM-214
CAD Applications
Students develop engineering skills in engineering graphics and solid modeling. Students will primarily use computer-aided drafting (CAD) as a tool to generate 2D graphics and 3D solid models. The course is laboratory oriented and provides the student with basic skills in spatial visualization, freehand sketching, parametric solid modeling, and creation of engineering drawings which meet industrial drafting standards.
3
NENG-212
Career English I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. It is designed to develop reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary skills that students need for AOS course work and for the work environment. The reading and writing components are thoroughly integrated with approximately equal time being devoted to each. Grammar and vocabulary are thoroughly integrated into the reading and writing components. Course content includes general and technical articles, memorandums, letters, electronic communication, directions, work-related forms, and short report.
3
NENG-213
Career English II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. It is designed to advance and refine reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary skills that students need for AOS course work and for the work environment. The reading and writing components are thoroughly integrated with approximately equal time being devoted to each. Grammar and vocabulary are thoroughly integrated into the reading and writing components. Course content includes general and technical articles, memorandums, letters, electronic communication, directions, work-related forms, and short reports.
3
NMTH-206
Trigonometry for Coordinate Analysis
Students will study right triangle trigonometry with an emphasis on concepts and applications related to computer integrated machining technology (CIMT). Topics include trigonometric ratios in right triangles, coordinate geometry calculations, circle properties, simple and complex machine applications, and 3-D coordinate geometry.
3
 
NTID LAS Foundation: Mathematics†
3
Second Year
NCIM-201
Job Search Process for CIMT
Course goals are to prepare students to secure a cooperative or professional work experience in the student's major and to assist the student in acquiring the skills for accessing information, networking, developing resumes and letters, completing various employment-related forms, interviewing, and using various communication techniques in preparing students for the job search process.
2
NCIM-222
Precision Measurement II
Students enhance the measurement skills learned in Precision Measurement I. The emphasis of this course will be on using the principals of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing to inspect machine parts. Emphasis will be placed on developing appropriate and repeatable inspection setups. Hands on experience with Optical Comparators and Coordinate Measuring Machines will be included.
3
NCIM-233
Computer Integrated Machining Technology III
In this third course of a six course sequence, students continue to develop basic skills for operating manual and computer controlled machine tools. Laboratory instruction simulates moderate level work in an industrial environment; student work is held to ANSI and ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safe work habits are cultivated, and industrial safety rules are continually stressed during this course.
3
NCIM-234
Computer Integrated Machining Technology IV
In this fourth course of a six course sequence, students continue to develop basic skills for operating manual and computer controlled machine tools. Laboratory instruction simulates moderate level work in an industrial environment; student work is held to ANSI and ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safe work habits are cultivated and industrial safety rules are continually stressed during this course.
3
NCIM-241
Precision Optics Manufacturing I
In this course students learn and apply basic optical principles used in conventional manufacturing of precision optical flat elements. Procedures and techniques include blocking, vertical rotary grinding, rough bench grinding, double-sided lapping/grinding, polishing, deblocking and centering. Students practice and apply appropriate handling, cleaning and visual inspection techniques. A brief introduction to spherical grinding will be included.
3
NCIM-251
Computer Numerical Control I
Students develop basic skills in programming CNC machine tools. Laboratory instruction simulates industrial environments in both the precision machining industry and the precision optics industry; student work is held to ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safety in the operation of automated machines is an integral part of the course.
3
NCIM-252
Computer Numerical Control II
Students develop basic skills in programming CNC machine tools. Laboratory instruction simulates industrial environments in both the precision machining industry and the precision optics industry; student work is held to ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safety in the operation of automated machines is an integral part of the course.
3
NCIM-254
Introduction to Computer Aided Manufacturing
This course studies modern prototyping and manufacturing methods to create Computer Numerical Control (CNC) programs. Using the students’ knowledge of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and the operations of Computer Numerical Control (CNC), they develop CNC programs, by means of Computer Assisted Manufacturing (CAM) systems. Using commercial CAM software, students will convert 2D drawings and 3D CAD models into CNC toolpaths. Students’ output will be tested on two-axis and three-axis machining centers.
3
NCIM-299
Co-op Study: CIMT
Students develop machining skills with on the job training at actual industrial facilities. This experience must contain a minimum of 350 hours of related work experience.
0
 
NTID LAS Perspective (scientific processes)§
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
NCIM Program Technical Elective
3
Third Year
NCIM-235
Computer Integrated Machining Technology V
This fifth course of a six course sequence is the capstone for the students' program. After selecting a unique project, students control all aspects of its creation. Together with the laboratory section of this course, students discuss and perform all tasks associated with the manufacturing process. Tasks include innovative concepts and design, planning, procurement, scheduling, documenting, manufacturing, assembling, and presentation. Students must develop and deliver this project on-time and within budget.
3
NCIM-236
Computer Integrated Machining Technology V Lab
This sixth course of a six course sequence is the capstone for the students' program. After selecting a unique project, students control all aspects of its creation. Together with the classroom section of this course, students perform all tasks associated with the manufacturing process. Taking designs and decisions made in the classroom, students use industrial machine tools to create and assemble the final project. Lab activities include machining and assembling. Students must deliver this project on-time and within budget.
3
 
NTID LAS Perspective‡
3
 
NCIM Program Technical Elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
68

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-180 or higher

‡ NTID LAS Perspective course may be from any of these three Perspective categories: ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies; Communication, Social & Global Awareness; and Creative and Innovative Exploration

§ Any scientific processes course NSCI-120 or higher.

Electives

Course
NCIM-102
Blueprint Reading II
In this second blueprint reading course, students continue to develop the skills necessary to read and interpret prints of engineering drawings of details and assemblies. More emphasis is placed on Metric drawings and Geometric Tolerances as applied to engineering drawings and part inspection.
NCIM-237
Precision Grinding
Students develop basic skills for precision grinding techniques. Students learn about abrasives and grinding operations, with special focus on surface and center type cylindrical grinding. Laboratory exercises simulate moderately difficult precision work produced and inspected in an industrial environment. Students' work is held to ANSI and ISO referenced standards for dimensional and geometric accuracy. Safe work habits are cultivated and industrial safety rules are continually stressed during this course.
NCIM-242
Precision Optics Manufacturing II
This course is the second in a sequence of courses in which students learn to apply basic principles of conventional and CNC manufacturing of optical elements. The emphasis in this course will be on the production of simple convex and concave spherical elements. Procedures and techniques include curve generating, blocking, rough and fine grinding, stick polishing, deblocking and centering. Students practice and apply appropriate handling and visual inspection techniques.
NCIM-253
Advanced CNS Concepts
This course is for students who want to learn more in-depth techniques related to CNC programming, process development and control, and product fixturing techniques using turning and milling centers. Students will develop more advanced knowledge of coding and editing parts using CAM/CAD software. A blend of practical theory and hands-on experience is required to perform complex setups in CNC machining centers. This includes CAD/CAM operations, program analysis, troubleshooting the solid model preparation, and the communication between CNC controls and CAD/CAM programs.

Admission Requirements

For the career-focused AOS Degree

  • 2 years of math required
  • 1 year of science required
  • English language skills as evidenced by application materials determine associate degree options.

Specific Requirements

Successful completion of a sampling experience either through the Summer Vestibule Program or an equivalent career exploration course is a prerequisite, as are the following:

  • English: Placement into Career English I (NENG-212) or above. Students successfully completing AOS degrees typically enter with reading scores of 79 or higher on the NTID Reading Test and writing scores of 39 or higher on the NTID Writing Test.
  • Mathematics: Placement into Foundations of Algebra (NMTH-180) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.
  • Science: Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least two years of high school science.

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