RIT Information Security Alert: Campus Notification Phishing Attempt

Campus Notification Phishing Attempt

RIT people are receiving an email masquerading as a Campus Notification sent from the RIT Message Center. The message originated from off campus and includes a link to a non-RIT address. Clicking on the link will take you to the phishing site.

 

Here is the phishing email:

From: "RIT Message" <k.milne-15@student.lboro.ac.uk>
Date: Apr 10, 2017 5:55 PM
Subject: Campus Notification
To: <RIT ADDRESSEE>
CC:

Hi there,

You have an important campus notification Follow the link to read the notification

Campus Notification

Thank you,

RIT Campus Notification,


How do I know this is a phishing attempt?

  • The days of looking at an email and knowing immediately that it's a phishing attempt are over. The sender address and the logo may look authentic. Pay attention to what the email is asking you to do, or if it has an unexpected attachment.
  • RIT does not send out emails requesting your password or asking you to validate your website or assist with quarantine by clicking on a link, etc.
  • Phish use a common technique of trying to impart a sense of urgency and trying to get you to supply the requested information quickly.
  • You'll note that the sender address looks somewhat legitimate, and you may receive phishing attacks from spoofed or compromised RIT email accounts. (The ITS account was not compromised.)

 

What is RIT doing to protect me?

  • RIT blocks most phishing/malware attacks from reaching RIT e-mail accounts.
  • myMail.rit.edu has not been compromised 
  • SentinelOne Endpoint Protection with up-to-date virus definitions will protect against viruses and many other threats that may be associated with phishing emails. (Antivirus software is available free to RIT students, faculty, and staff for home use from http://www.rit.edu/its/services/security/).
  • MySpam will block many of these phishing e-mails. However, senders actively modify messages to avoid spam traps like Ironport, and that allows a few to slip through.

 

What can I do to protect myself?

RID RIT of the phishing attempt

  • REPORT the phishing attempt to spam@rit.edu
  • INSPECT you computer if you clicked on the link by running a virus scan. (Change your password if you provided it.)
  • DELETE the phishing attempt

 

For More Information

  • For more information about detecting Phishing, please visit the RIT Information Security Phishing page.

 

REMEMBER: RIT will NEVER ask for your password through e-mail.

 

Quick Infosec Tip: Many of us use smartphones or tablets to check our RIT email. Although we can’t hover our cursor over a link to see where the link goes, we can press on the link until we see the pop-up providing that information. We must be extremely cautious in clicking on links from our mobile devices.