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Biomedical Sciences bachelor of science degree

Robert Osgood, Program Director
585-475-7902, robert.osgood@rit.edu

Program overview

The biomedical sciences major prepares students for advanced study in various areas of health care (e.g. medicine, dentistry, nursing, public health), research, or for direct entry into a health care career. The diverse curriculum includes a broad array of elective courses and offers students career-relevant experiential learning opportunities where they can apply the knowledge they gain in the classroom to real-world experiences. Comprehensive academic and faculty advising is complemented by a pre-medical/pre-health professions advising system that provides guidance to students in their selection of course work and in completing the requirements necessary for admission to advanced degree programs.

Employment opportunities in the biomedical sciences continue to grow and develop—driven in part by advances in biotechnology and the need for more research and better treatments for current and emerging health care and public policy challenges, including diabetes, cancer, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. Courses are designed to provide the knowledge base and the technical skills necessary to address these challenges and are required in a broad spectrum of medical and health care related careers.

Plan of study

The major's curricular requirements are flexible. The program’s core is designed to provide students with a strong grounding in mathematics and science. A complement of liberal arts courses and an array of professional electives, prepare students for a particular career path—e.g., entry into graduate study, including medical/dental school—or a research position in an applied area of biomedical science. Students may choose to use elective credits to engage in undergraduate research with a faculty mentor, pursue a double major, or select a secondary field of study through a minor.

Curriculum

Biomedical sciences, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIOL-101 General Biology I  3
BIOL-103 General Biology I Lab 1
CHMG-141 LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): General and Analytical Chemistry I  3
CHMG-145 General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab 1
BIOL-102 General Biology II  3
BIOL-104 General Biology II Lab 1
CHMG-142 LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles): General and Analytical Chemistry II  3
CHMG-146 General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab 1
MATH-161 LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Applied Calculus 4
ACSC-010 Year One 0
  LAS Perspective 1 (ethical) 3
  First Year LAS Elective 3
  First Year Writing 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MEDS-250 Anatomy and Physiology and Lab 4
MEDS-251 Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab 4
BIOL-201 Cellular and Molecular Biology 4
Choose one of the following: 3
   STAT-145     LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Introduction to Statistics I  
   STAT-155     LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Introduction to Biostatistics  
  Chemistry Sequence Courses 7
  LAS Perspective 2 (artistic) 3
  LAS Perspective 3 (global) 3
  Professional Elective 3
Third Year
  Program Elective Requirements 12
  Professional Electives  9
  Professional Elective (WI) 3
  LAS Perspective 4 (social) 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Fourth Year
  Program Elective Requirement 6
  Professional Electives 6
  Free Electives 12
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Electives

Biomedical sciences program electives

Each student must choose a minimum of two courses from each category (for a minimum total of 18 SCH) of Program Electives below. One course cannot be used more than once to this requirement. Additional courses from the list below of from the list of professional electives may be used to meet professional elective requirements.

Medical foundations
Course
MEDS-530 Immunology
MEDS-417 Clinical Microbiology
MEDS-418 Clinical Microbiology Lab
MEDS-422 Endocrinology
MEDS-425 Introduction to Neuroscience
MEDS-520 Human Histology
Medicine and disease
Course
MED-245 Medical Genetics
MEDS-313 Introduction to Infectious Disease
MEDS-421 Parasitology
MEDS-430 Epidemiology and Public Health
MEDS-515 Med Pathphysiology
Medicine and health
Course
MEDS-352 Coaching Healthy Behavior
MEDS-402 Medical Ethics Case Studies
Choose one of the following:
   MEDS-361    Applied Psychophys and Self Regulation
   MEDS-360    Placebo Effect
Choose one of the following:
   MEDS-426    Addiction Pharmacology 
   MEDS-311    Diagnosing Criminal Minds
Choose one of the following:
   NUTR-215    Contemporary Nutrition 
   NUTR 300    Sports Nutrition
Biomedical sciences professional electives
Course
BIOL-314 Tissue Culture
BIOL-265 Evolutionary Biology
BIOL-303 Cell Physiology
BIOL-204 Intro to Microbiology
BIOL-305 Plants, Medicine, and Technology
BIOL-415 Virology
BIOL-322 Developmental Biology
BIOL-427 Micro and Viral Genetics
BIOL-450 Genetic Engineering
BIOL-321 Genetics
BIOL-365 Introduction to Population Genetics
BIOL-412 Human Genetics
BIOL-306 Food Microbiology
BIOL-340 Genomics
BIOL-375 Advanced Immunology 
BIOL-428 Eukaryotic Gene Regulation
BIOL-420 Bacterial-Host Interactions: Microbiomes of the World
BIOL-601 Genetic Diseases and Disorders
BIOL-700 Cell Molecular Genetics
MEDS-201 Language of Medicine 
MEDS-240 History of Medicine 
MEDS-245 Medical Genetics
MEDS-330 Human Immunology
EXSC-205 Sports Physiology and Life Fitness
EXSC-206 FItness Prescription
EXSC-207 Exercise for Special Populations 
MEDS-300 Premedical Studies Seminar
MEDS-310 Introduction to Pharmacology
MEDS-313 Introduction to Infectious Diseases
MEDS-315 Medical Pathophysiology
MEDS-333 Patient Care
MEDS-345 Care-Based Genetic Counseling
EXSC-350 Exercise Physiology
MEDS-401 Medical Physiology Case Studies
MEDS-402 Medical Ethics Case Studies
MEDS-403 U.S. Health Care 
MEDS-405 Human Development l 
MEDS-406 Human Development ll
EXSC-430 Theory of Athletic Injury 
EXSC-410 Kinesiology
EXSC-280 Strength Training for Performance
EXSC-480 Training High Performance Athletes
MEDS-415 Pathophysiology of Organ Systems I
MEDS-420 History and Histophathology
MEDS-421 Parasitology
MEDS-422 Endocrinology
MEDS-425 Introduction to Neuroscience
MEDS-430 Epidemiology and Public Health
MEDS-490 Human Gross Anatomy 
MEDS-499 Biomedical Cooperative Education
MEDS-510 Biomedical Research
MEDS-511 Interdisciplinary Research
NUTR-300 Sports Nutrition
CHMA-221 Instrumental Analysis 
CHMA-222 Chemical Separations
CHMO-231 Organic Chemistry l
CHMO-235 Organic Chemistry Lab
CHMO-232 Organic Chemistry ll
CHMO-236 Comprehensive Organic Chemistry ll Lab 
CHMO-240 Biochemistry for Health Sciences
CHMB-402 Biochemistry l
CHMB-403 Biochemistry ll
CHMB-405 Biochemistry Lab
PHYS-111 College Physics l
PHYS 112 College Physics ll

Admission requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 3 years of math is required. Pre-calculus is recommended
  • Biology and Chemistry required

SAT (EBRW+M)
1180 -1350

ACT Composite
26-31

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in liberal arts, sciences, and math

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in biology or liberal arts with biology option




Effective fall 2013, RIT converted its academic calendar from quarters to semesters.
View this program's information from the retired quarter calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT converted its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.
 

Program overview

Biomedical sciences is an academic program designed to prepare students for advanced study in medical, dental, or graduate schools as they pursue careers in health care or biomedical research. Faculty, from across the basic science disciplines and within and outside of the college, offer a diverse curriculum as well as research opportunities for students. In tracking through a highly flexible curricular structure, students will have access to myriad scientific professionals and educational experiences.

For the past 20 years, researchers in the biomedical fields have enjoyed rapid gains in employment due, in part, to the advances in biotechnology and an increase in staff in new medical research industries. Continued employment growth will occur with the increased need for more research in many areas of health care, including AIDS, diabetes, cancer, and neurological disorders. Courses and concentration options within biomedical sciences are designed to attract students interested in the broad spectrum of medically related jobs and to provide a knowledge base and the technical skills required to pursue their chosen careers.

Curriculum

The curricular requirements for the BS degree in biomedical sciences are very flexible, consisting of a life sciences core and a broad range of flexible options. The life sciences core is designed to provide the student with a strong grounding in mathematics and science, a complement of liberal arts courses in preparation for a particular career path—e.g., entry into graduate study, including medical/dental school—or a research position in an applied area of biomedical science. Upon completion of the life sciences core, concentration areas are available in which the student, in consultation with an academic adviser, may select and complete a series of required and elective courses. Concentration areas include focused study in forensic science, pre-health professions (pre-medical, pre-dental), exercise science, pathology, neuroscience, and genetics. Students also may choose to use elective credits to engage in undergraduate research with a faculty mentor and/or pursue a secondary field of study through a minor in the liberal arts (communications, psychology, public policy, foreign language, etc.) or sciences (statistics, biochemistry, or imaging science), or possibly a second major.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Biomedical sciences, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

Course Qtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
1001-200, 259 Freshman Symposium 2
1001-201, 202, 203 General Biology I, II, III 9
1001-205, 206, 207 General Biology Lab I, II, III 3
1011-215, 216, 217 General and Analytical Chemistry I, II, III 10
1011-205, 206 Chemistry Principles I, II Lab 2
1011-227 General and Analytical Chemistry III Lab 1
1016-214, 215 Elementary Calculus I, II 6
  Wellness Education† 0
  Liberal Arts* 12
  First-Year Enrichment 2
Second Year
1001-311 Cell Biology 4
1001-350 Molecular Biology 4
1026-350, 360 Anatomy and Physiology I, II 10
1013-231, 232, 233 Organic Chemistry I, II, III 9
1013-235, 236, 237 Organic Chemistry I, II, III Lab 3
1016-319 Data Analysis I 4
  Science/Track Elective 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
Third Year
1017-211, 212, 213 College Physics I, II, III 12
  Science/Track Electives 16
  University-wide Electives 2-4
  Liberal Arts* 12
Fourth Year
  Science/Track Electives 24
  University-wide Electives 17
Total Quarter Credit Hours 180-182

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Biomedical sciences, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIOL-101 General Biology I  3
BIOL-103 General Biology I Lab 1
CHMG-141 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I 3
CHMG-145 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab 1
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
BIOL-102 General Biology 3
BIOL-104 General Biology II Lab 1
CHMG-142 LAS Perspective 6: General and Analytical Chemistry II 3
CHMG-146 LAS Perspectives 6: General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab 1
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
MATH-161 LAS Perspective 7A: Applied Calculus 4
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MEDS-250 Anatomy and Physiology I and lab 4
  Concentration Courses 8
Choose one of the following: 3
   STAT-145    Introduction to Statistics  
   STAT-155    LAS Perspective 7B: Introduction to Biostatistics  
  LAS Perspective 2, 3 6
MEDS-251 Anatomy and Physiology II and lab 4
BIOL-201 Cellular and Molecular Biology 4
Third Year
  Concentration Courses 11
  Professional Electives (WI) 12
  LAS Perspectives 4 3
Choose one of the following: 3
     Concentration Course    
     Professional Elective    
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Fourth Year
  Professional Electives 12
  Free Electives 12
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.