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Visual Communication: Perception, Rhetoric, and Technology

Visual Communication: Perception, Rhetoric, and Technology
Visual Communication: Perception, Rhetoric, and Technology
Visual Communication: Perception, Rhetoric, and Technology
Papers from the William A. Kern Conferences in Visual Communication, Rochester Institute of Technology
Edited By Diane S. Hope

Visual Communication: Perception, Rhetoric and Technology, Diane Hope sets a standard for theoretical exploration far too few scholars attempt.


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Overview

Visual Communication: Perception, Rhetoric and Technology, Diane Hope sets a standard for theoretical exploration far too few scholars attempt. Not only does this leader in visual communication scholarship spotlight the illusory but significant power of the visual, but she also calls for attention to the visual as "a foundational core within the discipline of communication." Her clarifying introduction effectively outlines the sometimes conflicting but nevertheless contingent intersections of cognitive, discursive and mechanical forces at work in visual communication, whether those forces be visual artifacts, visual practices, or most important, the role of the visual in meaning making and identity formation. In the heart of the book nestle more than 200 pages of thought-provoking chapters by visual scholars Hope has pulled together from her seminal conferences on "Visual Communication: Rhetoric and Technology." Appropriately, the list of scholars proves as eclectic as the field of visual communication itself, following the full circle from experts in cognitive processing to economists. The topics they tackle follow suit. Consider, for example, Ann Marie Barry's masterful exegesis on the influences of videogames on memory, Kevin Michael DeLuca's insightful concern about domesticating images for the sake of study, or Brian Snee's reasoned critique of the implications of Bowling for Columbine on the concept of free speech. To top it off, this refreshing tome includes black-and-white and color reproductions that make the book even more useful to students and visual scholars. Take a look for yourself: compare Willliam Joyce's image of children and Santa with Kodak's diorama of a family at Christmas, or contrast Ben Long's fresco of the goddess Hecate in a southern landscape with Rick Williams’ images of Texas workers. As Hope writes, "The multiple processes of visual functions make evident the power of images to communicate and confuse." Hope’s book clears a path to the hub of the maze. —Julianne H. Newton, Associate Professor of Visual Communication, University of Oregon, award-winning scholar, teacher and photographer, author of Burden of Visual Truth: the Role of Photojournalism in Mediating Reality, and editor of Visual Communication Quarterly

 

Details

Publisher: Hampton Press in collaboration with RIT Cary Graphic Arts Press (01/2006)
ISBN-10: 1-57273-669-0
ISBN-13: 978-1-57273-669-6
Binding: softcover
Pages: 309
Illustrations: 66 illustrations and tables
Size: 6 x 9 in.
Shipping Weight: 1lb
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