To view the required courses for this program, see the official RIT Program Page.

The MS degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials. With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines as chemistry; physics; and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.

Students with backgrounds in physics, chemistry, computer science, and nearly all engineering disciplines are welcome. RIT's MSE faculty focus on a variety of materials (polymers, semiconductors, metals, thin films, composites, nanomaterials) for a variety of applications (solar energy, batteries, sensors, advanced electronics).

Rochester Institute of Technology College of Science

Core Courses (15 cr. total)

(a) Intro to Materials Science 
(b) Solid State Science 
(c) Polymer Science
(d) Materials Degradation 
(e) Theoretical Methods 

Thesis Option

Students engage in directed research over several semesters (9 cr.), then write and defend a thesis. Students choose 6 credits of elective courses from a variety of STEM fields.

Project Option 

Students complete a semester-long research project (3 cr.), then present their findings. Students choose 12 credits of elective courses from a variety of STEM fields.

The objectives of the program are threefold:

  • With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines as chemistry; physics; and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.
  • The program provides extensive experimental courses in diverse areas of materials-related studies.
  • The program explores avenues for introducing greater harmony between industrial expansion and academic training.

This field includes physicists, chemists, as well as mechanical, chemical and microelectronic engineers. The field includes metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, composites and nanomaterials like buckyballs and carbon nanotubes. 

Graduate Admissions Requirements

1. Bachelor's Degree in a relevant science or engineering field with an overall GPA of 2.5 (where A = 4.0). 

2. Official Transcripts. 

3. Two letters of recommendation. Choose faculty or employers that can comment on your scientific abilities.

4. Personal Statement. Tell us about your background, relevant science or engineering experiences and goals, and why you are interested in earning a degree in Materials Science and Engineering.

5. International Students: TOEFL is required.

Admissions Deadlines

Domestic Students

• Priority Fall Admission: Feb 15
• General Fall Admission: June 1 
• Spring and Part Time Admissions: Rolling

International Students

Fall Admission only: Feb 15

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for the completion of the program. This includes five required core courses, graduate electives, and either a thesis or project. The core courses are specially designed to establish a common base of materials-oriented knowledge for students with baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, and related disciplines, providing a new intellectual identity to those involved in the study of materials.

The program has an emphasis on experimental techniques, with one required experimental course as part of the core. Additional experimental courses are available for students who wish to pursue course work in this area. These courses are organized into appropriate units covering many aspects of the analysis of materials. This aspect of the program will enhance a student’s confidence when dealing with materials-related problems.

Elective courses may be selected from advanced courses offered by the School of Chemistry and Materials Science or, upon approval, from courses offered by other RIT graduate programs. Elective courses are scheduled on a periodic basis. Transfer credit may be awarded based on academic background beyond the bachelor’s degree or by examination, based on experience.