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The Comics Scare Returns

The Comics Scare Returns
The Contemporary Resurgence of Horror Comics

 The popularity of horror comics in the 1950s was curtailed by a suppression of popular horror stories by those concerned with juvenile delinquency and bad taste. Thirty years later, creators Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman produced popular and artful comics like Swamp Thing and The Sandman that took advantage of the new shape of American culture in the 1980s. Terrence Wandtke details the history and re-shaping of horror comics and its relevance to popular series such as HellboyThe Goon, and The Walking Dead


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Overview

 The popularity of horror comics in the 1950s was curtailed by a suppression of popular horror stories by those concerned with juvenile delinquency and bad taste. Thirty years later, creators Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman produced popular and artful comics like Swamp Thing and The Sandman that took advantage of the new shape of American culture in the 1980s. Terrence Wandtke details the history and re-shaping of horror comics and its relevance to popular series such as HellboyThe Goon, and The Walking Dead

Terrence Wandtke is a professor of literature and media studies at Judson University in Elgin, Illinois where he teaches classes in comic books, contemporary literature, and media theory. His research focuses on the historical trends and revisionism associated with comic books. He is the author of The Dark Night Returns: The Contemporary Resurgence of Crime Comics (RIT Press) and The Meaning of Superhero Comic Books (McFarland) and he is the editor of Ed Brubaker: Conversations (University Press of Mississippi) and The Amazing Transforming Superhero: Essays on the Revision of Characters in Comic Books, Film, and Television (McFarland).

Details

Publisher: RIT Press (11/2018)
ISBN-13: 9781939125514
Binding: Softcover
Pages: 344
Size: 7 x 10 in.
Shipping Weight: 1lb

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