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RIT/NTID’s ‘Dial M for Murder’ runs Feb. 28-March 1

17 Feb

Light skinned male with striped scarf standing with darker skinned male wearing hat. Light skinned male with ponytail in back.

The Alfred Hitchcock classic Dial M for Murder has a new twist as Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf Performing Arts translates the play into American Sign Language, making it accessible to deaf audiences. The show, which runs at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29, and 2 p.m. Feb. 29 and March 1, at NTID’s 1510 Lab Theatre, enlists RIT students from the College of Liberal Arts as voice actors, making the production a full experience for deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing audiences.

During the production, deaf and hard-of-hearing audience members can experience cutting-edge closed-captioning technology using smartglasses developed by Vuzix Corp. The technology, designed for live performances, combines access services with augmented reality. The remote interpretation and captioning services platform application has been placed into service in businesses, educational institutions and most recently, the Pro Football Hall of Fame museum. Vuzix will eventually refine the technology to impact access services for movie franchises, theater companies, and home television.

Those familiar with Dial M for Murder will enjoy this interpretation of the play’s dark themes. After learning of an affair, former English professional tennis player Tony Wendice, played by NTID alumnus Dack Virnig ’11 (arts and imaging studies), decides to hire a man to murder his socialite wife, Margot, played by Shaylee Fogelberg, a design and imaging technology major from Rochester, N.Y. Tony’s plot fails and the evidence is twisted, making it appear as though Margot has killed the man hired to murder her.

Dial M for Murder, which was written for stage and screen by Frederick Knott, is directed by Luane Davis Haggerty, principle lecturer at NTID, and features cameos by RIT President David Munson and deaf classical actor Patrick Graybill. Supporting actors are Samuel Langshteyn, a film and animation major from New York, N.Y.; M.K. Winegarner, an ASL-English interpretation major from Rochester, N.Y.; and NTID alumna Niki McKeown ’00 (arts and computer design).

Performing arts at RIT has a history of delighting audiences with top-quality productions. Most recently, the university’s productions of August Wilson’s Fences and the play I and You were honored by the Kennedy Center College Theater Festival.

“Performing Arts on campus is clearly coming into its own and breaking new ground with each production,” said Davis Haggerty. “NTID’s production of Dial M for Murder is building on this energy and is a clever mix of theatrical art and technology. It’s a production that audiences will not want to miss.”

Tickets for Dial M for Murder are free and can be reserved at Eventbrite.

RIT/NTID’s ‘Dial M for Murder’ runs Feb. 28-March 1

17 Feb

Light skinned male with striped scarf standing with darker skinned male wearing hat. Light skinned male with ponytail in back.

The Alfred Hitchcock classic Dial M for Murder has a new twist as Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf Performing Arts translates the play into American Sign Language, making it accessible to deaf audiences. The show, which runs at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 28 and 29, and 2 p.m. Feb. 29 and March 1, at NTID’s 1510 Lab Theatre, enlists RIT students from the College of Liberal Arts as voice actors, making the production a full experience for deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing audiences.

During the production, deaf and hard-of-hearing audience members can experience cutting-edge closed-captioning technology using smartglasses developed by Vuzix Corp. The technology, designed for live performances, combines access services with augmented reality. The remote interpretation and captioning services platform application has been placed into service in businesses, educational institutions and most recently, the Pro Football Hall of Fame museum. Vuzix will eventually refine the technology to impact access services for movie franchises, theater companies, and home television.

Those familiar with Dial M for Murder will enjoy this interpretation of the play’s dark themes. After learning of an affair, former English professional tennis player Tony Wendice, played by NTID alumnus Dack Virnig ’11 (arts and imaging studies), decides to hire a man to murder his socialite wife, Margot, played by Shaylee Fogelberg, a design and imaging technology major from Rochester, N.Y. Tony’s plot fails and the evidence is twisted, making it appear as though Margot has killed the man hired to murder her.

Dial M for Murder, which was written for stage and screen by Frederick Knott, is directed by Luane Davis Haggerty, principle lecturer at NTID, and features cameos by RIT President David Munson and deaf classical actor Patrick Graybill. Supporting actors are Samuel Langshteyn, a film and animation major from New York, N.Y.; M.K. Winegarner, an ASL-English interpretation major from Rochester, N.Y.; and NTID alumna Niki McKeown ’00 (arts and computer design).

Performing arts at RIT has a history of delighting audiences with top-quality productions. Most recently, the university’s productions of August Wilson’s Fences and the play I and You were honored by the Kennedy Center College Theater Festival.

“Performing Arts on campus is clearly coming into its own and breaking new ground with each production,” said Davis Haggerty. “NTID’s production of Dial M for Murder is building on this energy and is a clever mix of theatrical art and technology. It’s a production that audiences will not want to miss.”

Tickets for Dial M for Murder are free and can be reserved at Eventbrite.

RIT named one of the best colleges to study video game design

13 Feb

male and female students watch as one works on several large computer display monitors.

Animation Career Review has again named Rochester Institute of Technology one of the top game design schools in the country. RIT ranked seventh on the list of Top 50 Game Design Schools in the U.S. and second in New York state.

The 2020 rankings considered 136 colleges with game design programs. The annual rankings were created by Animation Career Review, an online resource for aspiring animation, game design and development, graphic design and digital art professionals. The list also named RIT the No. 3 game design school on the East Coast and fifth-best private school nationally.

“We are happy that RIT is consistently recognized as one of the best schools in game design and development,” said David Schwartz, director of RIT’s School of Interactive Games and Media (IGM). “Faculty and staff in IGM work hard to provide core computing education within the context of game design, so our students have amazing career opportunities.”

Animation Career Review noted that RIT offers several programs for aspiring game designers, including two bachelor’s degrees and one master’s. In fact, any student studying computing in RIT’s Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences has the opportunity to minor in game design and development. Students outside of technical computing majors can also minor in game design.

RIT’s Bachelor of Science in game design and development provides a broad-based undergraduate education in computing while exposing students to the breadth of game design and development processes. The bachelor’s program in new media interactive development also explores casual games, in addition to new technologies and experiences with web, wearable and mobile computing.

Students who pursue a master’s degree in game design and development at RIT focus on the technical roots in the computing and information sciences disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the development landscape through involvement in topics, including computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative and game world design. The degree culminates with a capstone project in which students create their own games.

RIT game design students can also work with RIT’s MAGIC Center, a nonprofit university-wide research and development laboratory and a for-profit production studio that assists in efforts to bring digital media creations up to marketplace standards and commercialization. RIT’s MAGIC Spell Studios, which moved into a new state-of-the-art building in 2018, focuses on nurturing and growing new companies and publishing and distributing their projects.

The ranking also highlights RIT’s emphasis on cooperative education—full-time paid work experiences that provide students with an opportunity to learn on the job in real-world industry settings. With help from the co-op program, graduates of RIT’s game design and development programs go on to work at companies including Microsoft, Rockstar Games, Sony Interactive Entertainment, Valve Corp. and Walt Disney Interactive.

The full game design school rankings can be found on the Animation Career Review 2020 Game Design Rankings website.

From archery to nerfology, RIT redfines wellness

11 Feb

Two students participate in an archery wellness course.

Wellness classes at Rochester Institute of Technology are nothing like the gym classes students are required to take in high school. RIT offers 180 wellness course options for students to promote holistic wellness, and requires all undergraduates to complete two wellness courses before they can graduate. Courses vary from traditional indoor cycling, swimming, dance, soccer, and bowling, to power skating, yoga, and fencing. More.

RIT ranked a ‘Best Value College for 2020’

7 Feb

A group of students walking together in summer. two females are high-fiving.

Rochester Institute of Technology has been named among “Best Value Colleges for 2020” by The Princeton Review.

The project analyzes 40 data points for more than 650 of the nation’s 4,000 colleges and universities. Only 200 made the final list. Topics covered include academics, cost, financial aid, career services, graduation rates, student debt and alumni support. Princeton Review also used data from its surveys of students attending the colleges and PayScale.com surveys of alumni regarding their starting and mid-career salaries and job satisfaction.

“The schools we chose as our Best Value Colleges for 2020 comprise only 7% of the nation’s four-year colleges,” noted Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s editor-in-chief. “They are truly distinctive and diverse in their programs, size, region, and type, yet they are similar in three areas. Every school we selected offers outstanding academics, generous financial aid and/or relative low cost of attendance, and stellar career services. We recommend them highly to college applicants and parents seeking schools that are academically top-notch and committed to making their programs affordable. These colleges are also standouts at guiding their students to rewarding futures.”